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The Banquet
     

The Banquet

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by Dante Alighieri
 

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Dante has been called "the Father of the Italian language". In Italy, Dante is often referred to as il Sommo Poeta ("the Supreme Poet") and il Poeta; he, Petrarch, and Boccaccio are also called "the three fountains" or "the three crowns". Let those come to us -- whosoever they be -- who, pressed by the management of civil and

Overview

Dante has been called "the Father of the Italian language". In Italy, Dante is often referred to as il Sommo Poeta ("the Supreme Poet") and il Poeta; he, Petrarch, and Boccaccio are also called "the three fountains" or "the three crowns". Let those come to us -- whosoever they be -- who, pressed by the management of civil and domestic life, have felt the human hunger for True Knowledge . . . and let all of us sit together at one table -- for the Banquet! Written in his final days, after the completion of his masterful Divine Comedy, Dante Alighieri's The Banquet presents many of his most compelling thoughts as to how a life of maturity and civility should be conducted.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781607780458
Publisher:
MobileReference
Publication date:
01/01/2010
Series:
Mobi Classics
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
309 KB

Meet the Author


Durante degli Alighieri (1265 - 1321), was a major Italian poet of the Late Middle Ages. His Divine Comedy, originally called Comedìa and later christened Divina by Boccaccio, is widely considered the greatest literary work composed in the Italian language and a masterpiece of world literature. In the late Middle Ages, the overwhelming majority of poetry was written in Latin and therefore accessible only to affluent and educated audiences. In De vulgari eloquentia (On Eloquence in the Vernacular), however, Dante defended use of the vernacular in literature. He himself would even write in the Tuscan dialect for works such as The New Life (1295) and the aforementioned Divine Comedy; this choice, although highly unorthodox, set a hugely important precedent that later Italian writers such as Petrarch and Boccaccio would follow. As a result, Dante played an instrumental role in establishing the national language of Italy. --Wikipedia

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Banquet 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dont get this dumb book