The Baseball Hall of Shame: Young Fans' Edition

The Baseball Hall of Shame: Young Fans' Edition

by Bruce M. Nash, Allan Zullo
     
 

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It's time to give discredit where discredit is due.

For over a century, baseball has immortalized the home run slugger, the clean-cut All-American, the golden glover, the big-hearted lug, the unstoppable dynasty. But the truth is winners and nice guys and heroes are boring.

Who really makes the grand old game so entertaining, rousing, and exciting? The

Overview

It's time to give discredit where discredit is due.

For over a century, baseball has immortalized the home run slugger, the clean-cut All-American, the golden glover, the big-hearted lug, the unstoppable dynasty. But the truth is winners and nice guys and heroes are boring.

Who really makes the grand old game so entertaining, rousing, and exciting? The losers, the cheaters, the flakes, the buffoons, the boneheads, the inept, the outrageous, the obnoxious. They have given real demeaning to the word baseball. They have brought color to the game -- a black eye. They are the true foul balls whose contributions have withstood the detest of time.

Yet where is their niche in the Hall of Fame? Nowhere. To correct this travesty of sports injustice, we founded The Baseball Hall of SHAME. Cooperstown can have baseball's shining stars. The Hall of SHAME wants baseball's shiners.

The history of our national pastime boasts a rich heritage of shameful moments both on and off the field by teams, players, managers, coaches, owners, general managers, umpires, groundskeepers, and even the fans themselves.

To help us choose the most deserving candidates for Baseball Hall of SHAME dishonors, we made a nationwide appeal in the spring of 1984 to fans, sportswriters, broadcasters, and players for nominations. We spread the word on radio from coast to coast and throughout Canada. We went on TV and were interviewed in scores of newspapers and magazines. We visited spring training camps where we received nominations in the bleachers, clubhouses, dugouts, and press boxes. Then we spent weeks sifting through record books, archival material, and faded newspaper accounts. We considered all shameful moments and tossed out those which involved drugs or murder since there's nothing funny about either. However, most everything else shameful had a chance of being selected for dishonors.

Not everyone who blundered on or off the field belongs in The Baseball Hall of SHAME. In our judgment, only a small select number of the thousands of boners and disgraces that have tainted the game met our unique standards for inclusion in the Hall's first induction.

However, we don't intend to stop here. Periodically, we will be considering prospective Hall of Shamers from the past and present for enshrinement. If you feel some baseball personality or moment is deserving of such dishonors, we want to know about it. Please send us your nominations of hilarious happenings and ignoble incidents. To learn how to submit your picks, turn to page 187.

We want The Baseball Hall of SHAME to be the fans' shrine. We're not out to make fun of baseball. Instead, we want to have fun with the game we all love. This book is more than just the official record of charter membership in The Baseball Hall of SHAME. It's also a way for fans across the country to pay a light-hearted tribute to the national pastime. We have found that superstars and bozos have one thing in common -- they all screw up. (It's just that some screw up more than others.)

As you read through this book, we hope you come to the same conclusion we did. We can all identify with -- and laugh about -- each inductee's shameful moment because each one of us has at one time or another pulled a "rock."

Copyright © 1985 by Nash and Zullo Productions, Inc.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In the first and second volumes of this series, Nash and Zullo presented most of the best-known blunders and bloopers in baseball history; in this title they recount lesser-known incidents, many of which are either silly and fun or verge on the bizarre but are nonetheless fodder for any baseball fan. In ``Playoff Lovers,'' the authors quote interviews with fans and journalists in attendance who swear they saw a couple making love on the crowded field in the pandemonium following New York Giant Bobby Thomson's 1951 playoff home run against the Dodgers. Boston Red Sox manager Eddie Kasko is ``inducted'' into the Hall of Shame for having faked a faint in protest of an umpire's call in 1972. (He was immediately thrown out of the game.) In ``Bullpen Bozos,'' the authors recount the time that former Dodger reliever Ron Perranoski squirted a water pistol at a boy who asked for an autograph. Pepper Martin is honored for the 1938 game in which he threw the ball at the heads of each of the opposing team's runners who hit the ball to him at third base. Recommended for spring training. (March)
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8 --Every possible baseball blunder from the earliest days of the game to the recent past is described in this collection of baseball's worst moments. No one is spared; the expected descriptions of mental lapses, errors, bad breaks, and bizarre events on the playing field are covered. The authors also delve into the mistakes of managers, owners, umpires, front-office personnel, and even groundskeepers. It all gets to be a bit tedious in a straight read-through, and some of the descriptions that should be short, snappy, and entertaining miss the mark. This is meant to be a book for browsers, however--the type of book baseball fans who like this sort of thing will share with others who may or may not want to listen. With that in mind, the faults can be overlooked. A motherlode of baseball history for fans who collect anecdotes like baseball cards. --Todd Morning, Schaumburg Township Pub . Lib . , IL

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780671693541
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/15/1990
Edition description:
Young Edition
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
4.18(w) x 6.76(h) x 0.41(d)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

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