Bank of the Black Sheep

Bank of the Black Sheep

4.5 2
by Robert Lewis
     
 

"A cracker of a novel . . . superbly edgy writing and terrific humour."—The Times (London)

Ex-PI Robin Llywelyn wakes up handcuffed to a hospice bed, full of morphine and with a fading memory as the cancer closes in. Unfortunately, he leaves a lot of loose ends. Prosecuted for crimes he can't remember committing and pursued by cops and criminals alike

Overview

"A cracker of a novel . . . superbly edgy writing and terrific humour."—The Times (London)

Ex-PI Robin Llywelyn wakes up handcuffed to a hospice bed, full of morphine and with a fading memory as the cancer closes in. Unfortunately, he leaves a lot of loose ends. Prosecuted for crimes he can't remember committing and pursued by cops and criminals alike, he discovers that a hidden fortune is waiting. Llywelyn's last case sees him in a race against the reaper to score the final haul.

Robert Lewis' previous books include The Last Llanelli Train and The Swansea Terminal.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
From the mesmerizing opening, in which Lewis adopts a second-person voice to facilitate the reader's identification with his protagonist's plight, until the satisfying conclusion, the author's third noir featuring Welsh PI Robin Llywelyn (after Swansea Terminal) fires on all cylinders. Llywelyn wakes up without knowing where he is, or who he is, only to learn that he has terminal cancer. While his condition does result in the dismissal of fraud charges against him, Llywelyn still faces the prospect of spending his remaining months in a depressing hospice. The investigator manages to sneak away to a local bar, where he receives a mysterious offer of work. That in turn leads to an opportunity on the wrong side of the law, which proves impossible for the dying man to resist. Gallows humor affords some slight leavening of the book's bleak, despairing worldview, one that James Ellroy fans will find familiar. (Mar.)
From the Publisher
"Relentlessly bleak, mordantly funny, and occasionally noirish, Lewiswrites brilliantly" -Booklist

"Bleakly funny, with a spectacularly flawed hero and a peculiarly uplifting (if gory) ending, Bank of the Black Sheep is a fitting conclusion to a sequence best described as extreme noir" -Guardian

"Llewellyn is the real deal... Lewis' coruscating analysis of underclass, underfoot, outcast Britain is uncomfortable and challenging" - Financial Times

"Robert Lewis' splendid creation Robin Llywelyn is a private eye of unsurpassed disintegration... a cracker of a novel... fizzy dialogue, superbly edgy writing and terrific humour" - The Times

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781846687457
Publisher:
Serpent's Tail Publishing Ltd
Publication date:
02/15/2011
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.70(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author

Robert Lewis was born in the Black Mountains, Wales. He spent his twenties getting sacked, living in bedsits, drinking in the sleazier pubs of various cities, and caring about the wrong things. Most of this is still going on.
He still thinks literature can save him, and he’s almost thirty now. He hasn’t seen it save anyone else. His first novel, The Last Llanelli Train was shortlisted for the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize for Comic Writing, along with Zadie Smith and Chrisother Brookmyre.

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Bank of the Black Sheep 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
AuthorAshleyDawn More than 1 year ago
Robin Llywelyn is a Private Detective, or at least that is what his card says. He has no memory, is handcuffed to the bed and in a hospice. When he is taken off his medication and told he has a short time to live, he is in shock. Confused and wanting answers, he contacts his doctor, attorney and eventually someone he shouldn't have! He finds out that he was charged with a crime, but the charges were dropped because of his medical condition. The problem is, he has no idea what the crime is and though several people allude to the fact that it involves money, no one tells him directly. When he realizes there are people looking for him and he may have given them the way to track him, he takes off. He finds bodies, uses bartenders and even has a lady interested in him. Along the way, Robin meets a cast of interesting characters. It seems everyone knows more about him than he does and it irritates him to say the least. He now has to get his memory back, evade the multiple players chasing him and discover exactly why everyone is after him, oh, and all of that before his cancer kills him. When he finally gets a decent lead on what he did, the race is on and he hopes to win! An intriguing read that gives great insight into how the mind works. The mystery will keep you guessing throughout! Reviewed by Ashley Wintters for Suspense Magazine
harstan More than 1 year ago
Alcoholic private investigator Robin Llywelyn wakes up chained to a hospital bed. He has no idea how he there or why he is chained though he suffers from a massive hangover. When Dfyed-Polis Police Constable Matt Roberts and Avon-CID Detective Inspector David Knight show him his business card, Robin does not recognize his own name. The morphine dripping into his arm has sedated his pain but turns his brain into mashed potatoes. The two cops leave with the salutation of "give my regards to the cancer". Later the Crown decides to not prosecute Robin who has no more than two months to live. Taking himself off the morphine so he can think straight, Robin needs a drink so he decides to leave the hospice and go on a date with another patient; as ironically his lungs failed him while his stewed liver did not. Llywelyn receives a package containing a letter, a gun and money, which gives him a second motive to leave the hospice as he realizes there is a fortune buried in Wales that people would die for to possesses; since he is dying he might as well possess it. The third Llywelyn incompetent investigative thriller (see The Last Llanelli Train and Swansea terminal) is a terrific satirical tale is over the top of Mount Snowdon, but fans who enjoy something different in their crime capers will not care. Fast-paced and filled with zingers, cops and robbers chase after the antihero, Bank of the Black Sheep is an intelligent jocular lampooning of the incompetent sleuth who allegedly makes a living by turning miraculously their chicken sh*t into a chicken dinner; Robin on the other hand succeeds at being a derelict. Harriet Klausner