Bartók: Piano Music

Bartók: Piano Music

by Jenö Jandó
     
 

For anyone who believes Bartók is all string dissonances and folk music, this CD will dispel any myths. Known as a piano legend in his country even when young, Bartók composed pieces that, here, Jenö Jandó performs with great passion, elegance, and taste. It is almost shocking to hear something so turn-of-the-century and See more details below

Overview

For anyone who believes Bartók is all string dissonances and folk music, this CD will dispel any myths. Known as a piano legend in his country even when young, Bartók composed pieces that, here, Jenö Jandó performs with great passion, elegance, and taste. It is almost shocking to hear something so turn-of-the-century and Chopin- or Liszt-like as Bartók's "Four Piano Pieces," but they are a pure joy to hear. The sweeping, majestic "Study for the Left Hand" is stately and emotional yet with slight reserve. Jandó brings out each swell in the "Fantasy 1," and plays with impeccable phrasing. "Fantasy 2" is sweet and sensitive. The most exciting movement, the Scherzo, is stirring, with incredible attention to the accents and rhythm and perfect rubato as the music necessitates. Jandó's piano is a bright, clean instrument that records well. The "Petits morceaux" are tender, showing another side of the pianist's emotional range. It is in the "Two Elegies for Piano" that one begins to hear a different sensibility emerge in Bartók's work, for they branch out into a broader tonality and a deeper exploration of tone color. It was a wise decision to show Bartók's work chronologically, so as to allow the listener to note the composer's unique character and moving away from a standard Western sound. The "First Term at the Piano," made up of 27 tiny movements, is a somewhat odd choice for an album. As one might surmise, they have a schoolchild feel, as they are indeed used even today to instruct beginners at the piano. But they progress somewhat in complexity. The simple, pure counterpoint of No. 6: Moderato leads to the Bach chorale-like No. 8: Andante and No. 13: Hol jártál; the No. 11: Menuett is indeed a minuet but with a distinctively Hungarian kick; and the syncopated rhythms of No. 17: Allegro deciso are wonderful. Perhaps it says something of an artist of Jandó's stature, that though he can play difficult repertoire like the "Four Piano Pieces" so movingly, he also brings careful attention and humility to the "First Term at the Piano." ~ V. Vasan

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Product Details

Release Date:
08/30/2011
Label:
Naxos
UPC:
0747313237678
catalogNumber:
8572376
Rank:
315098

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. The First Term at the Piano (Kezdok zongoramuzsikáya), teaching pieces (18) for piano, Sz. 53/BB 66  - Béla Bartók  - Jenö Jandó
  2. Elegies (2) (Két elégia), for piano, Sz. 41, BB 49 (Op.8b)  - Béla Bartók  - Jenö Jandó
  3. Petits morceaux, for piano (free arrangement of songs BB 37/2 and BB 24/1), BB 38  - Béla Bartók  - Jenö Jandó
  4. Marche funèbre from "Kossuth", for piano, DD 75b  - Béla Bartók  - Jenö Jandó
  5. Pieces (4) for piano, BB 27, DD 71  - Béla Bartók  - Jenö Jandó

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