Banaras: City of Light by Diana L. Eck, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Banaras: City of Light

Banaras: City of Light

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by Diana L. Eck
     
 

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This is the acclaimed study and interpretation of Banaras, the holy place of the Hindus.

In Banaras, Diana Eck . . . has written a notable book about this greatest of Indian pilgrimage sites. . . . Her brilliant, comprehensive book seems likely to remain for a long time the definitive work on this great Indian city. (Washington Post)

Eck is a master

Overview

This is the acclaimed study and interpretation of Banaras, the holy place of the Hindus.

In Banaras, Diana Eck . . . has written a notable book about this greatest of Indian pilgrimage sites. . . . Her brilliant, comprehensive book seems likely to remain for a long time the definitive work on this great Indian city. (Washington Post)

Eck is a master of tone here. She begins as dry scholar, allows her personal voice to emerge and then, through judicious use of lyric quotations, advances to a striking level of exaltation and triumph. . . . To take us gently off this high, Eck buttresses us-and her arguments-with a truly amazing display of addenda; glossaries, calendars and appendices. One ends filled with admiration and awe, not just for the vision given us, but for the scholarship and dedication that made it possible. (Los Angeles Times)

Apart from its values to the specialist scholar, [Eck's] book will be at least equally rewarding to the student or general reader wishing to understand what Hinduism is about. . . . Admirable and lucid. (Times Literary Supplement)

A major event among studies of India. (John Stratton Hawley, Asia)

The most beautiful book . . . on India. (Journal of the American Academy of Religion)

Editorial Reviews

Los Angeles Times
Eck is a master of tone here. She begins as dry scholar, allows her personal voice to emerge and then, through judicious use of lyric quotations, advances to a striking level of exaltation and triumph. . . . To take us gently off this high, Eck buttresses us-and her arguments-with a truly amazing display of addenda; glossaries, calendars and appendices. One ends filled with admiration and awe, not just for the vision given us, but for the scholarship and dedication that made it possible.
Washington Post
In Banaras, Diana Eck . . . has written a notable book about this greatest of Indian pilgrimage sites. . . . Her brilliant, comprehensive book seems likely to remain for a long time the definitive work on this great Indian city.
Times Literary Supplement
Apart from its values to the specialist scholar, [Eck's] book will be at least equally rewarding to the student or general reader wishing to understand what Hinduism is about. . . . Admirable and lucid.
John Stratton Hawley
A major event among studies of India.
Journal of the American Academy of Religion
The most beautiful book . . . on India.
Asia
A major event among studies of India.

— John Stratton Hawley

Asia - John Stratton Hawley
A major event among studies of India.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780394519715
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/12/1982
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
427

Meet the Author

Diana L. Eck is professor of comparative religion and Indian studies and director of The Pluralism Project at Harvard University. She is the author of many books, including Daŕsan: Seeing the Divine Image in India and the editor of On Common Ground: World Religions in America, a multimedia CD-ROM, both published by Columbia.

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Banaras: City of Light 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Keep on going your amazing!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
(Note to Reader-This is based off a game. So if this seems familiar, guess. Anyway, whats this is based off of, that belongs to the author. Enjoy?)----The girl dashed through the gallery with the painting in her arms."I must not let her get this." the girl thought."She might get free." The gallery was like a maze, long hallways and dead ends. The girl turned down a corridor and dashed for the door ahead of her, her hopes rising. She opened the door and looked inside. It was nothing but a room filled with paintings of bunnies. Bunny paintings and ornaments. The girl ran in and locked the door shut."This may not be the exit." she muttered,"but its a good place to hide the painting before she kills me." She heard scratches on the door, a good sign she should hide it. She hid the painting behind a large painting of a pink bunny. Suddenly, there was a laugh, followed by silence. The girl breathed a quick sigh of relief, thinking it was over. She opened the door to the corridor slowly. Nothing there. She stepped out and felt a sharp pain in her back. Slowly, the girl reached back there and found a handle in her back. She pulled it out shakily and found a pallet knife, covered in blood.(That was the prologue. I think I made it too short though. Anyway, next chapter, next result. Post a comment please! See ya!)