Batman Illustrated by Neal Adams, Volume 1

Batman Illustrated by Neal Adams, Volume 1

5.0 1
by Neal Adams
     
 
The first of a planned three volume set chronologically compiling the legendary Batman work of Neal Adams. The first volume contains Adams's complete run from 1967-69: Batman #200, #203 and #210; The Brave and The Bold #75-76 and #79-85; Detective Comics #370, #372, #385, #389, #391, and #392; and World's Finest Comics #174-176, #178-180, #182-183, #185, and #186.

Overview

The first of a planned three volume set chronologically compiling the legendary Batman work of Neal Adams. The first volume contains Adams's complete run from 1967-69: Batman #200, #203 and #210; The Brave and The Bold #75-76 and #79-85; Detective Comics #370, #372, #385, #389, #391, and #392; and World's Finest Comics #174-176, #178-180, #182-183, #185, and #186. Included is a new cover, an introduction by Adams, and an update and re-coloring of some of his early art.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781401200411
Publisher:
DC Comics
Publication date:
09/24/2003
Series:
Batman Series
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
6.78(w) x 10.49(h) x 0.93(d)

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Batman Illustrated by Neal Adams, Volume 1 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Outside of perhaps only Jack Kirby, there is no doubt that Neal Adams is the most influential comic book artist in the history of the genre. Even now, some thirty plus years after I began reading comic books I can still recall the issue numbers of so many of those classic Neal Adams issues...The battle against the Sentinels in X-men numbers 57 through 59, the Kree-Skrull war and that great cover from Avengers #96, Green Lantern #76, the first issue of his memorable run, etc... While Neal never stayed too long on any one title, he left an unforgettable imprint on every book he worked on, whether it was the socially conscious stories on Green Lantern, or his one issue fill-in on Conan #37. Which brings us to the character the Adams is perhaps most associated with, Batman. In the first of a three volume set, DC Comics is re-printing in chronological order, all of the Batman stories and covers that Adams did. The stories not only will include the Batman and Detective Comics stories, but also stories from World's Finest and The Brave and The Bold. In fact the first story in this volume comes from Worlds Finest # 175 from 1968. In a story called 'The Batman Superman Revenge Squad' two groups of villains plan to take out the pair of heroes as they are engaged in their annual battle of wits. While the story may seem somewhat corny in this day and age Adams always had the ability to bring a story up a few notches by just his style alone and make it seem more serious. This is especially true in a story from Brave & the Bold # 79 as Batman meets Deadman for the first time as Boston Brand is searching for the man who murdered him, and Batman is on the trail of the brother of the man who killed his parents. This is about as grim as it could get in 1968. In another Brave & the Bold story, Batman teams with the Flash against a two-bit hood named Bork who suddenly has gained tremendous strength and total invulnerability. While Batman tries to hold him in check, the Flash races around the world to try and find the source of his new found powers. In other stories in this volume, Batman teams with The Creeper, Sgt. Rock, The Teen Titans, and Green Arrow in a series of stories that helped take Batman back to his detective roots. One can certainly make the argument the gritty, dark atmosphere of Adams' art helped bring Batman out of the doldrums of the early and mid-1960's. Adams was one of the first artists to truly take a cinematic approach to comic art, using his panels as a camera lens and approaching the action at odd angles and perspectives never seen before in comics. His oddly angled geometric panels with the action bursting outside the borders became an Adams trademark. Reviewed by Tim Janson