Baseball in the District "An Orphan in an Upstart League" 1900 to 1904 [NOOK Book]

Overview

“Baseball in the District,” is the name we have assigned to our project to document the early baseball history for Washington DC. This book documents the cities early years in the American League. The book follows a detailed chronological narrative, every game is covered. This is how the player’s were viewed during their times. Information about the players is presented to give you a unique view of the season. Local papers and sporting publications are used in order to give the reader a perspective of the era. Historical events are presented as
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Baseball in the District

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Overview

“Baseball in the District,” is the name we have assigned to our project to document the early baseball history for Washington DC. This book documents the cities early years in the American League. The book follows a detailed chronological narrative, every game is covered. This is how the player’s were viewed during their times. Information about the players is presented to give you a unique view of the season. Local papers and sporting publications are used in order to give the reader a perspective of the era. Historical events are presented as they happened.

Our series to date

1877 to 1885 Renaissance
1888 Robert Hewitt Joins the Great Majority
1889 Ward Sold
1890 to 1891 The Dark Ages
1892 to 1899 The Wagner Years
1900 to 1904 An Orphan in an Upstart League
1918 Uncle Sam’s Game

Oh, the twists and turns of history, could Griffith Stadium in Washington instead have been named Navin Park. Or imagine the fans in the District rooting for the Washington Dodgers.

What if the National Athletic Company had succeeded? The Trust would have ruled not only all of baseball but all other professional sports.

This book chronicles the arrival of the American League in the District. The story begins in 1900, one year after the demise of the city’s National League franchise. It covers the abortive attempt to establish a second major league and the trials and tribulations of 1901 when not one but two leagues try to field teams in Washington. What follows is the struggle of an orphaned team under the control of Ban Johnson who would rather have it run by his friends then the locals.

1905. Jimmy Manning does not want to manage the inaugural 1901 team but submits to Ban Johnson’s will. He quickly becomes a fan favorite but bucks Johnson when he wants to spend the money to build a winning franchise. 1902 dawns with the “Only Del,” Ed Delehanty, the premier baseball slugger and three other players raided from the Phillies. But high hopes come crashing down.

Ed Delehanty causes national headlines when in the signs with the New York Giants in the post season having gone into debt playing the ponies. He is finally assigned to Washington but he reports out of shape and despondent. The 1903 Senators will have not one but two players die during the season and the popular Win Mercer will take his life.

In 1904 the Senators reoccupy the old National’s Park but forget to pay the contractor. The season is a disaster and the local shareholders revolt. Never a dull moment in the District!

The words are written by those who watched them unfold. The book is chronological. It follows the Senators from the early spring practice, through the season and into the post-season. Line-ups and reviews are included for most games.

Emphasis is on the players. Stars like Win Mercer, Jimmy Ryan and Ed Delehanty get coverage. But others like Rabbit Robinson, Maude Nelson, Irv Waldron and the Hillebrand’s get their due. While a baseball book the text, the book is 556 pages long, there are references to current events, like the 1902 coal strike or celebrities like Hannah Elias.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940015604818
  • Publisher: Kevin and Karen Flynn
  • Publication date: 9/21/2012
  • Series: Baseball in the District , #3
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 735 KB

Meet the Author

Karen and Kevin live with their cat Snugglebunny. Avid fans they enjoy taking in a game. They write for the DC Baseball History web site.
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 5, 2013

    Karen and Kevin Flynn did a wonderful bringing to life the baseb

    Karen and Kevin Flynn did a wonderful bringing to life the baseball affairs that were going on in the District in the early 1890’s. As I read the book, Baseball in the District The Dark Ages 1890 and 1891, I could very easily imagine what it was like to be a baseball fan in the nation’s capital at that time.

    The Flynn’s must have spent hundreds of hours doing research for this book and I for one appreciate their efforts. I believe I am like a lot of Washington baseball fans when I say I know a fair amount about 20th century baseball in D.C. but not so much about 19th century baseball.

    After reading the Flynn’s book I learned very quickly that Washington baseball fans have had some very bad and poorly managed baseball teams to root for in the early 1890’s.

    I recommend this book to all baseball fans that appreciate the history of baseball in the nation’s capital.

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