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Baghdad without a Map and Other Misadventures in Arabia
     

Baghdad without a Map and Other Misadventures in Arabia

4.4 7
by Tony Horwitz
 

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“A very funny and frequently insightful look at the world’s most combustible region.”—The New York Times Book Review

NATIONAL BESTSELLER

With razor-sharp wit and insight, intrepid journalist Tony Horwitz gets beyond solemn newspaper headlines and romantic myths of Arabia to offer startling close-ups of a volatile region

Overview

“A very funny and frequently insightful look at the world’s most combustible region.”—The New York Times Book Review

NATIONAL BESTSELLER

With razor-sharp wit and insight, intrepid journalist Tony Horwitz gets beyond solemn newspaper headlines and romantic myths of Arabia to offer startling close-ups of a volatile region few Westerners understand. His quest for hot stories takes him from the tribal wilds of Yemen to the shell-pocked shores of Lebanon; from the malarial sands of the Sudan to the eerie souks of Saddam Hussein’s Iraq, a land so secretive that even street maps and weather reports are banned.

As an oasis in the Empty Quarter, a veiled woman offers tea and a mysterious declaration of love. In Cairo, “politeness police” patrol seedy nightclubs to ensure that belly dancers don’t show any belly. And at the Ayatollah’s funeral in Tehran a mourner chants, “Death to America,” then confesses to the author his secret dream—to visit Disneyland.

Careening through thirteen Muslim countries and Israel, Horwitz travels light, packing a keen eye, a wicked sense of humor, and chutzpah in almost suicidal measure. This wild and comic tale of Middle East misadventure reveals a fascinating world in which the ancient and the modern collide.

“As a document of the cultural impasse that brought on the war, this is unsurpassed.”—Village Voice

“High-spirited and entertaining.”—The New Yorker

“A timely and incisive insider’s description of the mysterious Arab World . . . Tony Horwitz is an ideal guide for American Reader.”—Chicago Tribune

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“A very funny and frequently insightful look at the world’s most combustible region.”—The New York Times Book Review

“As a document of the cultural impasse that brought on the war, this is unsurpassed.”—Village Voice

“High-spirited and entertaining.”—The New Yorker

“A timely and incisive insider’s description of the mysterious Arab World . . . Tony Horwitz is an ideal guide for American Reader.”—Chicago Tribune

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780452267459
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/28/1992
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
716,555
Product dimensions:
5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.69(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Tony Horwitz is the author of One for the Road and the bestselling Baghdad Without a Map. A senior writer for The Wall Street Journal and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for national reporting, he has also written for The New Yorker and Harper's, among other publications. He lives with his wife and son in Virginia.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Waterford, Virginia
Date of Birth:
1958
Place of Birth:
Washington, D.C.
Education:
B.A., Brown University; M.A., Columbia University School of Journalism

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Baghdad Without a Map and Other Misadventures in Arabia: And Other Misadventures in Arabia 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
marquisofq More than 1 year ago
I guess it helps to be a history buff, but honestly, he is funny! Baghdad Without a Map gives you an insiders view of all the different personailites of each of the Arab nations. Or perhaps, I just loved the excitement of the life of a foreign correspondant. I'm hooked......keep on writing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In this book, Tony Horwitz gives a first-hand account of the daily life of people in the Middle East in the 1990¿s. Being a journalist, he is able to recall and describe the events he witnesses with astonishing clarity, making the picture that much more realistic. This book comes from a time when America was not always the enemy, and he is able to gather stories and experiences that we could no longer hear. The fact that he is Jewish makes it all the more interesting, because nowadays we cannot imagine a Jewish journalist traveling through the most anti-Zionist region in the world. Overall, a very well written book that really pulls the reader in.
Guest More than 1 year ago
was a great book! I couldn't STOP reading it! great, funny, and interesting!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm not usually drawn to travel narratives but this one caught my eye at the bookstore because of its title, obviously very topical. I truly enjoyed this tale. It seemed to describe adventures that any traveler who went off the beater path could experience. It was breezy and light and, although published in '91, probably still relevent. I've never been to the region, but you can't pick-up a newspaper withhout reading about the very places the author vistis in this book, and that makes it enjoyable.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Definitly funny and insightfull. I have been to Egypt two times and his chapters on Cairo are my favorites. This book only lasted me 2 days, but left me wanting more chapters and more stories.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I made the mistake of reading this book in a public place. People stared because I couldn't stop laughing out loud, but I couldn't bring myself to stop reading, either. 'Baghdad Without A Map' is hands down the best travel book I've ever encountered. I'm currently reading it for the second time, and enjoying it as much as I did the first. Mr. Horwitz is an immensely talented writer.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Why is Pepsi mentioned about 4 times? Soft drink, soda, would work. About the only other brand name mentioned was Duracell which was mentioned once. The transitions between chapters needs work. Excellent use of scent description of the environments. Olafactory images are very powerful. Smashing sense of humour but the author is a little to smitten with his own cleverness. Trys just a little too hard. "Coup attempts were common in Khartoum, . . ." is slightly on the sophmoric side. Clever type layout on pages 236-237. At the bottom of p 236 "He jabbed his Kalashnikov through the window and fired . . . At the top of p. 237 "questions at the driver." Other than that, Horwitz's work is the best yet on the Middle East. It's one of those books that one can not wait to take up again. Perfect for the plane ride from LAX to New Zealand.