Bad Boys Get Cookie!

Bad Boys Get Cookie!

by Margie Palatini, Henry Cole, Henry Cole
     
 

Those two bad boys — Willy and Wally — are still bad.

Bad. Bad. Really, really bad.

And now they have two big bad sweet tooths.

When the baker's cookie runs off, these newly cloaked private eyes, "Willis and Wallace," see their chance to Get Cookie!

But this is one smart cookie, and the pair may require a plan B. Can this terrible and

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Overview

Those two bad boys — Willy and Wally — are still bad.

Bad. Bad. Really, really bad.

And now they have two big bad sweet tooths.

When the baker's cookie runs off, these newly cloaked private eyes, "Willis and Wallace," see their chance to Get Cookie!

But this is one smart cookie, and the pair may require a plan B. Can this terrible and terribly hungry duo satisfy their hankering before their new disguises land them in ill-fated trouble?

Margie Palatini and Henry Cole reunite for a rollicking fairy-tale follow-up to their hilarious bad boys.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Willy and Wally, the hapless wolves from Bad Boys (which PW's starred review called "a sublimely silly story") set out to catch a runaway cookie, posing as incompetent detectives, Hansel and Gretel and more in Bad Boys Get Cookie! by Margie Palatini, illus. by Henry Cole. The hilarious illustrations brim with rib-tickling details and plenty of slapstick cartoon action. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz
Wally and Willy, the Bad Boy wolves. return with "two big bad sweet tooths" so bad that they eagerly volunteer to be detectives on the case of the elusive escaping Cookie, an obvious relative of the Gingerbread Man. Cookie's repeated refrain is: "Na-na-ni-na-na! Lookie! Lookie! You can't get me. I'm one smart cookie!" The Bad Boys have problems with all their carefully laid plans to catch him. But when not-so-smart Cookie floats away on a log that is really an alligator or crocodile, the boys are still hungry. Still dressed as Hansel and Gretel from one of their unsuccessful plots, they accept the invitation of an old woman to eat at her house, which looks suspiciously like a famous gingerbread creation. We leave those "really, really bad" boys near her oven, speculating on their fate. Cole's vignette and double-page ink and watercolor illustrations are comic, with some slapstick actions and exaggerated gestures. Some text phrases use large type, adding a visual lilt to the repeated refrains, or an aggressive "Peeeuuew!" at a skunk's defense. Only minimal settings are needed to support the fun.
Children's Literature - Suzanna E. Henshon
Margie Palatini begins her comic story with the lines, "Those two bad boys, Willy and Wally Wolf, had two big sweet tooths. Bad. Bad. Really, really bad." They spend their afternoons munching on caramels and bonbons and dreaming of chocolate cake. Their eating habits will cause most young readers' mouths to water. Soon, the wolves become private detectives in search of a baker's lost cookie who has run off. They promise the baker, "Don't fear, Mr. Baker. We know just how to handle him. Willis and Wallace always get their cookie." The Bad Boys search high and low for the cookie, who turns out to be pretty smart, and end their adventure with a big appetite and another plan. After being tricked a few times by the mischievous cookie, Willy and Wally dress up as Hansel and Gretel. Will they continue to end up in trouble due to their bad habits and ill-planned disguises? The humorous pictures are a perfect complement to a story that will enchant young readers for many years to come.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-Palatini and Cole follow up their hilarious Bad Boys (HarperCollins, 2003) with another pun-filled adventure replete with tomfoolery, fairy-tale references, and attempted cookie thievery. Willy and Wally are still "Bad. Bad. Really, really bad." When a baker's little treat hops off the cookie sheet and is on the lam, the wily wolves pose as detectives and attempt to capture the delicious runaway. After going out on a limb fails to land the prize, the duo switch gears and try plan B, disguising themselves as Hansel and Gretel. Failing again, they experience another moment of "brain ditto" and plan to trap the runaway with honey. But the spicy cookie continually taunts Willy and Wally with the refrain sure to be repeated by children: "Na-na-ni-na-na! Lookee! Lookee!/You can't get me. I'm one smart cookie!" Eventually the sassy cookie gets his comeuppance in the form of a hungry croc, and, although their attempts at capturing and snacking are repeatedly foiled, the scheming wolves find a new target. Those who enjoyed this dastardly duo in the previous title are sure to get a kick out of this entry, which will make for a rollicking read-aloud.-Piper L. Nyman, formerly at Fairfield Civic Center Library, CA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Palatini riffs on the Gingerbread Man and Hansel and Gretel stories in this return of her two bad boy wolves. Willy and Wally, aching to satisfy their sweet tooth, chase after a smart little cookie that has escaped from the bakery ("I'm afraid I added too much spice," moans the baker). Needless to say, Willy and Wally, despite being wolves, are outfoxed by the demon cookie even when they are dressed as Hansel and Gretel. There is a lot of good badinage between Willy and Wally, with their knowing exchanges, but some of that humor may be lost on younger readers, who may also be confused as to why honey-laid out as a trap by the wolves-would make the cookie slip and slide. Yet these lapses are smoothed over by Cole's merry, slapstick art. Never has a runaway cookie been so annoying looking, and never did Hansel and Gretel observe with such longing the witch's derriere. Yes, they are "Bad. Bad. Really, really bad" in all senses of the word. (Picture book. 4-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060744373
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
08/22/2006
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.80(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Margie Palatini is the author of many outrageously funny books for children, including Piggie Pie!, illustrated by Howard Fine; Moosetache, Mooseltoe, and the Bad Boys series, all illustrated by Henry Cole; The Cheese, illustrated by Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher; No Biting, Louise, illustrated by Matthew Reinhart; and Gorgonzola, illustrated by Tim Bowers. She lives with her family in New Jersey.

Henry Cole is the celebrated illustrator of many books for children, including the Bad Boys series by Margie Palatini, and is also the author and illustrator of the novel A Nest for Celeste.

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