Baseball's Pivotal Era, 1945-1951

Baseball's Pivotal Era, 1945-1951

by William Marshall
     
 

ISBN-10: 0813120411

ISBN-13: 9780813120416

Pub. Date: 02/28/1999

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

With personal interviews of players and owners and with over two decades of research in newspapers and archives, Bill Marshall tells of the players, the pennant races, and the officials who shaped one of the most memorable eras in sports and American history.

At the end of World War II, soldiers returning from overseas hungered to resume their love affair with

…  See more details below

Overview

With personal interviews of players and owners and with over two decades of research in newspapers and archives, Bill Marshall tells of the players, the pennant races, and the officials who shaped one of the most memorable eras in sports and American history.

At the end of World War II, soldiers returning from overseas hungered to resume their love affair with baseball. Spectators still identified with players, whose salaries and off-season employment as postmen, plumbers, farmers, and insurance salesmen resembled their own. It was a time when kids played baseball on sandlots and in pastures, fans followed the game on the radio, and tickets were affordable. The outstanding play of Joe DiMaggio, Stan Musial, Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Don Newcombe, Warren Spahn, and many others dominated the field. But perhaps no performance was more important than that of Jackie Robinson, whose entrance into the game broke the color barrier, won him the respect of millions of Americans, and helped set the stage for the civil rights movement.

Baseball's Pivotal Era, 1945-1951 also records the attempt to organize the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Mexican League's success in luring players south of the border that led to a series of lawsuits that almost undermined baseball's reserve clause and antitrust exemption. The result was spring training pay, uniform contracts, minimum salary levels, player representation, and a pension plan—the very issues that would divide players and owners almost fifty years later.

During these years, the game was led by A.B. "Happy" Chandler, a hand-shaking, speech-making, singing Kentucky politician. Most owners thought he would be easily manipulated, unlike baseball's first commissioner, the autocratic Judge Kennesaw Mountain Landis. Instead, Chandler's style led one owner to complain that he was the "player's commissioner, the fan's commissioner, the press and radio commissioner, everybody's commissioner but the men who pay him."

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780813120416
Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
Publication date:
02/28/1999
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
528
Product dimensions:
6.42(w) x 9.54(h) x 1.55(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
1Winds of Change3
2"No One Is Qualified"14
31945: Season of Hope28
4The Mexican Baseball Revolution45
5Murphy Money and More64
61946: Season of Tumult83
7Durocher Finishes Last101
8Jackie Robinson's America120
91947: Season of Fury151
10Miracle on Lake Erie169
11Ownership Has Its Privileges185
121948: Indian Summer210
13Gardella's Folly231
14A Stepchild in Peril, The Minors250
151949: Pinstripes Prevail270
16"Who Were Those Guys?"291
17The Great Triumvirate and Other Stars319
181950: Year of the Whiz Kids351
19Chandler's Waterloo375
201951: "The Shot Heard 'Round the World"397
21Baseball Then and Now426
Notes441
Sources490
Index496

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >