Barchester Towers [Christmas Summary Classics]

Barchester Towers [Christmas Summary Classics]

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by Anthony Trollope
     
 

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Christmas Summary Classics
This series contains summary of Classic books such as Emma, Arne, Arabian Nights, Pride and prejudice, Tower of London, Wealth of Nations etc. Each book is specially crafted after reading complete book in less than 30 pages. One who wants to get joy of book reading especially in very less time can go for it.

About The Book

"Barchester

Overview

Christmas Summary Classics
This series contains summary of Classic books such as Emma, Arne, Arabian Nights, Pride and prejudice, Tower of London, Wealth of Nations etc. Each book is specially crafted after reading complete book in less than 30 pages. One who wants to get joy of book reading especially in very less time can go for it.

About The Book

"Barchester Towers" shares with "The Warden" the distinction of containing Trollope's most original, freshest, and best work, and in the character of Mr. Proudie a new specimen was added to English fiction. It was written for the most part in pencil, while the author was travelling about the country prosecuting his duties as a Post-office Surveyor, what was done being afterwards copied by the novelist's wife. The Barchester of the story has been identified as Winchester, and scattered at random throughout the work are many references to the neighbourhood of Hampshire's ancient capital.
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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781494329945
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
12/01/2013
Pages:
26
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.05(d)

Meet the Author

Anthony Trollope (1815-1882) was one of the most successful, prolific, and respected English novelists of the Victorian era. Some of his best-known books collectively comprise the Chronicles of Barsetshire series, which revolves around the imaginary county of Barsetshire and includes the books The Warden, Barchester Towers, Doctor Thorne, and others. Trollope wrote nearly 50 novels in all, in addition to short stories, essays, and plays.

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Barchester Towers 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
eBook, 2015 Read your Freebies, historical fiction read 1/10-1/13/2015 4 stars " The sorrows of our heroes and heroines, they are your delight, oh public!— their sorrows, or their sins, or their absurdities; not their virtues, good sense, and consequent rewards. When we begin to tint our final pages with couleur de rose, as in accordance with fixed rule we must do, we altogether extinguish our own powers of pleasing. When we become dull, we offend your intellect; and we must become dull or we should offend your taste" At almost 600 pages, this is a weighty tome. With its focus the mid 1800s British Anglican Church,aka the Church of England, its even heavier. However, Trollope, while taking on the polity if said church and all its foibles, makes what could be a dreary boring book a lot of fun and very humorous while introducing problems that are inate in human kind: we all stumble, we are all forgiven, and we all luve in an imperfect world. The names, in now hindsight introduce their character: Slope, Proudie, Grantly,Bold, Stanhope, Arabin, Harding, Quiverfill, Thorne....all well drawn characters in a soap opera to rival that of the original Upstairs,Downstairs. The profundity of their actions and pronouncements are dissected by Trollope as he speaks to the reader directly on occassion, to elaborate outside the situation, for good or not. Hence the quote above taken from the last chapter, as we catch our breath, from a death at the beginning that changes the characters and their interactions, to one near the end that makes it "all good", sliwly we follow these people through a season of change in response to life, as well as politics, polity, the role of women, and propriety. "Our doctrine", writes Trollope, "is that the author and the reader should move along together in full confidence with each other. Let the personages of the drama undergo ever so complete a comedy of errors among themselves, but let the spectator never mistake the Syracusan for the Ephesian; otherwise he is one of the dupes, and the part of a dupe is never dignified." This was an easier read than I had imagined, and very entertaining. It is my first Anthony Trollope book, read at the suggestion of a reviewer/ blogger I know who praises Trollope to the heavens. So, Simon, this review is for you
zylod More than 1 year ago
Great book, but this epub version is missing 15 chapters of the book....not the one to get...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago