Bad Boy (Inspector Alan Banks Series #19)

Bad Boy (Inspector Alan Banks Series #19)

3.9 26
by Peter Robinson, Simon Prebble
     
 

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“Brilliant! With Bad Boy, author Robinson once again achieves the high bar he’s set in all his previous Inspector Banks books…This one will stay with you for a long time.”
—Jeffery Deaver, New York Times bestselling author of Roadside Crosses

Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks faces his most challenging,

Overview

“Brilliant! With Bad Boy, author Robinson once again achieves the high bar he’s set in all his previous Inspector Banks books…This one will stay with you for a long time.”
—Jeffery Deaver, New York Times bestselling author of Roadside Crosses

Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks faces his most challenging, personal, and terrifying case yet when his own daughter crosses paths with a psychopath, in Peter Robinson’s superb Bad Boy. Dennis Lehane, author of Mystic River and Shutter Island, calls the novels of Peter Robinson, “chilling, evocative, deeply nuanced works of art.” Stephen King calls them, “the best series now on the market.” If you have not yet discovered this New York Times bestselling crime fiction master and his exceptional detective, now is definitely the time.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Robinson tries something different in his excellent 19th novel to feature Det. Chief Insp. Alan Banks (after All the Colors of Darkness) by keeping the Yorkshire policeman offstage for the first half of the book. Banks's daughter, Tracy, knows that her friend, Erin Doyle, is dating a bad boy. But she doesn't know how bad Jaff McCready is until the recovery of a gun at Erin's parents' home results in a fatal accident. Before Tracy knows what's happening, Jaff whisks her on an adventure, eventually hiding out at Banks's house while her father is on holiday in America. As Det. Insp. Annie Cabbot searches for Jaff, Tracy's infatuation turns sour when she finds Jaff's suitcase of drugs, money, and a gun, and becomes his hostage. When Banks returns to Yorkshire, he has to balance his roles as a cop and a father. Robinson deftly integrates Banks's personal life with an acute look at British attitudes about police, guns, and violence in this strong entry in a superb series. (Sept.)
Booklist
“Another outstanding crime novel from Robinson.”
Booklist (starred review) on Bad Boy
“Another outstanding crime novel from Robinson.”
Jeffery Deaver
“Robinson once again achieves the high bar he’s set in all his previous Inspector Banks books: gut-wrenching plotting alongside heart-wrenching portraits of the characters who populate his world, not to mention the top-notch police procedure. This one will stay with you for a long time.”
Joseph Wambaugh
“A murderous psychopath presents Alan Banks with the most intensely personal challenge of the maverick detective’s storied career. Superbly cinematic from the beginning to the explosive finale, this would be a thrilling movie.”
Strand magazine on Bad Boy
“Bad Boy is very, very good indeed.”
Richmond Times-Dispatch on Bad Boy
“A top-notch thriller that further advances Banks’ development as one of the most intriguing characters in detective fiction….With emotional literacy and inexorable momentum that builds tension to the breaking point, Robinson reaffirms his place in the top cadre of police-procedural writers.”
Booklist on Bad Boy
“Another outstanding crime novel from Robinson.”
Library Journal
. $25.99. MDCI Alan Banks's daughter, Tracy, has been feeling neglected lately. Her brother's music career has taken off, and she is still working in a bookstore while she tries to decide what she wants to do with her life. When suave and handsome bad boy Jaff McCready enters her life, she is ready for romance and vulnerable to his superficial charm. An illegal firearm found in her roommate's possession is traced to Jaff, and he convinces Tracy to leave the country with him. But she soon becomes his prisoner, as he holds her hostage in order to protect himself from the police. Banks must tread carefully if he is to save his daughter from this volatile and unstable young man. Verdict Branching out into new territory, Robinson's 19th installment in the Inspector Banks series (after All the Colors of Darkness) is more of a suspense story than a "whodunit." Excellent characterization and skillful plotting make this an engrossing read. [See Prepub Mystery, LJ 4/1/10.]—Linda Oliver, MLIS, Colorado Springs
Kirkus Reviews

Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks returns from a reflective U.S. vacation to contend with the abduction of his daughter and the shooting of his female partner.

In the 19th novel in British author Robinson's series, the Yorkshire inspector has no sooner gotten over the emotional fallout of the terror attack and romantic betrayal of his last adventure than he is hit with a double dose of upsetting news: His 24-year-old daughter Tracy is being held captive by a drug dealer being sought on a gun charge, and his partner and former lover Annie Cabbot is in critical condition after being shot by the dealer. Complicating matters is the fact that Tracy and the dealer, Jaff, the slick boyfriend of one of her flat mates, were sexually involved before life on the lam turned bad. It's up to Banks and his supporting cast of Eastvale cops to link Jaff to an unsolved killing from several years back and a brutal gang involved in the sex trade. The threat to Tracy is kept at a low boil; even after Jaff ties her up and rapes her, in her father's bed, the two act like any sparring couple. Her acting out with drugs, piercings, an assumed name and an unstable bad boy because her father neglected her in favor of his rock-star son Brian is superficially handled. And Annie's recovery is never in doubt. But the recharging feelings between Banks and Annie raise expectations for the next installment.

A lightweight but entertaining outing.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781449840662
Publisher:
Recorded Books, LLC
Publication date:
10/08/2010
Series:
Inspector Alan Banks Series, #19

What People are saying about this

Joseph Wambaugh
“A murderous psychopath presents Alan Banks with the most intensely personal challenge of the maverick detective’s storied career. Superbly cinematic from the beginning to the explosive finale, this would be a thrilling movie.”
Jeffery Deaver
“Robinson once again achieves the high bar he’s set in all his previous Inspector Banks books: gut-wrenching plotting alongside heart-wrenching portraits of the characters who populate his world, not to mention the top-notch police procedure. This one will stay with you for a long time.”

