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Baseball in April and Other Stories
     

Baseball in April and Other Stories

3.7 11
by Gary Soto
 

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In this unique collection of short stories, the small events of daily life reveal big themes--love and friendship, youth and growing up, success and failure. Calling on his own experiences of growing up in California's Central Valley, poet Gary Soto brings to life the joys and pains of young people everywhere. The smart, tough, vulnerable kids in these stories are

Overview

In this unique collection of short stories, the small events of daily life reveal big themes--love and friendship, youth and growing up, success and failure. Calling on his own experiences of growing up in California's Central Valley, poet Gary Soto brings to life the joys and pains of young people everywhere. The smart, tough, vulnerable kids in these stories are Latino, but their dreams and desires belong to all of us.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Diaz and Gongora give Soto's heartfelt collection just the right spark of Latino flavor in this sharp audio production. From Jesse, a nine-year-old struggling to improve his baseball skills in "Baseball in April" to Veronica, who is crushed when her new, much cherished Barbie doll is ruined, Soto introduces vivid characters who struggle with the longing, hope and acceptance that are part of everyday life. Soto's accessible writing voice and poetic language permeate these 11 tales of first dates, worries about one's looks and the difficulties of dealing with idiosyncratic family members. With the help of solid performances (and crisp pronunciation of the smattering of Spanish words and phrases) by Diaz and Gongora, listeners will take away a real sense of what it was like for many Mexican-American kids growing up in California's Central Valley (including Fresno, Soto's hometown) not so many years ago. Ages 10-up. (Jan.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Children's Literature - Lois Rubin Gross
A short story collection that resists the stereotypes of troubled Latino kids, although the children are unmistakably part of their Mexican-American community. The characters that populate this book are bright, motivated youngsters trying to sort out the problems that all young people have with family, school, and friends. From the girl who is given more freedom than she is ready for, to the boy who begs to enroll in expensive karate classes and finds them to be less valuable than he had thought, these are children experiencing universal emotions that will easily speak to readers of all ethnicity's. 1998 (orig.
Los Angeles Times Book Review
[Soto's] sensitivity to young people's concerns and his ability to portray the world as it is perceived by children is nothing less than remarkable.
The Boston Globe
A fine collection of stories that offers a different cultural perspective about feelings common to all teenagers. Soto writes well and with tremendous insight into the process of growing up.
The Horn Book
Will strike chords of recognition in readers of all ages.
From the Publisher
"Gary Soto is an astute observer of the desires, fears, and foibles of children and teenagers going about the business of daily living. In these eleven vignettes featuring Mexican American families, the character portrayals are gentle; the tone is quiet and somewhat bittersweet; and respect for family is a consistent value. This illumination of the everyday will strike chords of recognition in readers of all ages."—The Horn Book

"[Soto's] sensitivity to young people's concerns and his ability to portray the world as it is perceived by children is nothing less than remarkable." — Los Angeles Times Book Review

"A fine collection of stories that offers a different cultural perspective about feelings common to all teenagers. Soto writes well and with tremendous insight into the process of growing up." — The Boston Globe

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780833574008
Publisher:
Turtleback Books
Publication date:
04/28/2000
Pages:
111
Product dimensions:
5.32(w) x 7.75(h) x 0.60(d)
Lexile:
830L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
"[Soto's] sensitivity to young people's concerns and his ability to portray the world as it is perceived by children is nothing less than remarkable."—Los Angeles Times Book Review
"A fine collection of stories that offers a different cultural perspective about feelings common to all teenagers. Soto writes well and with tremendous insight into the process of growing up."—The Boston Globe
"Will strike chords of recognition in readers of all ages."—The Horn Book

Meet the Author

Gary Soto 's first book for young readers, Baseball in April and Other Stories, won the California Library Association's Beatty Award and was named an ALA Best Book for Young Adults. He has since published many novels, short stories, plays, and poetry collections for adults and young people. He lives in Berkeley, California. Visit his website at www.garysoto.com .

