Bad for You: Exposing the War on Fun!

Overview

SHOULD U.S. COMICS BE BANNED?

“SATANIC” HARRY POTTER BOOKS BURNT

PLAYGROUNDS POSE THREAT TO CHILDREN

TEXT-MAD YOUTH LOSING WRITING ABILITIES

CHILD SUSPENDED FOR BRANDISHING CHICKEN

SOCIAL WEBSITES HARM CHILDREN’S BRAINS

STUDENT ARRESTED FOR “PASSING GAS” AT SCHOOL

These ...

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Overview

SHOULD U.S. COMICS BE BANNED?

“SATANIC” HARRY POTTER BOOKS BURNT

PLAYGROUNDS POSE THREAT TO CHILDREN

TEXT-MAD YOUTH LOSING WRITING ABILITIES

CHILD SUSPENDED FOR BRANDISHING CHICKEN

SOCIAL WEBSITES HARM CHILDREN’S BRAINS

STUDENT ARRESTED FOR “PASSING GAS” AT SCHOOL

These are all real headlines screaming about the terrible stuff that’s out there . . . stuff that’s supposed to be BAD FOR YOU. But, honestly—is it?!

Bad for You asks this question and many more—and not just about the things that modern parents fear like violent video games, social media, and dirty hands. Stuff in this book goes back centuries—all the way to Plato (yeah, that one) and his worries over the new “technology” of his time: the written word! Kevin C. Pyle and Scott Cunningham cleverly expose the long-standing CAMPAIGN AGAINST FUN for what it really is: a bunch of anxious adults grasping at straws, ignoring scientific data, and blindly yearning for the good old days that never were. Bad for You presents the facts, figures, and a whole lot more—in eye-grabbing graphics—to debunk these myths and give kids the power to prove there’s nothing wrong with having fun . . . or with being young.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The writers clearly fall on the side of fun and make little effort to present convincing

counterarguments." - Booklist

"This book is funny, mind-boggling, entertaining, and completely educational. Make sure every teen gets a copy."– School Library Journal

"A survey of wet-blanketry through the ages." — Kirkus Reviews

Praise for Blindspot:

“With this graphic novel, Kevin Pyle has eloquently mapped out the line between youth and adulthood. He captures pivotal moments of transformation through pitch-perfect dialogue and surprising graphic inventions. Blindspot is everything that is great and unique about this art form.” —Peter Kuper, author/artist of Sticks and Stones

“This perfectly captures a shining moment of boyhood.” —Booklist

“Pyle uses the graphic novel format to powerful effect. . . .This is a very smart and humane graphic novel that . . . resonates with a broad emotional range.” —Publishers Weekly

Praise for Katman:

“The actions of these characters will make thoughtful readers reexamine their ideas about friendship, loyalty, and heroism.” —School Library Journal

“Inventive . . . an entertaining humanist parable.” —Booklist

Praise for Take What You Can Carry:

“An expressive view of the past that is both nostalgic and harshly realistic.” —Booklist

“Makes a powerful statement about respect, gratitude, and forgiveness.” —School Library Journal

From the Publisher
Praise for Blindspot:

“With this graphic novel, Kevin Pyle has eloquently mapped out the line between youth and adulthood. He captures pivotal moments of transformation through pitch-perfect dialogue and surprising graphic inventions. Blindspot is everything that is great and unique about this art form.” —Peter Kuper, author/artist of Sticks and Stones

“This perfectly captures a shining moment of boyhood.” —Booklist

“Pyle uses the graphic novel format to powerful effect. . . .This is a very smart and humane graphic novel that . . . resonates with a broad emotional range.” —Publishers Weekly

 

Praise for Katman:

“The actions of these characters will make thoughtful readers reexamine their ideas about friendship, loyalty, and heroism.” —School Library Journal

“Inventive . . . an entertaining humanist parable.” —Booklist

 

Praise for Take What You Can Carry:

“An expressive view of the past that is both nostalgic and harshly realistic.” —Booklist

“Makes a powerful statement about respect, gratitude, and forgiveness.” —School Library Journal

