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Balancing The Beast
     

Balancing The Beast

5.0 1
by Helena Smole
 
Helena Smole presents her own successful path out of her daily struggle against extreme mood swings, suicidal thoughts, paranoia, and other delusions in her book Balancing the Beast: A Bright View of Schizoaffective Disorder - Bipolar or Manic-Depressive Type. The book describes a unique combination of humor and hard work along with psychiatric medication. The

Overview

Helena Smole presents her own successful path out of her daily struggle against extreme mood swings, suicidal thoughts, paranoia, and other delusions in her book Balancing the Beast: A Bright View of Schizoaffective Disorder - Bipolar or Manic-Depressive Type. The book describes a unique combination of humor and hard work along with psychiatric medication. The mental exercises, lifestyle choices, and other alternative medicine approaches that she combined with clinically-prescribed medication eventually led to the alleviation of her illness. As shown in the book, her success is to a significant extent due to having fully accepted herself the way she is, the illness included.

About the author: Helena Smole is a 36-year-old language specialist who decided to write about mental illness. She believes that the most dangerous stigma is the one mental patients carry around in their heads. Her mission is to make mental illness casual and thus help her co-patients rebuild their self-esteem.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9789619297902
Publisher:
Domen Smole
Publication date:
02/03/2011
Pages:
154
Sales rank:
569,899
Product dimensions:
5.06(w) x 7.81(h) x 0.33(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

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Balancing The Beast 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
BridgetC42 More than 1 year ago
I know that schizoaffective disorder is an illness that can be horrific and tortuous, having lost a friend to it two years ago. So when a person can talk about coming through it to find a purpose and to be productive and functional, I think it is a wonderful inspiration. I think it is amazing and fantastic for Helena Smole to share such a personal and intimate journey with so far such a positive and optimistic outcome. As a sufferer of obsessive-compulsive disorder, I found Helena Smole's book to be a helpful guide to anyone with any kind of mental illness. I found myself underlining several passages in the book which I found helpful to me. The pure optimism that infuses this book is so inspiring. And, knowing the schizoaffective illness as I do, I know that Smole's journey must have been a long one of two steps forward, three steps back--but she kept going with the exercises which have helped her to maintain a positive attitude. I can imagine, and she notes in the book, how much she had to do her affirmations, how many times she had to repeat things until she was able to move on to another step. I think the best part of the book was Smole's ability to reinforce that a person is NOT his/her illness. It is an aspect of life, but NOT one's identity. Too often when one is diagnosed with any kind of illness--physical or mental--that person becomes defined by that illness both by himself as well as those around him. Yet an illness is only an aspect of one's entire life, and Smole is wonderfully forward and engaging when she talks about characteristics ("character flaws" she calls them) of herself that may be easy to dismiss as part of the illness but are actually qualities she can do work on. Smole is a brave and talented woman, and I admire her ability to make a contribution where she can, helping to break the stigma of mental illness and educate people about what it is and what it is not. I hope she has many, many books in her. I would especially appreciate more about her struggles if she could write more about them. Best to her!