Barenaked Ladies Are Me

Barenaked Ladies Are Me

4.0 2
by Barenaked Ladies
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Frank Zappa once asked the rhetorical question, "Does humor belong in music?" -- a query that any number of clever artists have tried to answer in the affirmative, only to be pigeonholed as novelty-mongers. These Canadians, however, avoid being tarred with that brush, due in no small part to their refusal to fall into pull-my-finger obviousness and an equal fluency in

Overview

Frank Zappa once asked the rhetorical question, "Does humor belong in music?" -- a query that any number of clever artists have tried to answer in the affirmative, only to be pigeonholed as novelty-mongers. These Canadians, however, avoid being tarred with that brush, due in no small part to their refusal to fall into pull-my-finger obviousness and an equal fluency in the language of the heart. The Ladies blend the two approaches nicely on this outing, perhaps the most democratic of their career, as it reflects an even spread of writing and lead singing credits. Fans of the band's wackier side will revel in the intricate twists and turns of "Bank Job," a slapstick crime tale replete with incompetent thieves and nuns in the crossfire. The funny bone also gets a tickle or two on "Wind It Up," a zippy ditty about cell phones and the geeks that abuse them. Barenaked Ladies Are Me also has its share of wistful moments, from the banjo-driven "Everything Has Changed," on which Steven Page pours out his heart about not being capable of pouring out his heart, to the ethereal "Vanishing," a showcase for Kevin Hearn's plaintive vocal style. Variety is also the order of the day in terms of sonics, with a sassy horn part adding swing to "Maybe You're Right" and some atmospheric keyboards adding to the go-for-baroque tone of "Rule the World with Love." Both diverse and immediately recognizable as a Barenaked Ladies recording, Are Me is equally for the fan and for the fan-to-be.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/12/2006
Label:
Warner Bros / Wea
UPC:
0093624435129
catalogNumber:
44351

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Barenaked Ladies   Primary Artist
Kim Mitchell   Electric Guitar,Soloist
Tyler Stewart   Drums,Background Vocals
Jim Creeggan   Vocals,Various
Steven Page   Guitar,Vocals
Terry Promane   Trombone
Kevin Turcotte   Trumpet
Kevin Hearn   Guitar,Keyboards,Vocals
Rob Carli   Tenor Saxophone
Robert Menegoni   Cymbals
Ed Robertson   Guitar,Vocals

Technical Credits

Barenaked Ladies   Audio Production
Susan Rogers   Engineer
Kevin Hearn   Engineer
Paul Forgues   Engineer

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Barenaked Ladies Are Me 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
"Some stupid number one hit single has got me in this mess!" The line from Barenaked Ladies' debut album, Gordon, proved prescient for the band following the success of "One Week" from their 1998 smash Stunt. The band had always crafted a whimsical blend of the somber and the comedic, yet they had garnered notoriety mostly for their humorous work, and the frenetic, pop culture-referencing song only further established them as a clever but glib band in the minds of critics and the general public. Set on surmounting the novelty band stigma, the Ladies toned down their customary quirkiness a bit on their next two albums--Maroon (2000) and Everything to Everyone (2003). However, Reprise sought to capitalize on more rapid-rhyming singles, releasing "Pinch Me" and "Another Postcard" as lead singles for the albums. "Pinch Me" reached #15 on the Hot 100 and Maroon went platinum, but the downright inane "Another Postcard" received little airplay, and Everything to Everyone sold poorly. Disappointed with Reprise's promotional support (or lack thereof), the band left their long-time label in 2004 to form Desperation Records. The common critical assessment of the band's new album, Barenaked Ladies Are Me, is that it's BNL's first "mature" album. Although such an assessment shows some critics' relative ignorance of Barenaked Ladies' entire work as well as an apparent forgetfulness of their own work (many writers hailed Maroon and Everything to Everyone as the band's "mature" albums), it's fair to say that a serious tone pervades the album. On songs like the acoustic-driven first single, "Easy," and the buoyant, sing-along-inducing "Bull in a China Shop," long-time songwriting partners Steven Page and Ed Roberston explore the familiar BNL themes of self-doubt and relationship complexities. Elsewhere the duo sharpen the political commentary that emerged on Everything to Everyone. The strongest of the politically-minded tracks (and perhaps the strongest song on the entire album) is "Maybe You're Right," which builds from sparse instrumentation to a resounding brass-filled finale. The album isn't devoid of BNL's trademark humor, though. On "Bank Job," a quirky waltz that could be the premise for a Cohen brothers' film, Robertson sings of a heist stymied by one of the robber's "crisis of conscience" when the bank is full of nuns. And, on "Wind It Up," the album's southern-rock closer, Robertson delivers possibly the funniest line of the album: "I was a baby when I learned to suck/But you have raised it to an art form." Keyboardist Kevin Hearn and bassist Jim Creeggan also contribute some songwriting, with Hearn penning the Queen-esque "Sound of Your Voice" (sung by Page) and "Vanishing," and Creeggan providing "Peterborough and the Kawarthas." Hearn's songwriting contributions, including two other tracks on the deluxe edition, are his most prolific with the band, but his soft, colorless vocals are an acquired taste. Despite many fans welcoming the band's continuing departure from fallacious ditties (No songs about postcards with chimps? Hallelujah!), some prefer early-era BNL (Gordon to be specific) and will no doubt be disappointed with the scarcity of BNL's customary hyperactivity. Of the thirteen tracks, only a handful could really be considered "peppy." Given that the band had written plenty of uptemo songs during the recording sessions--songs like "Running Out of Ink," "Down to Earth," and "Maybe Not," all of which are available on the deluxe edition of the album--one has to assume BNL consciously pursued a mellow vibe. The album doesn't really hit toe-tapping territory until the third song, "Sound of Your Voice," and two songs--the opening track "Adrift" and "Vanishing--are peaceful to
Anonymous More than 1 year ago