A Ball for Daisy

A Ball for Daisy

4.0 11
by Chris Raschka
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Here's a story about love and loss as only Chris Rashcka can tell it. Any child who has ever had a beloved toy break will relate to Daisy's anguish when her favorite ball is destroyed by a bigger dog. In the tradition of his nearly wordless picture book Yo! Yes?, Caldecott Medalist Chris Raschka explores in pictures the joy and sadness that having a special toy can

Overview

Here's a story about love and loss as only Chris Rashcka can tell it. Any child who has ever had a beloved toy break will relate to Daisy's anguish when her favorite ball is destroyed by a bigger dog. In the tradition of his nearly wordless picture book Yo! Yes?, Caldecott Medalist Chris Raschka explores in pictures the joy and sadness that having a special toy can bring. Raschka's signature swirling, impressionistic illustrations and his affectionate story will particularly appeal to young dog lovers and teachers and parents who have children dealing with the loss of something special.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In a wordless book with gentle, dreamlike spreads, Daisy, a feisty, black-eared dog plays with a beloved red ball indoors and out, before a climactic encounter with another dog in the park. Working loosely in ink, watercolor, and gouache, Caldecott-winner Raschka (The Hello, Goodbye Window) alternates between large closeups of Daisy—curled up with the ball on a sofa, looking nervous when the ball lands behind a fence—and smaller panels for action scenes. Raschka conveys a bevy of canine moods (ecstatic, expectant, downtrodden) with brush strokes reminiscent of calligraphy, while the red ball adds striking contrast. When a brown dog causes the ball to pop, Daisy stares at it, nudges it, sniffs it, and shakes it in her mouth before gazing helplessly at her owner. But returning to the park later, Daisy’s forlorn expression turns gleeful as the same brown dog reappears with a blue ball, letting Daisy take it home. Readers should relate to Daisy’s sadness over the loss of her treasured object while understanding that such losses can sometimes lead to unexpected gains—maybe even a friend. Ages 3–7. (May)
From the Publisher

2012 Randolph Caldecott Medal Winner

Starred Review, School Library Journal, August 2011:
"Raschka’s genius lies in capturing the essence of situations that are deeply felt by children."

Starred Review, Horn Book, September/October 2011:
"a story that is noteworthy for both its artistry and its child appeal."

Starred Review, Kirkus Reviews, December 1, 2011:
“Rarely, perhaps never, has so steep an emotional arc been drawn with such utter, winning simplicity.”

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Daisy, a frisky dog, plays happily with her big red ball, as full-page illustrations and action vignettes start this wordless tale of the discovery of a friend. Daisy is taken to the park to play with her ball, only to have a brown dog snatch it away and break it. Daisy's distress at the deflated ball is apparent. Taken home by her young mistress, she is inconsolable. At the park next day, however, they meet the brown dog, his mistress, and her big blue ball. The dogs play happily together until their mistresses wave goodbye. Daisy is pleased to get to take the blue ball home. Raschka's typical ink, watercolor, and gouache almost slap-dash images generate happy emotion as they create just enough background and characters to add conviction to the adventure of this most appealing pup. No words are required to express either her joy in playing with her ball or her depression when it is broken. The double page with eight sequential vignettes depicting her loss is particularly effective, as is the final picture of contentment with the new ball. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—Ever the minimalist, Raschka continues to experiment with what is essential to express the daily joys and tribulations of humans and animals. This wordless story features Daisy, a dog. The motion lines framing her tail on the first page indicate that a big red ball is her chief source of delight. Ever-changing, curvy gray brushstrokes, assisted by washes of watercolor, define her body and mood. Blue and yellow surround her ecstatic prance to the park with toy and owner. The story's climax involves another dog joining the game, but chomping too hard, deflating the beloved ball. A purple cloud moves in, and eight squares fill a spread, each surrounding the protagonist with an atmosphere progressing from yellow to lavender to brown as the canine processes what has occurred; a Rothko retrospective could not be more moving. Until that point, the action has occurred within varying page designs, many showing Daisy's shifting sentiments in four vertical or horizontal panels. Her attentive human's legs are glimpsed frequently, a sunny child whose warmth is transferred in comforting full view at bedtime. When another day dawns, the frisky dog's person proffers a blue surprise; the exuberance at having a ball and a friend is barely containable across two pages. Raschka's genius lies in capturing the essence of situations that are deeply felt by children. They know how easy it is to cause an accident and will feel great relief at absorbing a way to repair damage.—Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375980527
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
01/23/2012
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
575,062
File size:
9 MB
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher

