Bats

Bats

4.0 1
by Gail Gibbons
     
 

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Their amazing abilities and how they fit into the natural world.

Overview

Their amazing abilities and how they fit into the natural world.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Kindergarten-Grade 3-A clever format and succinctly written text distinguish this offering by a prolific author. Gibbons describes bats' general physical characteristics, special traits of some half-dozen species, flying methods, use of echolocation, diet, natural habitats, hibernation, and the birth and development of young. She also discusses the decimation of bats around the world due to loss of habitats and pollution and the efforts to protect the world's only truly flying mammals. A final page offers additional miscellaneous facts. The text is clearly written and well organized. Scientific terms such as "nocturnal," "membrane," and "roosts" are clearly defined in context. Double borders enclose vivid paintings of bats in their natural habitats. While Ann Earle's Zipping, Zapping, Zooming Bats (HarperCollins, 1995) and Betsy Maestro's Bats: Night Fliers (Scholastic, 1994) cover similar ground, Gibbons's title makes an appealing addition to natural history sections.

Taking issue with the unkind and untrue things said about bats through the years, Gibbons presents children with a more favorable introduction to the species. The text clearly describes the many types of bats as well as their physical characteristics, habits, and life cycle. Deep-toned illustrations dominate the pages, showing bats in action against midnight-blue or moonlit skies. The occasional splashes of color light up brilliantly against the dark backgrounds. Well suited for classroom use, this book makes a good case for bats as an admirable part of the natural world.

School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-A clever format and succinctly written text distinguish this offering by a prolific author. Gibbons describes bats' general physical characteristics, special traits of some half-dozen species, flying methods, use of echolocation, diet, natural habitats, hibernation, and the birth and development of young. She also discusses the decimation of bats around the world due to loss of habitats and pollution and the efforts to protect the world's only truly flying mammals. A final page offers additional miscellaneous facts. The text is clearly written and well organized. Scientific terms such as "nocturnal," "membrane," and "roosts" are clearly defined in context. Double borders enclose vivid paintings of bats in their natural habitats. While Ann Earle's Zipping, Zapping, Zooming Bats (HarperCollins, 1995) and Betsy Maestro's Bats: Night Fliers (Scholastic, 1994) cover similar ground, Gibbons's title makes an appealing addition to natural history sections.-Karey Wehner, San Francisco Public Library Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Therese Durhman
From spooky vampires to amazing echolocation, this book contains both common misconceptions and fascinating facts about the mysterious bat. Large, colorful illustrations and simple diagrams support this fascinating nonfiction selection.
Bookbag Magazine

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780823416370
Publisher:
Holiday House, Inc.
Publication date:
01/28/1999
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
142,362
Product dimensions:
9.78(w) x 9.70(h) x 0.13(d)
Lexile:
AD750L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Gail Gibbons has published close to fifty distinguished nonfiction titles with Holiday House. According to "The Washington Post", "Gail Gibbons has taught more preschoolers and early readers about the world than any other children's writer-illustrator." She lives in Vermont. Her website is www.gailgibbons.com

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Bats 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago