Barrel of Laughs: A Vale of Tears

Overview

'Prince Roger sets out eagerly on a quest and finds a few adventures, a lot of friends, a damsel or two in distress (not!) and himself, in the end. A 'carrier of joy' whose mere presence causes everyone to laugh uncontrollably, Roger finds cruelty and kindness equally amusing, and expects his quest to be a lark. It's anything but: As Roger passes through the Forever Forest, nearly starves at the Dastardly Divide, sees people at their worst in the Valley of Vengeance, and temporarily despairs in the Mountains of Malice, he sobers up, learns to ...

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Overview

'Prince Roger sets out eagerly on a quest and finds a few adventures, a lot of friends, a damsel or two in distress (not!) and himself, in the end. A 'carrier of joy' whose mere presence causes everyone to laugh uncontrollably, Roger finds cruelty and kindness equally amusing, and expects his quest to be a lark. It's anything but: As Roger passes through the Forever Forest, nearly starves at the Dastardly Divide, sees people at their worst in the Valley of Vengeance, and temporarily despairs in the Mountains of Malice, he sobers up, learns to care for others, becomes an expert peacemaker, does Good Deeds, and falls in love with Lady Sadie, who says what she thinks as she repeatedly saves his bacon.'—K. 'Feiffer's worldly-wise, confiding tone and sense of the absurd are highly congenial, and the drawings are a vintage Feiffer delight.'—Publishers Weekly.

100 Books for Reading and Sharing 1995 (NY Public Library)

Prince Roger is sent on a quest, the purpose of which is to turn the carefree young prince into a sober man and worthy monarch. Roger gets everything wrong--except for the meaning of life, and that he gets right.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
An inordinately cheerful prince embarks on a quest for greater gravity. "Feiffer's worldly-wise, confiding tone and sense of the absurd are highly congenial, and the drawings are a vintage Feiffer delight," said PW. All ages. Apr.
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
Feiffer's second children's book is a free wheeling fantasy, or as Feiffer puts it, a tale "about a man who goes on a quest that turns into chaos and comes out changed. I'm a great believer in chaos bringing good fortune," he adds. The hero is Prince Roger, who amuses those around him so much that they fall down laughing. That is until resident wizard, J. Wellington Wizard, sends Roger on a quest from the Forever Forest, through the Dastardly Divide, on to the Valley of Vengeance, across the Sea of Screams and the Mountain of Malice. The quest is full of twist, turns, and a host of wonderful characters and Roger struggles to understand himself and the strange world around him. Everything he sees and everyone he meets impacts him until he emerges a more contemplative person who, in the middle of his happily ever after, realizes "that in his lifetime there might be a hundred more quests, quests of all kinds waiting out there to be found."
Children's Literature - Tim Whitney
Roger makes everyone laugh. Kings, wizards, peasants, and even animals cannot stop themselves from cracking up when Roger is around. But Roger's gift of inspiring laughter is not becoming of a prince, so his father good King Whatchamacallit and J. Wellington Wizard send Roger on a quest to become a more serious person and a more worthy monarch. Although Roger does everything wrong on his great quest, he does get the meaning of life right. The reader is reminded of Jon Sciezka's writing as the characters disobey the author's wishes in this fairy tale of nonsensical humor. The story is delightfully funny, with a message about life at the end.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-7Feiffer has taken a six-frame comic strip and turned it into a 180-page book geared toward an elementary crowd but not written on their level. Prince Roger is uncontrollably hilarious, so the king who only speaks spoonerisms gets his wizard to send Roger on an undefined quest so the kingdom can get respite from all that arduous laughing. The alliterative Feiffer gives Roger a variety of way stations on his quest for his quest, including the Forever Forest from which there is no escape, the Dastardly Divide from which there is no escape, the Valley of Vengeance etc., etc. An autonomous fellow, Tom, a simple hunter, literally walks in and out of the bookand in and out of troubleand along the way changes from Roger's best friend to his bittersweet enemy. Rounding out the cast are a ``plainspoken'' lady-in-waiting; a beautiful princess; a clumsy, lovelorn giant; and a ``serene'' sorceress. There's some semblance of a bona fide plot here revolving around Roger's adventures, but the intrusive omniscient author quickly grows tiresome and the jokes too often fall maddeningly flat. Feiffer's delightful line drawings and quirky imagination just can't save this sprawling story.John Sigwald, Unger Memorial Library, Plainview, TX
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062059260
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/28/1998
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 360,041
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 750L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 6.75 (w) x 8.87 (h) x 0.41 (d)

Meet the Author

Jules Feiffer has won a number of prizes for his cartoons, plays, and screenplays, including the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning. His books for children include The Man in the Ceiling, A Barrel of Laughs, A Vale of Tears, I Lost My Bear, Bark, George, and Meanwhile... He lives in New York City. In His Own Words...

"I have been writing and drawing comic strips all illy life, first as a six-year-old, when I'd try to draw like my heroes: Alex Raymond, who did Flash Gordon, E. C. Segar, who did Popeye, Milton Caniff, who did Terry and the Pirates. The newspaper strip back in the I 1940s was a glorious thing to behold. Sunday pages were full-sized and Colored broadsheets that created a universe that could swallow a boy whole.

"I was desperate to be a cartoonist. One of my heroes was Will Eisner, who did a weekly comic book supplement to the Sunday comics. One day I walked into his office and showed him my samples. He said they were lousy, but lie hired me anyway. And I began my apprenticeship.

"Later I was drafted Out of Eisner's office into tile Korean War. Militarism, regimentation, and mindless authority combined to squeeze the boy cartoonist Out Of me and bring out the rebel. There was no format at the time to fit [he work I raged and screamed to do, so I had to invent one. Cartoon satire that commented on the Lin military the Bomb, the Cold War, the hypocrisy of grownLIPS, the mating habits of urban Young men and women, these were my subjects. After four years of trying to break into print and getting nowhere, the Village Voice, the first alternative newspaper, offered to publish me. Only one catch: They couldn't Pay me. What (lid I care?

"My weekly satirical strip, Sick Sick Sick, later renamed Feiffer started appearing in late 1956. Two years later, Sick Sick Sick came out in book form and became a bestseller. The following years saw a string of cartoon collections, syndication, stage and screen adaptations of the cartoon. One, Munro, won an Academy Award.

"This was heady stuff, taking me miles beyond my boyhood dreams. The only thing that got in the way of my enjoying it was the real world. The Cuban missile crisis, the assassination of President Kennedy, the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights revolution. The country was coining unglued and my weekly cartoons didn't seem to be an adequate way of handling it. So I started writing plays: Little Murders, The White House Murder Case, Carnal Knowledge, Grownups. All the themes of my comic strips expanded theatrically and later, cinematically to give me the time and space I needed to explain the times to myself and to my audience.

"I grew older. I had a family, and late in life, a very young family. I started thinking, as old guys will, about what I wanted these children to read, to learn. I read them E.B. White and Beverly Cleary and Roald Dahl, and, one day, I thought, I ley, I can do this."

"Writing for young readers connects me profess sionally to) a part of myself that I didn't know how to let out until I was sixty: that kid who lived a life of innocence, mixed with confusion and consternation, disappointment and dopey humor. And who drew comic strips and needed friends—and found them—in cartoons and children's books that told him what the grown-ups in his life had left out. That's what reading (lid for me when I was a kid. Now, I try to return the favor."

Jules Feiffer has won a number of prizes for his cartoons, plays, and screenplays, including the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning. His books for children include The Man in the Ceiling, A Barrel of Laughs, A Vale of Tears, I Lost My Bear, Bark, George, and Meanwhile... He lives in New York City. In His Own Words...

"I have been writing and drawing comic strips all illy life, first as a six-year-old, when I'd try to draw like my heroes: Alex Raymond, who did Flash Gordon, E. C. Segar, who did Popeye, Milton Caniff, who did Terry and the Pirates. The newspaper strip back in the I 1940s was a glorious thing to behold. Sunday pages were full-sized and Colored broadsheets that created a universe that could swallow a boy whole.

"I was desperate to be a cartoonist. One of my heroes was Will Eisner, who did a weekly comic book supplement to the Sunday comics. One day I walked into his office and showed him my samples. He said they were lousy, but lie hired me anyway. And I began my apprenticeship.

"Later I was drafted Out of Eisner's office into tile Korean War. Militarism, regimentation, and mindless authority combined to squeeze the boy cartoonist Out Of me and bring out the rebel. There was no format at the time to fit [he work I raged and screamed to do, so I had to invent one. Cartoon satire that commented on the Lin military the Bomb, the Cold War, the hypocrisy of grownLIPS, the mating habits of urban Young men and women, these were my subjects. After four years of trying to break into print and getting nowhere, the Village Voice, the first alternative newspaper, offered to publish me. Only one catch: They couldn't Pay me. What (lid I care?

"My weekly satirical strip, Sick Sick Sick, later renamed Feiffer started appearing in late 1956. Two years later, Sick Sick Sick came out in book form and became a bestseller. The following years saw a string of cartoon collections, syndication, stage and screen adaptations of the cartoon. One, Munro, won an Academy Award.

"This was heady stuff, taking me miles beyond my boyhood dreams. The only thing that got in the way of my enjoying it was the real world. The Cuban missile crisis, the assassination of President Kennedy, the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights revolution. The country was coining unglued and my weekly cartoons didn't seem to be an adequate way of handling it. So I started writing plays: Little Murders, The White House Murder Case, Carnal Knowledge, Grownups. All the themes of my comic strips expanded theatrically and later, cinematically to give me the time and space I needed to explain the times to myself and to my audience.

"I grew older. I had a family, and late in life, a very young family. I started thinking, as old guys will, about what I wanted these children to read, to learn. I read them E.B. White and Beverly Cleary and Roald Dahl, and, one day, I thought, I ley, I can do this."

"Writing for young readers connects me profess sionally to) a part of myself that I didn't know how to let out until I was sixty: that kid who lived a life of innocence, mixed with confusion and consternation, disappointment and dopey humor. And who drew comic strips and needed friends—and found them—in cartoons and children's books that told him what the grown-ups in his life had left out. That's what reading (lid for me when I was a kid. Now, I try to return the favor."

Biography

Born the Bronx in 1929, Jules Feiffer got his first taste of the artistic accolades that were to come his way in the form of a gold medal awarded to him at the age of five in a school art contest. His love of art persisted throughout his childhood -- and after forging a career as a Pulitzer Prize-winning political cartoonist, he would find success writing and illustrating books for children himself.

After high school, Feiffer’s talent for drawing led him to the Art Students League of New York and later earned him admittance to Brooklyn’s renowned Pratt Institute. His first paying job as a cartoonist was under the tutelage of idol Will Eisner, the famous father of the classic 1940s cartoon, “The Spirit.” Feiffer’s apprenticeship and fledgling comic strip career were interrupted, however, when he was drafted into the Army. There, he spent what little free time he was allowed doodling sketches with a decidedly anti-military bent, and his famous “Munro” character -- a four-year-old boy drafted into the Army by mistake -- was born.

After serving his time in the Army, Feiffer developed the comic strip Sick, Sick, Sick: A Guide to Non-confident Munro, which was later renamed, simply, Feiffer. The strip appeared regularly in publications from The Village Voice to The New York Times from 1956 to 1997, and Feiffer’s trademark style -- stark, scribbled figures emoting against a white background -- was promptly adopted by political cartoonists around the world. In April of 1958, an animated rendition of Sick, Sick, Sick won an Academy Award in the Short-Subject Cartoon category, and in 1996, Feiffer was awarded the Pulitzer for his biting editorial cartoons.

Feiffer's knack for capturing the turmoil of his times carried over from cartoons into other media. His play Little Murders -- a wry exploration of violence in urban life -- garnered several accolades when it was presented in 1967, among them the London Theatre Critics, Outer Circle Critics and Obie Awards. As New York Times theater reviewer Clive Barnes commented, "[Feiffer] muses on urban man, the cesspool of urban man's mind, the beauty of his neurosis, and the inevitability of his wilting disappointment." Feiffer's other plays include White House Murder Case (1970) and Anthony Rose (1990). In addition, Feiffer wrote the screenplays for several feature films, most notably Carnal Knowledge (1971) and Popeye (1980).

Feiffer’s motivation to write his first children’s book, according to legend, came from good old-fashioned spite. The story goes that a longtime friend of Feiffer's (who he won’t name) came up with a concept for a children's book based on their shared love of the movies. Feiffer agreed to hand over the illustrating duties to his friend and give writing it a shot, and toughed out every line. When he called the friend to report on his progress, Feiffer found out -- to his fury -- that his friend had decided to write it himself. Although his friend later apologized, Feiffer decided that in the end, they should each do their own books. He changed the subject of his work in progress from the movies to comic books, and The Man in the Ceiling -- a semi-autobiographical tale bout a boy and his love for drawing -- was born.

Selected by Publishers Weekly as one of the best children's books of 1993, the book was a runaway hit with kids and parents. Feiffer continued writing for his new, less jaded audience, offering up A Barrel of Laughs, A Vale of Tears (1998), I Lost My Bear (1998), Meanwhile… (1999), Bark, George (1999), I’m Not Bobby!, (2000) By the Side of the Road (2001), and The House Across the Street (2002). Far from the stark stencils that are his political cartoons, his children’s illustrations wriggle with life, their curvier lines in no way softening the lessons within.

Good To Know

Feiffer is the only cartoonist to have a comic strip published by The New York Times.

A fan of comic strips from an early age, Feiffer started to draw at the age of six. His favorites were Flash Gordon, Popeye, and Terry and the Pirates.

Feiffer didn't want Jack Nicholson cast for the lead in the 1971 film Carnal Knowledge, for which he wrote the screenplay. Director Mike Nichols fought Feiffer on the casting and finally convinced him to approve the up-and-coming actor.

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    1. Hometown:
      New York, New York
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 26, 1929
    2. Place of Birth:
      New York, New York
    1. Education:
      The Pratt Institute, 1951

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One



The Hunter of Boar or Stag



Roger had a strange effect on people.



Take this guy. See how grumpy he is?

He's been grumpy since he got out of bed, stepped on his little boy'sbeach ball, slid halfway across the house, and flew out the window intothe rosebush. Wouldn't you be grumpy with a dozen thorns in your head?

Don't get too interested in this character. He's in our story just as anexample and we'll leave him forever in nine pages.

Now here is our guy trekking through the forest, hunting boar or huntingstag—something like that-because that's what men did in Roger's day.They got up in the morning and said, "Wife, I am going out to hunt," andWife said, "What will you bring home today, Husband, boar or stag? " Andthe man of the house would reply, "Whatever," because it really didn'tmatter: all food tasted the same (not too good) in those days. Ketchuphadn't been invented.

So he's trekking through the woods-trek, trek, trek-a big frown on hisface because he's thinking: "Why does everything happen to me? First Itrip on my kid's ball, get a crownful of thorns, stub my toe on thedoorsill, get laughed at by my wife who calls me a clumsy oaf, which Iam, but if she truly loved me she wouldn't say so. I hate mywife—er—that is, my life. I also hate hunting boar or stag. I shouldhave been a blacksmith. Thank the Lord that in eight more pages I'll beout of this book forever!"

He's thinking all this garbage when, for no reason at all,

the frown leaves his face.

He treks still another five yards and, for no reason at all, hegrins from ear to ear.

He treks another five yards and, for no reason at all, he smiles.

And he feels wonderful, better than he has since he won last year's sackrace at the Peasants' Picnic.

Now, although I've written "for no reason at all"-and repeated ittwice-there was a reason. The hunter didn't realize that Roger wastrekking toward him from the opposite direction.

And the closer Roger got to him, the more cheerful the hunter became.That was the effect Roger had on people. He made them feel good.

He didn't do anything to make them feel good. He didn't tell jokes. Hedidn't try to please-he didn't have to: he was a prince.

Roger was the son of kindly King Whatchamacallit. And, being a prince,he had the right to be stern, haughty, and bad-tempered. Except hecouldn't be, because he didn't know what it was to be stern, haughty, orbad-tempered. He had never seen any examples. He had never seen hisfather, the king, throw a fit, or his dear departed mother, the queen,stamp her foot in anger. Nor had he seen out of sorts any of the king's ministers, courtiers, chefs,servants, maids, or lackeys. Not once since his birth had he heard anangry scream, shout, curse, or quarrel. Not once had he seen a tear,unless it was tears of joy. And of those he saw many.

