Bandersnatch

Bandersnatch

by Paul Tremblay, Sean Wallace
     
 

Rich in curiosity and virtue, poor in dirths of the imagination and the dull phrase, Bandersnatch in this dead trees edition, eschewing flesh-and-blood for pulp, deals in the currency of wonder and mystery.
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Overview

Rich in curiosity and virtue, poor in dirths of the imagination and the dull phrase, Bandersnatch in this dead trees edition, eschewing flesh-and-blood for pulp, deals in the currency of wonder and mystery.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

It may or may not be frumious, but this original anthology from Tremblay (City Pier: Above & Below) and Wallace (Jabberwocky 2) positively revels in the "strange, dark, and unpredictable." Nearly all the 13 stories have both feet firmly in the avant-garde. Several tilt toward black-humored horror, and even the authors' bios run to the bizarre. Talking animals and strange landscapes abound, from the taiga and bears (but no lion) in Alan DeNiro's surreal opening tale "Taiga, Taiga, Burning Bright" to the genetic hybrids in Karen Heuler's "Down on the Farm," which concludes the volume by evoking both Poe and Orwell. Dogs in particular are well represented, figuring in Heuler's story as well as Ursula Pflug's "Border Crossing" and Bogdan Tiganov's "The Children." An iguana and a soda can trade quips in Seth Ellis's "The Sidewinders," and "Scar Stories" by Vylar Kaftan personifies a cat, a punchbowl and the party where they're present. This corner of the genre is very much an acquired taste, but for those who dig that funky groove, this anthology more than delivers what it promises. (Jan.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780809572663
Publisher:
Prime Books
Publication date:
11/01/2007
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
4.50(w) x 6.25(h) x 0.25(d)

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