Barrack Room Ballads

Barrack Room Ballads

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by Rudyard Kipling
     
 

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"The Barrack-Room Ballads" is a collection of songs and poems by Rudyard Kipling. They deal chiefly with the late-Victorian British Army and are primarily written in a vernacular dialect. This compendium contains some of Kipling's most famous work, and includes the poems "Gunga Din", "Tommy" and "Danny Deever". This wonderful and seminal collection of poems would make

Overview

"The Barrack-Room Ballads" is a collection of songs and poems by Rudyard Kipling. They deal chiefly with the late-Victorian British Army and are primarily written in a vernacular dialect. This compendium contains some of Kipling's most famous work, and includes the poems "Gunga Din", "Tommy" and "Danny Deever". This wonderful and seminal collection of poems would make for a great addition to any bookshelf, and is certainly not to be missed by fans and collectors of Kipling's work. The poems contained herein include: Danny Deever; Tommy; Fuzzy-Wuzzy; Soldier, Soldier; Screw-Guns; Cells; Gunga Din; Oonts; Loot; 'Snarleyow'; The Widow at Windsor; Belts; The Young British Soldier; Mandalay; Troopin'; The Widow's Party, etcetera. Many vintage books such as this are increasingly scarce and expensive, and it is with this in mind that we are republishing this volume now, in an affordable, high-quality, modern edition. It comes complete with a specially commissioned biography of the author.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781443722193
Publisher:
Hesperides Press
Publication date:
11/28/2008
Pages:
80
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.31(d)

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Barrack-Room Ballads 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
soljerblue More than 1 year ago
I've been reading Kipling since I was much younger than now, and am quite familiar with the esoteric slang of the Victorian British army. But I'm sure the specific meanings of many words and phrases, such as "Aggy Chel," and "pukka", and others seen throughout Kipling's work are totally lost on modern-day readers. This edition by Dodo Press does nothing to correct the problem. It uses no footnotes nor other explanations for these 19th century colloquialisms. The result is to stop the reader in mid-stanza with a puzzled look, and force him or her to try to work it out from the context of the piece, or scratch their heads and move on. Either way, the vitality of Kipling's work, and the reader's enjoyment of it are needlessly interrupted. This and other modern editions of Kipling's work need footnotes. And editors with enough professionalism to learn their meanings and include those in the text. It ain't rocket science, folks. Really it's not!
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