Basic Concepts in Sociology

Basic Concepts in Sociology

by Max Weber
     
 

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Basic Concepts in Sociology presents in one volume the essence of Weber's thinking.

The contents include:

  • On the concept of sociology and the meaning of social conduct
  • Characteristic forms of social conduct
  • The concept of social relationship
  • Types of social conduct: usage, custom
  • The concept of legitimate authority
  • Types of

Overview

Basic Concepts in Sociology presents in one volume the essence of Weber's thinking.

The contents include:

  • On the concept of sociology and the meaning of social conduct
  • Characteristic forms of social conduct
  • The concept of social relationship
  • Types of social conduct: usage, custom
  • The concept of legitimate authority
  • Types of legitimate authority: tradition, faith, law
  • The concept of struggle
  • Communalization and aggregation of social relationships
  • Open and closed social relationships
  • Accountability for social conduct: representation
  • The concept of the corporate group and its types
  • The concepts of power and domination
  • Types of religious and political corporate groups

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780806503042
Publisher:
Kensington
Publication date:
06/28/2000
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
123
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 8.30(h) x 0.40(d)

Meet the Author

Max Weber, a German political economist, legal historian, and sociologist, had an impact on the social sciences that is difficult to overestimate. According to a widely held view, he was the founder of the modern way of conceptualizing society and thus the modern social sciences. His major interest was the process of rationalization, which characterizes Western civilization—what he called the "demystification of the world." This interest led him to examine the three types of domination or authority that characterize hierarchical relationships: charismatic, traditional, and legal. It also led him to the study of bureaucracy; all of the world's major religions; and capitalism, which he viewed as a productof the Protestant ethic. With his contemporary, the French sociologist Emile Durkheim—they seem not to have known each other's work—he created modern sociology.

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