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Bad Hare Day
     

Bad Hare Day

by Miriam Moss, Lynne Chapman (Illustrator)
 

When a Holly, a young hare, spends the day with her uncle at his hairdressing salon, she promises to be very good. But her uncle disappears to take a delivery at the back door, and Holly's irrepressible curiosity and fabulous sense of fun result in some very unusual hair designs. A bright and vibrant picture book perfect for young readers who will love the humor

Overview

When a Holly, a young hare, spends the day with her uncle at his hairdressing salon, she promises to be very good. But her uncle disappears to take a delivery at the back door, and Holly's irrepressible curiosity and fabulous sense of fun result in some very unusual hair designs. A bright and vibrant picture book perfect for young readers who will love the humor and all the well- tressed animals.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The puns and lively illustrations in this silly hair salon adventure will keep young readers laughing all the way to the rather obvious punchline. Hairdresser Herbert Hare has his hands full when his niece Holly visits his shop determined to help. While her uncle sorts out a shampoo order in the stock room, Holly wreaks havoc with a line of customers, including a giraffe, goat and eagle: "She went up and down, shaving a neck here, snipping a beard there and fixing Bald Eagle's new wig." Herbert calls Holly a "bad bad hare," but when she looks up at him "with sad, big brown eyes," and insists she was only trying to help, he chalks it all up to "a bad hare day" instead. Chapman contributes plenty of visual humor, (adding hair salon magazines like "Hair Today Gone Tomorrow" and "Curl Up & Dye"), often injecting more humor and characterization to the proceedings than the stolid text. Holly's innocent wide eyes and her pigeon-pawed stance help to make her a likable and plucky heroine, and Herbert's carefully curled, thin whiskers give him a hairdresser's elan and pizzazz. The bald eagle frets over his floppy orange wig, and a lion in a British waistcoat and pince nez stares imperiously despite his mangled mane. Thanks to the strong visuals, this harebrained scheme will likely tickle readers. Ages 4-7. (Apr.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Uncle Herbert Hare is the best hairdresser in town. Animals parade through his salon for a cut, a perm, or to be otherwise beautified. When his niece Holly is left there one day, she causes some chaos by taking over the hair action while Herbert steps out briefly. Armed with scissors, bleach, mousse, and blow drier, she horrifies Herbert on his return with her hair-raising creations. It turns out to be a "bad hair day" for the customers because of a "bad hare." Chapman's imagination runs wild depicting the very brief text, as Holly cuts here, chops there, "volumises" Leon the lion's mane, and otherwise "helps" her uncle. The very broadly conceived characters, done in textured, smeary pastel colors in the most basic of settings, go through a sequence of mix-ups appropriate for this silly fun and the one-punch-line joke ending. 2003, Bloomsbury Children's Books,
— Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-Herbert Hare is the best hairdresser in town. When his niece, Holly, is left in his care for the day, chaos ensues. While Herbert and his assistant see to a shampoo delivery, the rambunctious young hare smears the mirrors; empties the drink dispenser; and cuts, bleaches, and perms a variety of customers' hair. Her antics will elicit easy laughs as the illustrations kick in to show Lion's mane "volumised," Flamingo fluffed to three times her size, and Moose's head full of foamy mousse. When Herbert returns, the forgiving response becomes, "Let's just say it's been a bad hare day." This is an ordinary story that is greatly enhanced by the illustrations. The vibrant and expressive art is created with colored chalk pastels on a textured surface. The drawings are big as life with fully realized characters. Herbert, with his curlicued whiskers, red vest, and flamboyant tuft of yellow hair, is believable as a zany artiste. Giraffe sits daintily with her legs crossed, a set of pink earrings dangling from her ears, while Bald Eagle glances with concern at his watch. Readers will be drawn in by these creatures and their predicaments, but overall, the story is slight.-Martha Topol, Traverse Area District Library, Traverse City, MI Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A weak outing from the creators of the Smudge books (A New House for Smudge, not reviewed, etc.). Deposited in Uncle Herbert Hare's hairdressing shop while her mother is out shopping, little Holly promises to be good-but when Herbert hops into the back room to take a delivery (for several hours, evidently), Holly impulsively proceeds to shave, chop, bleach, mousse, and brush as she pleases an array of befuddled, inexplicably passive animal customers. Then, oozing insincere contrition, Holly takes her flabbergasted uncle's hand (according to the text, anyway, in the accompanying illustration, his arms are full of boxes), and earns nothing for her misbehavior but an indirect reprimand (see title) as she saunters from the totally trashed salon. The episode then chops off, leaving readers to wonder why Holly should get off scot-free, or what became of the menacing crowd of vengeful customers on the previous page. The best part of this is the title-and that's not even original. (Picture book. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781582347851
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
04/19/2003
Edition description:
1ST US
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
12.18(w) x 9.76(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Miriam Moss was born in England and has lived in the Middle East, Africa and China. She worked as a teacher in the United Kingdom and Kenya before starting her writing career. She has written over 50 non-fiction titles, recently she has written fiction as well. She lives in Sussex, England.

Lynne Chapman has worked as a freelance illustrator for 18 years and spends time outside the studio visiting schools and libraries. She lives in Sheffield, England.

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