Bats at the Ballgame

Bats at the Ballgame

3.3 6
by Brian Lies, Chris Sorensen
     
 

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Hurry up!  Come one—come all!  
We’re off to watch the bats play ball!

You’ll never forget your first game: the green so green, the presence of heroes past, and togetherness with family and friends, rooting for the home team.

But you think humans are the only ones who enjoy America’s national pastime? Grab your

Overview

Hurry up!  Come one—come all!  
We’re off to watch the bats play ball!

You’ll never forget your first game: the green so green, the presence of heroes past, and togetherness with family and friends, rooting for the home team.

But you think humans are the only ones who enjoy America’s national pastime? Grab your bat—the other kind—and your mitt, and join these captivating bats as they flutter off to watch their all-stars compete. How about a mothdog?  Or some Cricket Jack?

In sweeping compositions that transport fans to the rightside-up and upside-down world of bats at play, Brian Lies treats us to a whole new ballgame.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Baseball stadiums have an innate magic, never more so than in the hands of Lies, whose latest has the winged creatures gathering for an epic game, complete with "beenuts and Cricket Jack," and an upside down audience. Smooth, unhurried rhymes illuminate a hidden world where bats, like humans, "feel a magic shift,/ and ride the currents of the game/ as time is set adrift." Each gleaming page is thick with detail, from the bats' first arrival ("We wing from dark to dazzling bright,/ startled by the stunning sight") to the final play. Fans of the other baseball bats will certainly enjoy these ones. Ages 3-7. (Sept.)
From the Publisher

"Baseball stadiums have an innate magic, never more so than in the hands of Lies, whose latest has the winged creatures gathering for an epic game, complete with 'beenuts and Cricket Jack,' and an upside down audience" —Publishers Weekly, starred review

"The visual effect is quite stunning, with some fantastically disorienting upside-down spreads to reflect the fans' hanging position, and much of the language is utterly delicious."—Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"Careful readers will find plenty of inventive details to make this latest outing to the bats’ nocturnal world worthwhile." —School Library Journal

Praise for Brian Lies’ New York Times best-selling books:

Bats at the Beach

"Brilliant, brilliant paintings . . . just a whiz-bang summer book, anytime book. Everybody should look at this." —Daniel Pinkwater, NPR’s Weekend Edition Saturday

"Perfect for sharing with younglings of the wingless sort." —Kirkus Reviews

"The book truly soars in the dark yet luminescent art. . . . A grand adventure." —School Library Journal

"Fetching . . . [A] wonderful read-aloud." —Newsday

Bats at the Library

"The library-after-dark setting works a magic all its own, taking Lies and his audience to an intensely personal place." —Publishers Weekly, starred review

"[Lies] brings a sure, expressive and transporting hand to this story of a colony of bats paying a nighttime visit to a small-town library." —Kirkus Reviews

"Illustrations teem with bats so charming they will even win over chiroptophobes." —Booklist

"Another tale of bat mischief . . . the charm is all in the story itself." —New York Times Book Review

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
The intriguing bats of Bats at the Beach and Bats at the Library take us along, in deftly rhymed couplets, to "watch the bats play ball." When dark arrives they are startled by the bright colors as they watch the preparation of the ball field, then stand for the anthem. The other team has beaten theirs in the past. In this game, both sides are scoreless until the seventh inning, when their opponents get a run. Catching a foul ball is a more cheerful highlight for our bat friends. Old timers reminisce as they hope for a change in the score. Mothdogs and Cricket Jack are consumed. Suddenly the crack of a baseball bat begins a drive. Excitement soars as the winning run scores. But then they must leave: "...we speed to beat the rising sun." The acrylic dark night scenes create a melodramatic environment for the anatomically correct and appropriately uniformed bats engaging in the game. Vignettes illustrate historical moments; other perspectives focus on the audience. There is good-natured fun in these imaginatively conceived images that hold attention as we wonder where the bats will take us next. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
Gr 3—As in Bats at the Beach (2006) and Bats at the Library (2008, both Houghton Harcourt), Lies's luminous acrylic illustrations are the highlight here. The bats are earnest and cuddly, with translucent eyes and twitchy noses. Here, they're engaged in a topsy-turvy baseball game of dizzying perspectives. The game is played on the ground, though the participants swoop, glide, and soar around the bases and the spectators hang upside down above them in the stands. The illustrations, with brilliant colors and eye-catching details, carry the story when the verses fall flat. Fans will enjoy the bats' version of the game: flying vendors offer mothdogs and Cricket Jack, as the grounds crew marks the baselines with powdered sugar and rakes the pitcher's mound with a fork. Careful readers will find plenty of inventive details to make this latest outing to the bats' nocturnal world worthwhile.—Marilyn Taniguchi, Beverly Hills Public Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews
Previously Lies has given his bats nights at the library and the beach with great success. Now they play night baseball on a ballfield laid out under a circus tent with crowds of bat fans and vendors selling appropriate snacks like "mothdogs." The game proceeds with swoops and slides and a win for the home team. The action is described in verse with the rhymes in easy, breezy aabb form for setup and denouement and heightened "Casey at the Bat" cadences and couplets for the game itself. Lies's acrylic illustrations appear as full- and double-page spreads and scattered, unframed vignettes, and all are filled with copious detail depicting uniforms, regalia and play-by-play. The visual effect is quite stunning, with some fantastically disorienting upside-down spreads to reflect the fans' hanging position, and much of the language is utterly delicious. A broad knowledge of baseball and its place in the American consciousness is assumed, as is an ability to roll with rather sophisticated vocabulary and phrasing. But as a read-aloud by a baseball fan, it's sure to inspire a love of the game—and maybe of bats as well. (Picture book. 5-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781449826253
Publisher:
Recorded Books, LLC
Publication date:
10/07/2010

Meet the Author

BRIAN LIES is the award-winning author-illustrator of the New York Times bestsellers Bats at the Beach, Bats at the LibraryBats at the Ballgame, and Bats in the Band. In addition, he has written and illustrated more than twenty books for children. Born in Princeton, New Jersey, Brian lives on the South Shore of Massachusetts with his family. Visit www.BrianLies.com to learn more about the author and his books.


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Bats at the Ballgame 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
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Very cute book
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