Batman: Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader? (NOOK Comics with Zoom View)

Batman: Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader? (NOOK Comics with Zoom View)

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by Neil Gaiman, Andy Kubert, Various
     
 

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Best-selling author Neil Gaiman (The Sandman) joins a murderer's row of talented artists in lending his unique touch to the Batman mythos for this Deluxe Edition hardcover! Spotlighting the story "Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?" from Batman #685 and Detective Comics #852, Gaiman joins artist Andy Kubert and inker Scott Williams for a story that shines a new…  See more details below

Overview

Best-selling author Neil Gaiman (The Sandman) joins a murderer's row of talented artists in lending his unique touch to the Batman mythos for this Deluxe Edition hardcover! Spotlighting the story "Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?" from Batman #685 and Detective Comics #852, Gaiman joins artist Andy Kubert and inker Scott Williams for a story that shines a new light on the Batman mythos. Batman: Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader? also collects Gaiman stories from Secret Origins #36, Secret Origins Special #1, and Batman Black And White #2. This collection is not to be missed!

Editorial Reviews

George Gene Gustines
Its title story, written by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Andy Kubert, imagines several variations of Batman's death. This anthology, published by DC Comics, also includes other stories by Mr. Gaiman about the millionaire Bruce Wayne's famous alter ego. The other tales are very good, but "Whatever Happened to ..." packs enough emotional punch to stand solo.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly
Following the “death” of Bruce Wayne in last year's “Batman: R.I.P.” arc comes Gaiman's loving eulogy not just to Batman but to the Batman of each era since the character's debut. Bolstered by slick art from Kubert (Batman; Captain America), Gaiman's lyrical chops are in fine form, weaving a surreal wake in which characters from Batman's history take turns relating what he meant to them, and their takes on the Dark Knight and the dangerous microcosm he fought for and eventually purportedly “died” to protect. Although this is obviously a love letter from one of the comics medium's premiere talents, the volume will appeal more to readers well-versed in Batman's continuity than Gaiman's normal legion of fans As the finished story only amounts to two issues of material, this hardcover is padded out with lesser—though not badly written by any means—stories teaming Gaiman with Simon Bisley, Mark Buckingham, Kevin Nowlan and Bernie Mireault, plus a sketchbook by Kubert. (July)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781401243609
Publisher:
DC Comics
Publication date:
02/19/2013
Sold by:
DC Comics
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
128
Sales rank:
252,003
File size:
65 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Neil Gaiman is the New York Times best-selling author of the Newbery Medal-winning The Graveyard Book and Coraline, the basis for the hit movie. His other books include Anansi Boys, Neverwhere, American Gods and Stardust (winner of the American Library Association's Alex Award as one of 2000's top novels for young adults) and the short story collections M Is for Magic and Smoke and Mirrors. He is also the author of The Wolves in the Walls and The Day I Traded My Dad for Two Goldfish, both written for children. Among his many awards are the Eisner, the Hugo, the Nebula, the World Fantasy and the Bram Stoker. Originally from England, he now lives in the United States.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Date of Birth:
November 10, 1960
Place of Birth:
Portchester, England
Education:
Attended Ardingly College Junior School, 1970-74, and Whitgift School, 1974-77
Website:
http://www.neilgaiman.com

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Batman: Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader? 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Mike-P More than 1 year ago
I found part two of this two-part comic arc on a Christmas trip to Canada. Upon my return to Indiana, I had my local comic shop find the first part before I read the story. I immersed myself in the wonders of the Batman mythos; swimming the eddies and currents that Neil Gaiman left in the wake of his writing. I won't attempt details or synopsis...I can't make the words sing or the punctuation keep time. This is a story that makes all Batmen one. Bob Kane to Frank Miller, Adam West to Christian Bale-they all belong, they all make sense. I bought this hardcover because the story deserves a permanent place in my library. The extras chapters are excellent as well. The deciding factor was the personal, touching dedication that Neil penned to his recently deceased father. Perfect.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm not particularly a huge batman fan but I grew up watching the cartoon etc... I am, however, a big fan of adult comics, especially those with more complicated plots and themes. This one was put together spectacularly from start to finish and really bent my mind as to what a basic super hero comic could do. The art is equally compelling but not just for its immediately aesthetic appeal.... I have read "The Killing Joke" Alan Moore, "Joker" by Brian Azzarello and this. I would place them in this order, which may seem like blasphemy to some 1) Caped Crusader 2) Killing Joke 3) Joker
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Incognegro More than 1 year ago
The two issues (Batman and Detective Comics) that were the focus of the collection were pretty boring and the plot and artwork somewhat ludicrous. Thankfully the other 3 or 4 stories included were very good; much better than the lead material. If you want an "end of superhero x" story, the "Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?" by Alan Moore is far superior.