Meet the Author

One of the world’s most popular and acclaimed writers, Peter Robinson is the bestselling, award-winning author of the Inspector Banks series; he has also written two short-story collections and three standalone novels, which combined have sold more than ten million copies around the world. Among his many honors and prizes are the Edgar Award, the CWA (UK) Dagger in the Library Award, and Sweden’s Martin Beck Award.

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Bad Boy 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
TheReadingWriter More than 1 year ago
Peter Robinson writes a good mystery. Full stop. However, this novel in the series reminds us of the difficulties of crafting a believable story--keeping the characters true to their natures while adding complications and fixes without adding too many extraneous details. There were a couple times in this novel when I found myself watching Robinson struggle with a plot line. He managed admirably in the end, but the seams did show a bit. Not so much as to put us off him. It's all part of reading a long series. Our main man, Inspector Banks, was in California (!) for the beginning of the novel, and I must admit, my interest spiked to think we might get unvarnished insights into the American way of life from the sometimes impolitic police inspector. Alexis de Tocqueville he was not. But the story careened into mayhem in England without him on site, and then was brought to heel when he returned. I'll always look forward to more of Peter Robinson.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is yet another tour de force for Peter Robinson's flawed modern hero-policeman. The writerly skill with which Robinson mixes descriptions of mundane modern police work and the colorful life in the local pubs, ("...a pint and a pie..."),exposes us to the day to day lives of his cast of players, while leading us down the twisting path of uncovering the work of the bad guys. Despite the obvious value to a reader of some previous knowledge of character and context, one can easily pick up any of Robinson's Inspector Banks stories, and become immediately enveloped by the angst of locale and story line. In particular, if you know any anglophiles these Robinson books are for them.
TimAitch More than 1 year ago
Bad Boy has a complex plot, many characters, and few flaws. A fairly straightforward murder expands into a web of baffling interconnected criminal activity, which Annie and Alan struggle to decipher. Buy this book, you won't be disappointed.
BookLoverCT More than 1 year ago
I'm going to go back and read the earlier Inspector Alan Banks books. I have read about seven of this series already and want to go back and read many more. I don't think the first six are available in Nook format, but I will start with book #7.
FeatheredQuillBookReviews More than 1 year ago
Juliet Doyle has come to the Eastvale Police Station to speak with Inspector Alan Banks. You see, they used to be neighbors many years ago and she trusts her old neighbor to help with a family "situation." When she arrives at the station, she's disappointed to learn that Inspector Banks has taken a holiday - all the way to the United States. Banks' partner, Annie Cabbot, steps in to help the woman who is reluctant to speak with a stranger. Eventually, Annie is able to extract from Juliet the fact that her daughter Erin has a gun in her bedroom. This is a criminal offense in England so the police send an armed team to retrieve the gun. Juliet had simply wanted Inspector Banks to slip over to their house and defuse the situation. What she gets is an explosive situation that leaves one person dead. Erin's gun is soon traced to her boyfriend, Jaffar McCready, a young man with a rather seedy past. By the time the police get to Jaff's apartment, he's long gone. The catch is that he made his escape with the help of Erin's roommate, Tracy Banks. Yes, Tracy is the daughter of Inspector Banks. Tracy originally thought Jaff was simply running to avoid arrest as the owner of the retrieved gun, and by the time she learns the truth, it's too late - she's the man's hostage. Enter Inspector Banks who must solve the mystery behind Jaff's criminal past if he's to find the pair's whereabouts. Robinson is at his best in Bad Boy as the story moves briskly and easily draws the reader into the mystery. This is much more than a story about a stolen gun - it involves gangsters, drugs and a criminal from Banks' past. While the big climax scene seemed a bit too easily resolved, the suspense throughout the rest of the book was quite satisfying. If you love Inspector Banks to the point of wanting to read books that deal solely with his exploits, this may not be your favorite book in the series. He apparently likes to take long vacations as he is away for about half the book. There are little snippets of his time in the States, but the primary focus for about 150 pages is Annie Cabbot and her evolving detective skills. I enjoyed learning more about Annie and felt the author did a good job of developing her character. I hope to see her play a more prominent role in future books. Quill says: A thoroughly enjoyable addition to the Inspector Banks series.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Tracy Banks believes her friend Erin Doyle is dating a nasty person Jaff McCready. Erin's mom would agree with that assessment as she finds an illegal gun amongst Erin's possession. She reports this to the Eastvale police. A charmer, Jaff persuades Tracy to flee the country with him and though she should know better she agrees to go with him. Jaff and Tracy hide in the Yorkshire house of her father Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks while is in the States. Meanwhile Detective Inspector Annie Cabbot leads the investigation into Jaff's whereabouts. Tracy opens up Jaff's suitcase to find it filled drugs, money and a gun. His allure ends for her so he turns ugly holding her hostage even as her dad returns from overseas to find his daughter in danger. This is an excellent entry in the long running Banks police procedural series even with the lead playing at best a tertiary role (being overseas) in the first half of the novel. Even with the hero away, the story line is fast-paced throughout and when he returns the DCI conflicts between being the father of a hostage and the cop working a hostage situation arises. With an underlying theme of how the British feel about guns (and the gun laws) accentuated by the actions of Erin's mom, Peter Robinson affirms what his fans already know that you can bank on him for a powerful tale. Harriet Klausner
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Another in the continuing Inspector Banks series...good story, keeps you reading, the descriptions of Banks' musical interests and of the locales add personality and color.
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