Basic Laboratory Methods for Biotechnology / Edition 1

Other Format (Print)
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$62.55
(Save 25%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $5.00
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 94%)
Other sellers (Other Format)
  • All (10) from $5.00   
  • New (3) from $59.38   
  • Used (7) from $5.00   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$59.38
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(278)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$65.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(177)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$65.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(177)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

This manual provides a systematic and very practical introduction to the bioscience laboratory. It will serve both as a primary text for undergraduate students preparing for a career in biotechnology and as a reference for laboratory professionals. It includes coverage of:

  • Math in the laboratory
  • Preparing solutions
  • Measurements
  • Safety
  • Separations
  • Using computers in the lab
  • Quality control
  • Data analysis

Reviews necessary math; disc. computer use, quality control, data analysis; solution preparation, measurement, separation

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
This manual provides a systematic and practical introduction to the bioscience laboratory. Seidman (biotechnology laboratory technician program, Madison Area Technical College) and Moore (biological sciences, Illinois State U.) present nine units that discuss an introduction to the workplace, product quality control, math, data analysis, safety, measurements, solutions, separation methods, and computers in the biotechnology lab. Spiral binding. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780137955350
  • Publisher: Benjamin Cummings
  • Publication date: 1/19/2000
  • Format: Spiral Bound
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 751
  • Product dimensions: 9.11 (w) x 10.72 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

LISA SEIDMAN received her Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin and has taught for over twelve years in the Biotechnology Laboratory Technician Program at Madison Area Technical College, Madison, Wisconsin.

CYNTHIA MOORE received her doctoral degree from Temple University School of Medicine and has a career both in research and as a science educator. She is currently a faculty member in the Department of Biological Sciences at Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois.

The authors welcome comments and feedback from readers. You can e-mail Lisa Seidman at lseidman@madison.tec.wi.us and Cynthia Moore at cjmoor1@ilstu.edu.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Preface

This is an exciting time to work in biotechnology. The Human Genome Project is generating fundamental genetic information at a breathtaking rate; basic research findings are being applied in medicine, agriculture, and the environment; and a variety of new biotechnology products are moving into production. Behind each of these accomplishments are teams of scientists and technicians whose everyday work makes such achievements possible.

For the past twelve years, we have been working with students who are beginning their careers as technicians and bench scientists in biotechnology laboratories. In order to best assist our students, we, and our colleagues elsewhere in the United States, have explored what entry level biotechnologists do at work and what abilities they need to perform this work. We have been impressed with the complexity and diversity of technical roles and responsibilities, and the importance of the skills that bench workers bring to their jobs. This book emerges partly from our experiences working with students and our explorations into the nature of the laboratory workplace*.

This book also results from our personal experiences in the laboratory. As graduate students we struggled to master the "laboratory lore" that was passed among "post-docs" and graduate students in a not always coherent chain. Some of what is in this book is the systematic introduction to laboratory lore that we wish we had received.

The result of our efforts is not a laboratory manual; this text contains few step-by-step procedures. Nor is it a book about molecular genetics, immunology, or cell culture—there are already many excellent specialized texts andmanuals on these topics. This book rather is a textbook/reference manual on basic laboratory methods and the principles that underlie those methods. These basics are important to every biotechnologist, regardless of whether one is cloning DNA or purifying proteins, whether one is working in an academic setting or is employed in a company.

We intend this book to assist students preparing to become biotechnology laboratory professionals, those who already work in the laboratory, and biology students who are learning to operate effectively in the laboratory. Others who may also find this book helpful include high school teachers and their advanced students, and industry trainers. We have endeavored to make this text accessible to beginning college students with a limited science and math background. Some sections, such as the math review in Unit III, could be skipped or skimmed by more experienced readers. At the same time as we tried to make this book practical and accessible, we also endeavored to provide enough background theory so that readers will understand the methods they use and will be prepared to solve the unavoidable problems that arise in any laboratory.

Although we focus on the biotechnology laboratory, the majority of topics we cover are of importance to individuals working in any biology laboratory. A few topics, such as quality regulations and standards, are included because they are important for those working in biotechnology companies. As biotechnology companies mature, their focus shifts from research into commercial production. As this maturation occurs, scientists and technicians often find that they must add terms like "GMP", "ISO 9000", and "quality systems" to their technical vocabulary. This book therefore weaves a conversation about regulations and standards into many chapters.

We are aware that the basic methods in this book (such as how to mix a solution or weigh a sample) are less glamorous than learning how to manipulate DNA, or how to clone a sheep. However, we also know that, in practice, the most sophisticated and remarkable accomplishments of biotechnology are possible only when the most basic laboratory work is done properly.

*The results of some of these discussions about the biotechnology workplace are summarized in the National Voluntary Skill Standards Documents in Agricultural Biotechnology and the Biosciences. (FFA, "National Voluntary Occupational Skill Standards: Agricultural Biotechnology Technician," National FFA Foundation, Madison, WI, 1994 and "Gateway to the Future, Skill Standards for the Bioscience Industry," Education Development Center, Newton, MA, Inc., 1995.)