VOYA, February 2014 (Vol. 36, No. 6) - Laura Perenic
Conspiracy theorists have probably wondered about all the rules seemingly designed to maintain boredom. Bad For You illustrates the history of fun-squashing in lurid detail. Practically since Plato, adults have feared change, and now there is proof. Shocking and delightful, readers will yell out “I knew it” when they learn that texting represents similar language patterns as Egyptian hieroglyphics. Examples of the benefits of video gaming, jungle gyms, and skateboarding highlight how guidelines for our safety just ensure tedium. Everyone has something to learn from Bad For You as nearly every sort of activity from telephones to bicycles have inspired lawsuits and legal limitations on fun. An index would improve browsing and application to school assignments. The graphic novel format is appealing to multitasking minds who like fast-paced access to information. Some may find the page design frenetic and challenging. Readers of all ages will be drawn to the intriguing concept and eager to find proof that beloved pastimes were truly educational and not simply a public menace. Bad For You has a lot of applications for classroom use including a variety of research projects on reality versus perception, media influence, and the scientific method. Reviewer: Laura Perenic; Ages 11 to 18.
School Library Journal
09/01/2013
Gr 8 Up—A well-researched docu-comic. Covering topics such as comics, games, technology, and play, the chapters begin with a historical perspective on each subject. The authors then go on to explain how time after time, as new pastimes develop, they gain in popularity with youth until they enter the public limelight and are deemed potentially harmful to children. For example, the section on games begins with a description of the earliest archaeological discovery of dice and includes a reference to the poet Horace, who warned of the negative impact on youth who gamble with dice. The chapter explores the evolution of games and describes instances of adults trying to protect children from their negative impact, including Scientific American cautioning parents about chess in the mid-19th century and the attempts to legislate against Dungeons and Dragons and video-arcade games in the 1980s. In an examination of the current controversy about video games being responsible for violent behavior, the authors use countless scientific studies and other research as well as court cases to expose the fallacy behind the fear. Black-and-white graphic panels illustrate the text succinctly and add humor. Resources and references are included, with a more extensive list of references supplied on the book's website. Pyle and Cunningham argue that under the guise of protecting children, adults have created a youth-phobic society, in which "fear of the new" is the overriding impulse. They attempt to expose this mind-set and encourage readers to think critically about what is supposedly bad for them. This book is funny, mind-boggling, entertaining, and completely educational. Make sure every teen gets a copy.—Ragan O'Malley, Saint Ann's School, Brooklyn, NY
Kirkus Reviews
2013-09-15
As title and subtitle indicate, a survey of wet-blanketry through the ages. In broad chapters covering campaigns against comics, games, technology, play and thought, comics creators Pyle and Cunningham move from their area of expertise to less focused discussions of the ways the Man has sought to drain, mostly, adolescence of all enjoyment. They adopt a gleefully pulpy narrative mode conveyed in sequential panels, full-page cartoons and occasional eye-straining stretches of cramped text. There is a lot going on, both visually and in terms of content, and readers may find themselves disoriented by the pinball-machine approach the authors take. From a brief and engaging sketch of the beginnings of America's comic-book industry, they move to Fredric Wertham and The Seduction of the Innocent--a natural progression. But in short order, they proceed from comics to a detour on the scientific method, then to folklore, the Comstock laws and Harry Potter before moving back to fairy tales and then on to fantasy play--and that's all in the opening chapter that's nominally on comics. The prose is frequently rough-hewn and unapologetically shrill: "Speaking of SAVE--that's exactly what the controversy did for the vampire-trapping game ["Night Trap"] (sales had SUCKED until then)." Quotations from an admirable wealth of sources are liberally included, but they are rarely sourced in the text, leaving readers to wonder who really said what. A glossary at the beginning defines such terms as "abstinence" and "statistics," but both it and the text leave such terms as "disbarred" and "profiling" unexplained. Less exhaustive than exhausting, this catalog of killjoys, undeniably cool in concept, falters--a lot--in execution. (resources, references) (Graphic nonfiction. 12 & up)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780805092899
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
  • Publication date: 1/7/2014
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 722,025
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 7.90 (w) x 10.40 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Kevin C. Pyle is the author and illustrator of numerous graphic novels and docu-comics, the most recent of which is Take What You Can Carry. He also teaches comics and enjoys hanging around with his wife, son, two cats, and a dog in their creaky old house in New Jersey.

Scott Cunningham has written kids’ comics for DC, Archie, Nickelodeon Magazine and parodies for Mad. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife, daughter, TEN cats and one dog. He thinks he has enough pets for now.

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