Bad Medicine: Doctors Doing Harm since Hippocrates

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Overview


Just how much good has medicine done over the years? And how much damage does it continue to do?

The history of medicine begins with Hippocrates in the fifth century BC. Yet until the invention of antibiotics in the 1930s doctors, in general, did their patients more harm than good.

In this fascinating new look at the history of medicine, David Wootton argues that for more than 2300 years doctors have relied on their patients' misplaced faith in their ability to cure. Over and over again major discoveries which could save lives were met with professional resistance. And this is not just a phenomenon of the distant past. The first patient effectively treated with penicillin was in the 1880s; the second not until the 1940s. There was overwhelming evidence that smoking caused lung cancer in the 1950s; but it took thirty years for doctors to accept the claim that smoking was addictive. As Wootton graphically illustrates, throughout history and right up to the present, bad medical practice has often been deeply entrenched and stubbornly resistant to evidence.

This is a bold and challenging book--and the first general history of medicine to acknowledge the frequency with which doctors do harm.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199212798
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 11/16/2007
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 7.60 (w) x 5.10 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

David Wootton is Anniversay Professor of History at the University of York. He has published widely in early modern intellectual history, particularly on the history of political thought, and is a regular reviewer for the London Review of Books and the Times Literary Supplement.

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Table of Contents

Introduction : bad medicine/better medicine 1
I The Hippocratic tradition 27
1 Hippocrates and Galen 29
2 Ancient anatomy 42
3 The canon 49
4 The senses 53
Conclusion to part I : the placebo effect 67
II Revolution postponed 71
5 Vesalius and dissection 73
6 Harvey and vivisection 94
7 The invisible world 110
Conclusion to part II : trust not the physician 139
III Modern medicine 151
8 Counting 153
9 Birth of the clinic 177
10 The laboratory 185
11 John Snow and cholera 195
12 Puerperal fever 211
13 Joseph Lister and antiseptic surgery 224
14 Alexander Fleming and penicillin 242
Conclusion to part III : progress delayed 250
IV After contagion 257
15 Doll, Bradford Hill, and lung cancer 259
16 Death deferred 269
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