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Bartleby, the Scrivener
     

Bartleby, the Scrivener

4.3 4
by Herman Melville
 

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The narrator, an elderly lawyer who has a very comfortable business helping wealthy men deal with mortgages, title deeds, and bonds, relates the story of the strangest man he has ever known.

The narrator already employs two scriveners, Nippers and Turkey. Nippers suffers from chronic indigestion, and Turkey is a drunk, but the office survives because in the mornings

Overview

The narrator, an elderly lawyer who has a very comfortable business helping wealthy men deal with mortgages, title deeds, and bonds, relates the story of the strangest man he has ever known.

The narrator already employs two scriveners, Nippers and Turkey. Nippers suffers from chronic indigestion, and Turkey is a drunk, but the office survives because in the mornings Turkey is sober even though Nippers is irritable, and in the afternoon Nippers has calmed down even though Turkey is drunk

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781494418359
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
12/09/2013
Pages:
54
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.11(d)
Age Range:
14 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 - September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, writer of short stories, and poet from the American Renaissance period. The bulk of his writings was published between 1846 and 1857. Best known for his sea adventure "Typee" (1846) and his whaling novel "Moby-Dick" (1851), he was almost forgotten during the last thirty years of his life. Melville's writing draws on his experience at sea as a common sailor, exploration of literature and philosophy, and engagement in the contradictions of American society in a period of rapid change. Melville's way of adapting what he read for his own new purposes, scholar Stanley T. Williams wrote, "was a transforming power comparable to Shakespeare's".

Born in New York City, he was the third child of a merchant in French dry-goods who went bankrupt. After the death of his father in 1832, his formal education stopped abruptly and the young man briefly became a schoolteacher. He then signed on as a common sailor for a merchant voyage to Liverpool in 1839. A year and a half into his first whaling voyage, in 1842 he jumped ship in the Marquesas Islands, where he lived among the natives for a up to a month. He described these experiences in his first book, "Typee" (1846), a best-seller, as was the sequel, "Omoo" (1847). The same year Melville married Elizabeth Knapp Shaw; their four children were all born between 1849 and 1855.

In August 1850, Melville moved to a farm near Pittsfield, Massachusetts, where he established a profound but short-lived friendship with Nathaniel Hawthorne. "Moby-Dick" (1851) was not welcomed by readers or reviewers, and the cool reception of "Pierre" (1852) put an end to his career as a popular author. From 1853 to 1856 he wrote short fiction for magazines, collected as "The Piazza Tales" (1856). In 1857, Melville voyaged to England and the Near East and "The Confidence-Man" appeared, the last prose work published during his lifetime. From then on Melville turned to poetry. Having secured a position of Customs Inspector in New York, his poetic reflection on the Civil War appeared as "Battle-Pieces and Aspects of the War" (1866).

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
August 1, 1819
Date of Death:
September 28, 1891
Place of Birth:
New York, New York
Place of Death:
New York, New York
Education:
Attended the Albany Academy in Albany, New York, until age 15

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Bartleby the Scrivener 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A fantastic story. A true classic from Herman Melville. Really enjoyable.
mitchellenglish More than 1 year ago
To: Mr. Rowe, English 11 Herman Melville’s "Bartleby the Scrivener" mixes comedy and reality with absurdity and superfluous behavior. Bartleby, the main character, is a unique individual who has complete disconnect from reality. His oblivious behavior and style is a testament to this. He eats nothing but chestnuts and has no engagement with sleep. On the contrary, he keeps the book interesting by displaying his lack of respect toward authority. He would “prefer not to”. The story is based upon the theme of absurdity with reality. Bartleby was chosen by the narrator, a law firm owner, to be his assistant scrivener (law copier) because of his work ethic and reposed behavior. However, unfortunately Bartleby decides to stay content with doing nothing, literally nothing; standing in the corner of the room all day and night. It is recommended that this piece of literature be on your bucket list as a part of America’s great and iconic literary works. Melville truly captured absurdity in "Bartleby the Scrivener".
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The writing is NOTHING like Moby Dick. Really an interesting short story!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Unfortunately, I was never able to open the book once I paid for it. This seems to be an ongoinng problem when I purchase anything through this site. I was forced to go elsewhere and purchase the book in paperback. The book itself was very good.