2012 Randolph Caldecott Medal Winner

Starred Review, School Library Journal, August 2011:
"Raschka’s genius lies in capturing the essence of situations that are deeply felt by children."

Starred Review, Horn Book, September/October 2011:
"a story that is noteworthy for both its artistry and its child appeal."

Starred Review, Kirkus Reviews, December 1, 2011:
“Rarely, perhaps never, has so steep an emotional arc been drawn with such utter, winning simplicity.”

Meet the Author

CHRIS RASCHKA has written and/or illustrated over 30 books for children, including The Purple Balloon, called "deceptively simple and beautifully direct" by Kirkus Reviews. His other books include Good Sports, an ALA Notable Book; the 2006 Caldecott Medal winning title, The Hello, Goodbye Window; the Caldecott Honor Books Yo! Yes?; and Mysterious Thelonius.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

A Ball for Daisy 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An absolutely beautiful story! Chris Raschka touches your heart without needing a single word. I am 23 years old and both my mother and I (who have a dog named Daisy) cried "reading" this book. It's a simple story full of emotion that will capture you from page one!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Beautiful illustrations but no words.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have an auto graphed copy he came to my class and talked about how he makes books
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Though Chris Raschka does not use any words in this story, the illustrations bring the story to life. The colors and expressions in the illustrations bring the book to life. I think the story of Daisy and her ball is very touching for all ages. Everyone has something that they love and would never want to lose and "A Ball For Daisy" really brings those feeling to the surface. "A Ball For Daisy" is a touching book that can be used in classrooms and at home.
anovelreview_blogspot_com More than 1 year ago
A BALL FOR DAISY, is a hardbound wordless book. From the illustrations the story is that of a dog who loves his ball, loses his ball and gains a new friend. I sat down with my 5 and 3 year old and really wasn't sure what to expect. I can't say I've ever bought a book without words, I sure didn't expect much to be honest with you. Wow was I wrong! Both kids LOVED this book! With each picture they started telling me the story they say on the pages (and yes most of the time telling me at the same time, lol). Not only were they extra animated, but we easily discussed "feelings of losing a toy" and "how do we behave when someone accidentally breaks something of ours." Not only did they both enjoy it, but my three year old has been dragging it around the house so she can "read" it by herself! This would make a fantastic Christmas gift for your pre-readers! Definite recommend!
MeghanM1 More than 1 year ago
I think that this book was an enjoyable book. Its illustrations capture you and take you in to feel every emotion throughout the book. This would be a good book in the classroom to help children understand emotions and also how you can feel the emotions from illustrations in a book. This can also teach children about breaking toys or breaking other peoples toys and how they will feel about it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Stephanie_RSR More than 1 year ago
When I purchased A Ball for Daisy, I initially thought it was a book aimed only at young children, I was thinking prekindergarten to kindergarten age kids. I was quickly proven wrong when my 7 year old daughter (2nd grader) was highly intrigued by this wordless book. What I really loved about this wordless book is the layers of different emotions Raschka creates, they’re incredible. The story line is simple, a little puppy loses but soon after, reclaims her favorite toy. This book would be great for teaching young children different types emotions and for what reasons those emotions occur, but also, it would be great for allowing older students to create their own words to go with the pictures and develop individual thoughts on what would make a great story line. Over all, this is a fun little story to share with family or children in a classroom and to simply just help in evoking a love for all different kinds of books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent tale of a pup and her ball. Though wordless, it teaches kids about love, loss, and recovery. Beautifully illustrated. A small masterpiece with a large heart.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My kid threw the nook. Im so mad. Waste of money