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

I. INTRODUCTION TO THE BIOTECHNOLOGY WORKPLACE.

 1. Biotechnology and the Workplace.

 2. Introduction to a Safe Workplace.

 3. Biotechnology and the Regulation of Medical and Food Products.

II. PRODUCT QUALITY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY.

 4. Introduction to Product Quality Systems.

 5. Documentation: The Foundation of Quality.

 6. Quality Systems in the Laboratory.

 7. Quality Systems in the Production Facility.

III. MATH IN THE BIOTECHNOLOGY LABORATORY: AN OVERVIEW.

 8. Basic Math Techniques.

 9. Proportional Relationships.

10. Relationships and Graphing.

IV. DATA IN THE LABORATORY.

11. Descriptions of Data.

12. The Collection of Meaningful Data; Avoiding Errors in the Laboratory.

V. LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS.

13. Introduction to Quality Laboratory Measurements, Tests, and Assays.

14. Introduction to Instrumental Methods and Electricity.

15. The Measurement of Weight.

16. The Measurement of Volume.

17. The Measurement of Temperature.

18. The Measurement of pH, Selected Ions, and Conductivity.

19. Measurements Involving Light A: Basic Principles and Instrumentation.

20. Measurements Involving Light B: Applications and Methods.

VI. LABORATORY SOLUTIONS.

21. Preparation of Laboratory Solutions A: Concentration Expressions and Calculations.

22. Preparation of Laboratory Solutions B: Basic Procedures and Practical Information.

23. Laboratory Solutions to Support the Activity of Biological Macromolecules andIntact Cells.

24. Solutions: Associated Procedures and Information.

VII. BASIC SEPARATION METHODS.

25. Introduction to Filtration.

26. Introduction to Centrifugation.

27. Introduction to Bioseparations.

VIII. SAFETY IN THE LABORATORY.

28. Working Safely in the Laboratory: General Considerations and Physical Hazards.

29. Working Safely with Chemicals.

30. Working Safely with Biological Materials.

IX. COMPUTERS IN THE LABORATORY.

31. Computers: An Overview.

32. Data Handling with Computers.

33. Telecommunications and the Internet.

Read More Show Less

Preface

This is an exciting time to work in biotechnology. The Human Genome Project is generating fundamental genetic information at a breathtaking rate; basic research findings are being applied in medicine, agriculture, and the environment; and a variety of new biotechnology products are moving into production. Behind each of these accomplishments are teams of scientists and technicians whose everyday work makes such achievements possible.

For the past twelve years, we have been working with students who are beginning their careers as technicians and bench scientists in biotechnology laboratories. In order to best assist our students, we, and our colleagues elsewhere in the United States, have explored what entry level biotechnologists do at work and what abilities they need to perform this work. We have been impressed with the complexity and diversity of technical roles and responsibilities, and the importance of the skills that bench workers bring to their jobs. This book emerges partly from our experiences working with students and our explorations into the nature of the laboratory workplace*.

This book also results from our personal experiences in the laboratory. As graduate students we struggled to master the "laboratory lore" that was passed among "post-docs" and graduate students in a not always coherent chain. Some of what is in this book is the systematic introduction to laboratory lore that we wish we had received.

The result of our efforts is not a laboratory manual; this text contains few step-by-step procedures. Nor is it a book about molecular genetics, immunology, or cell culture—there are already many excellent specialized texts and manuals onthese topics. This book rather is a textbook/reference manual on basic laboratory methods and the principles that underlie those methods. These basics are important to every biotechnologist, regardless of whether one is cloning DNA or purifying proteins, whether one is working in an academic setting or is employed in a company.

We intend this book to assist students preparing to become biotechnology laboratory professionals, those who already work in the laboratory, and biology students who are learning to operate effectively in the laboratory. Others who may also find this book helpful include high school teachers and their advanced students, and industry trainers. We have endeavored to make this text accessible to beginning college students with a limited science and math background. Some sections, such as the math review in Unit III, could be skipped or skimmed by more experienced readers. At the same time as we tried to make this book practical and accessible, we also endeavored to provide enough background theory so that readers will understand the methods they use and will be prepared to solve the unavoidable problems that arise in any laboratory.

Although we focus on the biotechnology laboratory, the majority of topics we cover are of importance to individuals working in any biology laboratory. A few topics, such as quality regulations and standards, are included because they are important for those working in biotechnology companies. As biotechnology companies mature, their focus shifts from research into commercial production. As this maturation occurs, scientists and technicians often find that they must add terms like "GMP", "ISO 9000", and "quality systems" to their technical vocabulary. This book therefore weaves a conversation about regulations and standards into many chapters.

We are aware that the basic methods in this book (such as how to mix a solution or weigh a sample) are less glamorous than learning how to manipulate DNA, or how to clone a sheep. However, we also know that, in practice, the most sophisticated and remarkable accomplishments of biotechnology are possible only when the most basic laboratory work is done properly.

*The results of some of these discussions about the biotechnology workplace are summarized in the National Voluntary Skill Standards Documents in Agricultural Biotechnology and the Biosciences. (FFA, "National Voluntary Occupational Skill Standards: Agricultural Biotechnology Technician," National FFA Foundation, Madison, WI, 1994 and "Gateway to the Future, Skill Standards for the Bioscience Industry," Education Development Center, Newton, MA, Inc., 1995.)

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)