Bang the Drum Slowly

Bang the Drum Slowly

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by Mark Harris
     
 

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Henry Wiggen, hero of The Southpaw, became the best-known fictional baseball player in America. Now he is back again in Bang the Drum Slowly, throwing a baseball "with his arm and his brain and his memory and his bluff for the sake of his pocket and his family."

Also available in Bison Book editions are The Southpaw, It Looked Like For

Overview

Henry Wiggen, hero of The Southpaw, became the best-known fictional baseball player in America. Now he is back again in Bang the Drum Slowly, throwing a baseball "with his arm and his brain and his memory and his bluff for the sake of his pocket and his family."

Also available in Bison Book editions are The Southpaw, It Looked Like For Ever, and A Ticket for a Seamstitch, the other three volumes in the Henry Wiggen series.

Editorial Reviews

New York Times
"Bang the Drum Slowly makes wonderful reading—whether one hates baseball or loves it. . . . It is awfully funny in parts, and laughter is rare enough on anybody's bookshelf."—New York Times
Time
"What makes Bang the Drum Slowly unique . . . is Author Harris' mastery of his offbeat scene. . . . The talk is natural, larded with casual humor, earthiness and more than a touch of locker-room obscenity. . . . Harris has measured [the dimensions of his characters] with his heart as well as his eye and ear."—Time
New York Herald Tribune
"Bang the Drum Slowly is more than just another novel about baseball. It is about friendship, about the lives of a group of men as one by one they learn that a teammate is dying. Henry's dead-pan, vernacular account of life in the dugout is refreshing, lively and often uproariously funny. His reactions to his doomed friend are poignant and profoundly touching. Bang the Drum Slowly is a fine bitter-sweet book."—New York Herald Tribune
New York Times - George Vecsey
"[Bang the Drum Slowly] has one of the loveliest last lines in American literature, a regret from Wiggen for the way the players made fun of a slow-witted and now dead teammate: ‘From here on in, I rag nobody.’ We could all use that on our coat of arms."—George Vecsey, The New York Times
Chicago Tribune
Eric Simonson's beautifully imagined adaptation of Mark Harris' novel is in many ways the stage equivalent of a lusciously layered and moving work of prose literature, a marvel of simplicity in the depth of its feeling, while at the same time a profound reverie on the losing human contest against mortality...confronts death with complexity, never settling for easy sentiment, and is all the more stirring as a result.
Boston Herald
There's no denying the humor and power of the work, nor the audience's three-hankie response...a fascinating textural portrait of our national image.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803272217
Publisher:
University of Nebraska Press
Publication date:
04/01/1984
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
243
Product dimensions:
5.34(w) x 8.02(h) x 0.59(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Mark Harris (1922-2007).

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Bang the Drum Slowly 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Don't be turned off by the cover if you're not a baseball fan. The book is more enjoyable if you have some knowledge of the game, but it's not essential. It's a novel about an imaginary professional team, the New York Knights, in the 1950's, but baseball is just the setting. It's about living...and dying...and how the realization that we're all mortal changes everything. Written in the style of an average, less than eloquent man, it will make you laugh, make you think, and, quite possibly, make you cry.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Restricted land only invite people
mikehampen More than 1 year ago
It's about baseball, before the need for salary caps. It's also a story about friendship and family. This is a very good book. I highly recommend it!