Bataan Death March: World War II Prisoners in the Pacific

Bataan Death March: World War II Prisoners in the Pacific

by Robert Greenberger
     
 

In April 1942, during World War II, tens of thousands of American and Filipino prisoners of the Japanese were forced to march miles and miles on their way to a prison camp in the Philippines. They experienced almost unimaginably horrible conditions: tropical heat, disease, torture, near-starvation, dehydration, and the sight of their fellow prisoners being… See more details below

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Overview

In April 1942, during World War II, tens of thousands of American and Filipino prisoners of the Japanese were forced to march miles and miles on their way to a prison camp in the Philippines. They experienced almost unimaginably horrible conditions: tropical heat, disease, torture, near-starvation, dehydration, and the sight of their fellow prisoners being brutally killed. Only about 50,000 men of the original 70,000 survived the Bataan Death March, one of the most shocking events of the war.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Kris Sauer
Students of history would do well to pick up this middle-grade nonfiction account of the treatment of American and Filipino prisoner of war soldiers on the Philippine Islands during World War II. Focusing on the Bataan Death March, this account tells the horrific tale of over 70,000 Allied troops who were forced by their Japanese captors to march sixty miles in searing heat with little to no water, food, or medical care. While the story of the prisoners of war is the focus, interspersed chapters provide historical context on the battles waging beyond Bataan in the Pacific Theater. Sparing no detail, but restraining from gruesome overkill, the text gives readers a picture of the terrible conditions of the camps, the brutal treatment by the guards, and the medical experiments that later came to light during the war crimes trials conducted by the Military Tribunal for the Far East in Tokyo. Beyond being well-written, the book includes snapshots and vignettes from surviving prisoners personalizing this already searing account. Part of the "Snapshots in History" series, the text is written at a sixth to eighth grade reading level but has an interest level far beyond that. An extensive timeline is included, along with source notes, a glossary, bibliography, index, and lists of both print and Internet resources for further reading. Reviewer: Kris Sauer

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780756540951
Publisher:
Capstone Press
Publication date:
01/01/2009
Series:
Snapshots in History Series
Pages:
24
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.60(d)
Lexile:
1100L (what's this?)
Age Range:
11 - 15 Years

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