Bad Kids: Race and the Transformation of the Juvenile Court

Bad Kids: Race and the Transformation of the Juvenile Court

by Barry C. Feld
     
 
Written by a leading scholar of juvenile justice, this book explores the social and legal changes that have transformed the juvenile court in the last three decades from a nominally rehabilitative welfare agency into a scaled-down criminal court for young offenders. It explores the complex relationship between race and youth crime to explain both the Supreme Court

Overview

Written by a leading scholar of juvenile justice, this book explores the social and legal changes that have transformed the juvenile court in the last three decades from a nominally rehabilitative welfare agency into a scaled-down criminal court for young offenders. It explores the complex relationship between race and youth crime to explain both the Supreme Court decision to provide delinquents with procedural justice and the more recent political impetus to "get tough" on young offenders. This provocative book will be necessary reading for criminal and juvenile justice scholars, sociologists, legislators, and juvenile justice personnel.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
This is the latest title in Oxford's "Studies in Crime and Public Policy" series, much of which deals with youth crime and its relationship to society. Feld (Minnesota Law Sch.) is a leading scholar in the field of juvenile justice administration. Here he briefly traces the evolution of the juvenile court from its inception in the early 1900s, with an emphasis on the past three decades. Early juvenile courts were seen as rehabilitative welfare agencies, but with the Supreme Court's emphasis in the 1960s on due process, children began to be seen as defendants. As a result of a series of Supreme Court decisions, Feld asserts, juveniles now receive the "worst of both worlds." He explores the complex relationship between race and youth crime in an attempt to understand the court decisions that lead to procedural justice. He also discusses the recent political impetus to treat juveniles as adults in some cases. His points are well made and persuasive. Recommended for libraries with an interest in juveniles and criminal justice.--Sandra K. Lindheimer, Middlesex Law Lib., Cambridge, MA
From the Publisher
"...compelling...he does...correctly identify the conceptual flaw in a system."—Juvenile Justice Update

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195097870
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
03/28/1999
Series:
Studies in Crime and Public Policy Series
Pages:
392
Sales rank:
1,228,720
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.20(h) x 1.20(d)
Lexile:
1580L (what's this?)

What People are saying about this

Jeffrey Fagan
Barry Feld challenges critics and supporters of the juvenile court with a uniquely rich analysis of law and social policy that demands attention. Bad Kids moves the debate on the future of the juvenile court beyond the rhetoric of criminalization and the nostalgia of the child savers, toward a vision that embraces concepts from law, adolescent development, and community structure.
— Columbia University
Ira M. Schwartz
This is a timely and provocative book that plows new ground. It will have a major influence on the emerging debate regarding the future of the juvenile justice system in the United States.
— University of Pennsylvania
Kimberly Kempf-Leonard
Barry Feld's stand on reforming juvenile justice will surely be controversial, but his reasoning is clear, and his position is well argued. Even those who disagree with Feld's conclusions will gain valuable insight into the changes in American society and law that have brought our juvenile justice system to its present state.
— University of Missouri at St. Louis

Meet the Author

Barry Feld is Centennial Professor of Law at the University of Minnesota Law School. He has written five books and more than three dozen law review and criminology articles on juvenile justice administration with specil emphases on serious offenders, procedural justice, and youth sentencing policy.

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