Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again
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Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again

3.7 35
by Frank Miller, Lynn Varley
     
 

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It's been three years since the events of The Dark Knight Returns, and everything is just fine.  At least on the surface.  What the world at large doesn't know is that it's a total sham.  A perfectly choreographed, pretty little world where everything that's ugly, or even potentially disturbing, is all nicely wrapped up with neat little ribbons and

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Overview

It's been three years since the events of The Dark Knight Returns, and everything is just fine.  At least on the surface.  What the world at large doesn't know is that it's a total sham.  A perfectly choreographed, pretty little world where everything that's ugly, or even potentially disturbing, is all nicely wrapped up with neat little ribbons and swept under the carpet.  Only he knows better.  He's watched it fester to near-breaking point, and it's time for the only free man left who can effect any real change to bring it all down around their ears once and for all.

The Dark Knight returns once again with a vitality unseen since the first years of his war on crime.  Together with his army of Bat-soldiers, including Carrie Kelley—formerly Robin, and now the new Catgirl—the Dark Knight wages a new war on a diseased world that's become completely lost.

The Dark Knight Strikes Again features appearances by such DC icons as Superman, Wonder Woman, Green Arrow, Martian Manhunter, the Atom, the Question and more.  But are they still the World's Greatest Heroes or part of the conspiracy?

This incredible volume, designed by multiple award-winner Chipp Kidd, features a new introduction by Miller commenting on returning to the world he created fifteen years ago.  The book includes the complete 3-part story, plus numerous sketches and other never-before-seen material.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Miller has pulled off a triumphant return to Gotham—sure footed, chilling, prescient, witty and sometimes laugh out loud funny."—USA Today

“This revision of an iconic character, the sequel to Miler’s The Dark Knight Returns, has been one of the comics publishing’s most anticipated events.”—Publishers Weekly

bn.com
Graphic novel aficionados know the 1986 Batman: The Dark Knight Returns as a superhero classic, probably the greatest comic ever. Set three years after the events of The Dark Knight Returns, The Dark Knight Strikes Again reactivates Batman and his Bat-soldiers to wage war in a diseased and embattled world.
James Kochalka
As his peers grow older, Frank Miller just gets younger. DK2 is drawn with the energy and confidence of a teenager who knows in his heart that he's BETTER than Frank Miller, and he's ready to take the world by storm. This book is a startling, befuddling accomplishment. I love it.
USA Today
Miller has pulled off a triumphant return to Gotham — sure footed, chilling, prescient, witty and sometimes laugh out loud funny
Entertainment Weekly
His brutal yet elegant noir rendering, pulpy yet eloquent scripting, and thoughly uncompromising attitude make him one of the most distinctive voices in comics
Publishers Weekly
This revision of an iconic character, the sequel to Miller's The Dark Knight Returns, has been one of comics publishing's most anticipated events. As installments of the DK2 comic appeared, controversy mounted. Much sloppier and gaudier, the strip didn't really resemble Miller's earlier book, and in the wake of September 11, Miller's in-your-face confrontation with authority figures upset some readers. The collected book edition makes it easier to appreciate why he'd take such risks. Miller sees Batman as an extremist, pushed to the verge of insanity because he can't compromise his beliefs. In this continuation, he's convinced today's world is controlled by powers even crazier and more ego driven than he is. And he's right. Lex Luthor and Brainiac have imprisoned, enlisted or intimidated Earth's superheroes; but the only one they can't control is the hero with no super powers, just furious moral rage. Superman, the ultimate voice of reason, tries to calm Batman. Instead, all hell breaks loose, in pages full of bursting shapes, digitized Day-Glo colors and jagged continuity. Intense as the reading experience is, it's less disturbing than Batman's assault on the masters of America and their accomplices. Miller peppers the book with caricatures of current politicians and pundits rubbing shoulders with outrageously cartoonish goons as they defend a computer-generated president and the Freedom From Information Act. If the masters of power are engaging in terrorism, this work suggests, why shouldn't rebels use terror in return? But how does a successful rebel avoid becoming a fascist leader himself? These are the questions Miller asks in this serious, important comic, a work that's intentionally disturbing in many ways and on many levels. (July) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781563899294
Publisher:
DC Comics
Publication date:
12/17/2003
Series:
Batman Series
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
23,786
Product dimensions:
6.60(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
15 - 18 Years

What People are saying about this

Patrick Leahy
I'm glad my fellow Vermonter (Miller) is finally out of the batcave. Now, when the heck is he going to get to the third issue? Sen. Patrick Leahy

Meet the Author

Frank Miller began his career in comics in the late 1970s and rose to fame while first drawing, and then writing, Daredevil for Marvel Comics. He was also the creative force behind Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Batman: Year One, and Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again.  His many works have not only redefined classic characters, but also, on a few occasions, revitalized the comics industry. His creator-owned Sin City hit the page in 1991, and then the silver screen in 2005 — with Miller on board as co-director. His multi-award-winning 300 graphic novel was brought to full-blooded life in the 2007 motion picture of the same name, and in 2008 he directed the feature film of Will Eisner’s The Spirit.

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Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 35 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just finished this book and can't understand the negative reviews it has gotten. I thought it was great. I read the trade edition, which may have had more cohesion than the individual books, and I didn't bring any preconceived expectations when I started it. I know a lot of people anxiously awaited this and were disappointed when it finally arrived. I'll admit, it's not The Dark Knight Returns but then that work redefined Batman and changed the genre forever. This is just a terrific story, which for me is good enough.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bro, It's a Frank Miller Batman comic almost nothing could get better then this. I grew up reading this Batman and it's what made me the comic book junky I am today. This is a must read (After Reading The Dark Knight Returns) for any comic book fan or Batman fan. That is all!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A----
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is not nearly as good as the first one. The art work and story line altogether.
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RoCoST8 More than 1 year ago
Let me start off by saying that I'm a Frank Miller fan. I have all of the "Sin City" books, "300" is fantastic, I dig his "Wolverine," "Batman: Year One" is brilliant, and "Batman: The Dark Knight Returns" is a masterpiece. Having said that, I am NOT a fan of "Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again" at ALL. If you wished "Batman: The Dark Knight Returns" was actually "Batman and the Outsiders: The Dark Knight Returns," or you were constantly wondering what the Justice League was up to during TDKR, then you'll be very satisfied with TDKSA. It may be a Batman book, but the story focuses more on 3-4 other characters than it does on Batman. Jimmy Olsen has more of a presence in this story than Batman does! Also, why does Frank Miller HATE Robin? If you were in love with the gritty, layered, unique epic of TDKR, then do yourself a favor and don't tarnish that memory by mucking it up with TDKSA. If, like me, you're a bit of a completionist and you just HAVE TO have this book, then you can have mine.
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I picked up this book soon after reading The Dark Knight Returns and was left severly dissapointed. The plot was pretty good, but I cant tell what's going on with the disgusting art. Plus the stupid news reports from those punk kids talking about the superchix was really annoying. But what was interesting is the Dick Grayson thing because in All Star Batman & Robin The Boy Wonder he is verbally abused constantly by Batman so it was nice to the effects it had on him. I'm sorry Frank, this I wont forgive you for.
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