The Basic Fault: Therapeutic Aspects of Regression [NOOK Book]

Overview

In this volume, Michael Balint, who over the years made a sustained and brilliant contribution to the theory and technique of psychoanalysis, develops the concept of the 'basic fault' in the bio-psychology structure of every individual, involving in varying degree both mind and body. Balint traces the origins of the basic fault to the early formative period, during which serious discrepancies arise between the needs of the individual and the ...
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The Basic Fault: Therapeutic Aspects of Regression

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Overview

In this volume, Michael Balint, who over the years made a sustained and brilliant contribution to the theory and technique of psychoanalysis, develops the concept of the 'basic fault' in the bio-psychology structure of every individual, involving in varying degree both mind and body. Balint traces the origins of the basic fault to the early formative period, during which serious discrepancies arise between the needs of the individual and the care and nurture available. These Discrepancies create a kind of deficiency state.

On the basis of this concept, Balint assumes the existence of a specific area of the mind in shich all the processes have an exclusively two-person structure consisting of the individual and the individual's primary object. Its dynamic force, originating from the basic fault has the overwhelming aim of 'putting things right'. This area is contrasted with two others: the area of the Oedipus complex, which has essentially a triangular structure comprising the individual and two of his objects, and whose characteristic dynamism has the form of a conflict; and the area of creation, in which there are no objects in the proper sense, and whose characteristic force is the urge to create, to produce
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781134963768
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 4/15/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 224
  • File size: 450 KB

Meet the Author

 
Michael Balint, M.D., Ph.D., M.Sc., who died in 1971, was a psychoanalyst of international reputation, whose originality expressed itself both in clinical practice and in teaching. His involvement with the development of psychoanalytic theory and practice was paralleled by a concern with stimulating understanding of psychodynamic principles among other professional groups, particularly general practitioners. His varied and prolific writings attest to these aims.

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Table of Contents

Foreword
Preface to the 1979 Reprint
Preface
Pt. I The three areas of the mind
1 The therapeutic processes and their localization 3
2 Interpretation and working-through 8
3 The two levels of analytic work 11
4 The area of the basic fault 18
5 The area of creation 24
6 Summary 28
Pt. II Primary narcissism and primary love
7 Freud's three theories 35
8 Inherent contradictions 40
9 Clinical facts about narcissism 46
10 Schizophrenia, addiction, and other narcissitic conditions 52
11 Ante-natal and early post-natal states 59
12 Primary love 64
13 Adult love 73
Pt. III The gulf and the analyst's responses to it
14 Regression and the child in the patient 79
15 The problem of language in upbringing and in psychoanalytical treatment 92
16 The classical technique and its limitations 99
17 The hazards inherent in consistent interpretation 104
18 The hazards inherent in managing the regression 110
Pt. IV The benign and the malignant forms of regression
19 Freud and the idea of regression 119
20 Symptomatology and diagnosis 127
21 Gratifications and object relationships 133
22 The various forms of therapeutic regression 138
23 The disagreement between Freud and Ferenczi, and its repercussions 149
Pt. V The regressed patient and his analyst
24 Therapeutic regression, primary love, and the basic fault 159
25 The unobtrusive analyst 173
26 Bridging the gulf 182
Bibliography 189
Special bibliography on oral dependence and related states 195
Index 197
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