Customer Reviews

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Baseball in April and Other Stories 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
stm2 More than 1 year ago
A great book! Universal in its stories about kids. Being in the neighborhood or being home alone for the first time. A must read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cindy-Lou129 More than 1 year ago
Never ever read this book! this is the stupidist book in the universe and a insult to human nature. This book is a HUGE waste of time and paper AND money! do not read this stupid book. read twilight. Twilight is the best book ever made. It is so cool. Do NOT waste your time and money on this book read twilight instead, its 999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999X 9999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999 better than this book. Partly because it does NOT talk about a whole bunch of Mexican hobos problems. i mean who wants to hear about that. Now please do NOT read this book or if you do your are a retard, a f
JosephSimard More than 1 year ago
I think this story is good because i play baseball and the two characters in this story are trying to make the team and they both make it but one of the brothers is pretty bad and the other brother is good so the the weaker brother gets more playing time than the stronger player. So all of a sudden the stronger player does'nt come anymore so i think the weaker player is better than the stronger player. I would reccommend this book to guys who play baseball like me.
83hockey More than 1 year ago
My name is Levi Weber and I picked Baseball in April to read for class. There are a lot of different stories in this book. I did not see that there is really a plot. ANd every chapter has a different main character and most of the settings were different too. The second story of the book I liked the most. I was about a little girl and her friend that were playing with there barbies and one of the barbies heads feel off. The girls were fighting and the friend made the head fall off. They never played together again after that. I think that this story was trying to teach us that a barbies head is not worth losing a friend over. The author of the stories was good at keeping you interested and made you want to read more. When he talked about outdoors he would tell you about the sky and the breeze and make you feel it. When I was done with the book I realized that each story had a little lesson to learn and that I would tell my friend to read this book.
RyanGreelis More than 1 year ago
Baseball in April and other Short Stories was a spirit lifting novel with various stories. the main story "Baseball in April" was a motivating story showing even little kids never quit. Two brothers, Micheal and Jesse attempt to make their dreams come true as they try out for the town baseball team. Shamed with disappointment Micheal and Jesse are cut. They continue to play the sport they love with each other proving to each other their high value. Urged to be put on by their friends, the coach decides to put them on the team. Their hope had never failed and it shows as they achieve their dream. Gary Soto explores the mind with stories of love, disappointment, death, and happiness. Soto provokes old memories of the readers past using his teenager memories in southern California. Each of his stories tell a tell of adventure and magnets for compassion as those young teens live the time of their lives. After laying the book down, Soto makes the reader feel good deep inside and is a great book to put you in a great mood.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Baseball in April and Other Stories by Gary Soto- There are many stories in this book, including the main story: 'Baseball in April'. The theme of 'Baseball in April' is teenagers finding a way to play baseball when they could not make the major team. Jesse and Michael, the main characters, do not make the major team in their town and they get an invitation to play somewhere else. Jesse and Michael head to baseball tryouts, where Jesse does not do well at all, but Michael performs brilliantly. Both are rejected from the team, so they have to find a way to play because they want to stay active and they love baseball. I liked Baseball in April and Other Stories because the kids find a way to succeed instead of giving up. I learned that if you don't make a team or something doesn't happen in your favor that there is still a way to make things happen. I would recommend this book to anybody of any age because it has many short stories with many life lessons flooding out of them.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I discovered Gary Soto's poetry in a public library in Nebraska. Then I read his short stories, my favorite being 'Baseball in April.' Like his poetry, these stories are beautiful in that they reveal a child's inner thought life they also show the challenges that teenagers go through. Soto takes us back to his childhood in California. The stories occur in sunny Fresno, which is in the Central Valley. The characters, dilemmas, and emotions that he evokes are so real that I often read them over saying, 'Yes, I remember feeling like that.' I mostly read adult literature but have been reading a lot in young adult literature, because I often forget what it was like to be a young boy. Soto has a gift for recalling these events and making them come alive again. I've read this collection three times and have read all of Soto's poetry. I hightly recommend 'Baseball in April,' as well as the poetry collection 'Black Hair.'