The Basket Ball by Esme Raji Codell, Jennifer Plecas |, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
The Basket Ball

The Basket Ball

by Esme Raji Codell, Jennifer Plecas
     
 

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Lulu prefers playing basketball to playing with dolls. So when the boys won’t let her join their school-yard team, she decides to host a Basket Ball—where ball gowns are traded in for sequined basketball jerseys and high-top heels! Girls travel from all over the world to attend the ball, shooting hoops, showing off their skills, and forming a league of

Overview

Lulu prefers playing basketball to playing with dolls. So when the boys won’t let her join their school-yard team, she decides to host a Basket Ball—where ball gowns are traded in for sequined basketball jerseys and high-top heels! Girls travel from all over the world to attend the ball, shooting hoops, showing off their skills, and forming a league of their own.

Bestselling and award-winning author Esmé Raji Codell has crafted an action-packed, slam-dunk picture book that will appeal to girlie girls and sporty girls alike.

The book includes a glossary of basketball terms.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Lulu is living proof that one can be both girly and athletic. "Lulu messed with makeup./ Lulu played with dolls./ But most of all, our Lulu liked to shoot her basketballs." Her male schoolyard peers won't let her play, so Lulu takes matters into her own hands, inviting "go-to girls with game" from around the world to a fete where they celebrate, compete, and end up forming their own league. Plecas's (Pretend) sweet watercolor illustrations effortlessly capture the global cast and exude an authentic eagerness, but she's saddled with a story that doesn't make much sense. Codell's (Fairly Fairy Tales) paean to self- and collective-actualization feels like it's about a generation or so late to the party: nowadays, athletic girls have plenty of feminine role models, and even young girls can find basketball leagues that are happy to have them. Finally, the idea that aspiring, dedicated athletes like the ones Lulu invites would show up to play a game they love in skirts and "high top heels" is more demeaning than it is funny or touching. Ages 4�8. (Sept.)
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—Lulu's passion is shooting hoops. She tears up the court, but the boys won't allow her on their team. Undeterred, Lulu invites sporty girls from around the world to attend a Basket Ball. Plecas's affable ink, watercolor, and gouache illustrations feature a multicultural team of sports enthusiasts who arrive in a basketball-shaped carriage wearing sequined jerseys, "high-top heels," and "hair wrapped in nothing but net." Many basketball phrases are woven into the rhyming text, with sometimes clunky results: "'Girls cannot play,' the guard would say,/Asserting his offensive …. Lulu did not quibble./She offered up a hanky for the captain's double dribble." The empowerment theme has appeal, but it is restricted by the extensive wordplay.—Linda Ludke, London Public Library, Ontario, Canada
Kirkus Reviews

Girl power on the b-ball court.

Lulu is what you might call a girly-girl. You know—complete with tea sets, stuffed animals, makeup and unicorn pictures on her bedroom wall. But there's something else about Lulu: Her absolute most favorite thing to do is shoot hoops. Unfortunately, in Lulu's world, basketball is for boys, and they will not allow Lulu to play on their team. Whenever she asked, " 'Girls cannot play, the guard would say, / Asserting his offensive. / 'We'd knock you down, and doctor's bills / Are dreadfully expensive.' " Undaunted, Lulu decides to create her own team, sending out invitations to girls far and wide for an event she terms the "Basket Ball." Girls bound in from around the globe and astound Lulu with their basketball skills. The girls decide to form a league and appoint Lulu captain of one of the teams. The lively illustrations, done in ink, watercolor and gouache on watercolor paper, showcase an ethnically diverse group of strong, active girls who, sporting purses, dresses and jewelry, are clearly still girly-girls too.

Any girl who has ever been rejected from a boys' game will identify with this story, but with the growing popularity and availability of girls' sports, one hopes she won't have to go to the lengths Lulu did to find a league of her own. (glossary) (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781419700071
Publisher:
Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/2011
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.80(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
5 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Esmé Raji Codell is a bestselling author, literacy advocate, and librarian and the founder of the popular children’s lit website PlanetEsme.com. She lives in Chicago. Jennifer Plecas is the illustrator of Grandmas Are for Giving Tickles. She lives in Kansas City, Missouri.

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