Because Roger was a carrier of joy, he spread it before him. It glowedoff his presence like the rays of the sun. He was a special delight tohis mother, and the thought of this he found particularly gratifyingbecause of her sudden demise. Out for a swim one day, she'd beenswallowed by a blue whale.

He missed his mother, but whales were his favorite mammal and blue washis favorite color, so, if she had to go, that didn't seem like such abad way. After a while, Roger came to smile at the thought of that bluewhale on that bright green sea gulping down his mother in a redstripedswimming costume as if she was a candy cane. Everything in life amusedRoger. Here he is waking up in the morning.

This is the morning he planned to go horseback riding on the royalgrounds. But it's a terrible day. It's raining. Not only is it raining,it's sleeting and hailing at the same time. Hailstones, sounding likegunshots, bounce off the palace walls. So what does Roger say to himselfas he looks out the window? He says: "Wow! I'll get drenched to myloincloth in two seconds flat if I go out in this. I can't wait!"

He doesn't go back to bed and read a royal book or magazine as anyprince in his right mind might do. He goes out and gets soaked andslapped around by hailstones and-if you can believe it-he has a goodtime.

Everything, significant or insignificant, gave Roger a good time.Brushing his teeth gave him a good time. Eating and sleeping gave him agood time. Sport amused him: hunting, archery, jousting. Kindness amusedhim, but no more than cruelty. Fat people, skinny people, rich people,poor people, vagrants, all caused him to giggle. People who lived incastles with dozens of servants they couldn't keep track of, this gavehim a good laugh.

Roger's remarkably high spirits cast a spell over anyone or anything whocame within a half mile of him.

Dogs ceased chasing cats.

Cats quit chasing birds. Birds were charmed out of the trees and stoppedhunting worms.

Worms curled and uncurled in spasms of glee.

And laughing hyenas laughed so extra-hard they had to stuff their mouthswith dead branches and foul-tasting foliage in order to regain theircomposure.

By now, you get the picture. And here's our friend, the hunter, back inthe picture.

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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 18, 2010

    A Barrel of Laugh, A Vale of Tears

    Since I was a little kid, A Barrel of Laughs, A Vale of Tears by Jules Feiffer has been one of my favorite books. This book has laughs, problems, solutions, love, twists, and happy endings. Jules Feiffer paints a picture in your head, and sometimes, even talks right to you.
    Roger is a prince, but he has a problem. Everyone he meets, even animals, burst out laughing when they see him. Roger finds this, and everything else, hilarious. His father, King Whatchamacallit, does not like this, or in his words "like not this does". He thinks that Roger lacks the ability to take the throne. J. Wellington Wizard, the king's old wizard, sends Roger on a quest through the forever forest. This is supposed to turn Roger from a laughingstock to a worthy heir to the throne. J. Wellington also sends a bag of magic powder with Roger so that if he needs to, he will transform into something else to avoid causing outbreaks of laughter. He never knows what he will be. Roger has to overcome a mountain of obstacles to complete his quest, which through a surprising turn of events, does not turn out as expected.
    I have loved this book from the moment I first read it. It has humor, fantasy, and a really good storyline. I definitely recommend this book for someone, like me, who loves to laugh.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 23, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    A profound coming-of-age tale disguised as a funny children's story

    This story reads as a parody of medieval fiction, but hidden within are excellent lessons on friendship, maturity, responsibility, character, change, destiny, and mentoring.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2005

    GREAT

    I read it in class and it was Terrfic I reccimend to everybody that is at least 6 and above!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2002

    Eccentric and Funny

    It was extraordinarily funny in some parts,yet it lacked something in other parts of the book. Still, Jules Feiffer is a very witty author and I enjoyed reading this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2002

    Wonderful read!

    I believe that is one of the best books to sit down with for a good chuckle. Very little of it is dull and the way he digs things up out of the plot that you have almost forgotten is delightful. I suggest you read it in a short period of time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2000

    AwEsOmE!!!!!

    The best book I have ever read.Great for all ages.I share it with friends ans family.They all love it to.I'm looking into more books by Jules Feiffer.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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    Posted April 26, 2010

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    Posted June 11, 2010

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    Posted October 26, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

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