Baseball: A History of America's Favorite Game

Baseball: A History of America's Favorite Game

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by George Vecsey, Stephen Armstrong
     
 

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One of the great bards of America's Grand Old Game, George Vecsey, gives a rousing account of the sport, from its pre-Republic roots to the present day. Baseball is a testament to the unbreakable bond between our nation's pastime and the fans, who've remained loyal despite the fifty-year-long interdict on black athletes, the Black Sox scandal, franchise relocation,…  See more details below

Overview

One of the great bards of America's Grand Old Game, George Vecsey, gives a rousing account of the sport, from its pre-Republic roots to the present day. Baseball is a testament to the unbreakable bond between our nation's pastime and the fans, who've remained loyal despite the fifty-year-long interdict on black athletes, the Black Sox scandal, franchise relocation, and the use of performance-enhancing drugs by some of today's major stars. Reverent, playful, and beautifully written, Baseball begs to be read in the span of a rain-delayed doubleheader but is so satisfying that one hopes it never ends.

Editorial Reviews

Baseball is a storyteller's game. Its pace and steadily building suspense seem designed for artful recollection; it's no wonder that the diamond sport has attracted wordsmiths like Roger Angell, David Halberstam, and George Vecsey, the author of this book. In this Modern Library Chronicles book, the New York Times sports columnist writes about the long, majestic history of our National Pastime. As always, his writing is relaxed, exact, and graceful, sure proof of his affection for a great game.
Publishers Weekly
New York Times sports columnist Vecsey (Year in the Sun) devotes himself to this sprightly history of the national pastime. His survey unfolds much like a highlights tape, with a breezy background narrative of the game from its pre-Civil War roots to its current drug scandals, structured around set pieces spotlighting the outsized deeds of luminaries like Babe Ruth, Jackie Robinson, Branch Rickey and George Steinbrenner. He finds plenty of time for color commentary, like an appreciation of radio announcers' whimsical homerun catch-phrases (" `Get up Aunt Minnie and raise the window!' " Pirates voice Rosey Roswell was wont to yell), cantankerous opinionating ("Trying to be fair and neutral about it, I can only say that the designated hitter rule is a travesty and ought to be tossed out") and ruminations on the ultimate metaphysical question of "why the Yankees exist." Throughout, the author stresses the game's continuities: modern-day anxieties about free agentry, labor strife and the bereavement of cities abandoned by their teams for greener pastures have plagued baseball from the beginning. Vivid, affectionate and clear-eyed, Vecsey's account makes for an engaging sports history. (Aug. 15) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781428115354
Publisher:
Recorded Books, LLC
Publication date:
11/15/2006

Meet the Author

George Vecsey, a sports columnist for The New York Times, has written about such events as the FIFA World Cup and the Olympics but considers baseball, the sport he’s covered since 1960, his favorite game. He is the author of more than a dozen books, including Loretta Lynn: Coal Miner’s Daughter (with Loretta Lynn), which was made into an Academy Award—winning film. He has also served as a national and religion reporter for The New York Times, interviewing the Dalai Lama, Tony Blair, Billy Graham, and a host of other noteworthy figures. He lives in New York with his wife, an artist.

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