Battle Hymn of the Tiger Daughter

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Daughter

3.4 5
by Diana Holquist
     
 

How one family fought the myth that you have to destroy childhood to raise successful adults.

What does a “successful” child look like?
If you imagined a straight-A-earning, classical-music-playing, rule-following, Ivy-bound prodigy, you’re not alone.

This is what I thought my kid should look like, too. I was determined to raise my

Overview

How one family fought the myth that you have to destroy childhood to raise successful adults.

What does a “successful” child look like?
If you imagined a straight-A-earning, classical-music-playing, rule-following, Ivy-bound prodigy, you’re not alone.

This is what I thought my kid should look like, too. I was determined to raise my child in this image, no matter the cost. After all, I was one of those kids. The traditional path to success sure worked for me.

I was a tiger mother.

But then life intervened in ways I couldn’t have imagined. I was faced with two choices: Impose my will no matter the trauma. Or, take a frightening, uncharted path—

—to where?

A sub-standard child, unable to succeed on the level I had?

Did letting up mean letting my child down?

Answering these questions took my family on a fascinating journey. What looked and felt like failure after failure on adult terms led to a different kind of success: mad creativity, fierce independence, and relentless self-direction.

In other words, everything an adult needs to make it in today’s world.

So what does a successful child look like?

She looks like my child. Maybe, she also looks like yours.

(Diana Holquist is the author of the parenting memoir Battle Hymn of the Tiger Daughter, the children's book parody The Rabbit Who Wants to Go to Harvard, as well as several romance novels, including those published as Sophie Gunn. A graduate of Columbia University and former advertising copywriter, she lives near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania with her husband, two teenagers, and three cats.)

PRAISE FOR NOVELS BY DIANA HOLQUIST:

"With characters so real, they jump off the page..." --Doubleday Book Club

“(Holquist)...raises some serious issues, leaving readers’ eyes shining both with happiness and tears.” --Library Journal

"...laughter, passion and deeply moving sentiment." --New York Times Bestseller Robyn Carr

"...humor, warmth, emotions, characters that step off the page..." --New York Times Bestseller Mariah Stewart

"...a real treat for readers..." --New York Times Bestseller Susan Wiggs

"...Holquist is one for the keeper shelf." --Parksberg News and Sentinel

“A delightful debut...” --Booklist, starred review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940032947547
Publisher:
Diana Holquist
Publication date:
12/11/2011
Sold by:
Smashwords
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
11 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

I love to write. That’s pretty much all I do. Ask my family about the undone laundry, the un-bought groceries, and the fact that I rarely find time to get dressed in the morning. Actually, if you train your family right, they won’t notice any of these things. "Popcorn for dinner again, mom! Cool," say my filthy children. It took me a long time to figure out WHAT to write. So I spent years writing ads, brochures, and company reports. If I had to give advice to anyone--which, thankfully, I don’t--it would be that if you want to write books, start now. In fact, get the heck off this website and do it. (First, throw your TV out the window. Good. Now write.) Are you still here? Okay, then you must be a pure reader (or my mother). Good for you. No money in writing. Best to have a real job. What else do you want to know about me? I love kids. I love cats. I love chocolate. (Not necessarily in that order.) I live just outside of Philadelphia with kids and cats and my dear husband. I also write small town romances under the name Sophie Gunn.

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Battle Hymn of the Tiger Daughter 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
CPL More than 1 year ago
Contrary to what the one-star reviewer believes, Diana Holquist IS a successful novelist (you can search for her on B&N—she also publishes under the name Sophie Gunn—and no, I am not Diana Holquist, or even her mother, but I have read and enjoyed several of her books). "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Daughter," however, is not a novel but a charming portrayal of a mother/daughter relationship that does not depend on bashing anyone's culture: it merely encourages U.S. parents to look at their strengths as well as their weaknesses. If you disagree with the advice, you may still enjoy the story of Diana's emotional journey and her daughter's distinctive voice. Personally, I think this book is on to something: an intense focus on externals (e.g., admission to an Ivy League school) can not only blind a parent to the importance of internal growth and values but place a great deal of stress on the kids who must live up to such high expectations. Long-term, the kids' relationships with those parents also suffer. I'm glad to see this fresh angle on a debate that often seems sadly misguided. Well worth $3.99!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Do NOT let the 2 poor reviews prevent you from reading this gem. I suspect they were posted by Tiger Mothers. I have 2 happy, well-adjusted, straight A teenagers who were minimally scheduled and maximumly encouraged to pursue their own joys. Both found sports they love and excel at, but have free time to roam on our property and help around the house. The author is espousing an idea that is the not a new one-most of us in our 40's grew up this way, and most of us are happy, successful adults. It's 3.99-give it a try. You will learn something.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Horible book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This author starts off her argument by simply spitting back the opening of Battle Hymn of a Tiger Mother. She criticizes the parenting styles of said book, but doesn't convince this reader that she actually read the whole book, especially the turning point & conclusion. I assume she simply wants to justify her way of parenting when she feels that she has been attacked through someone elses' writing. This reader also can't take her writing too seriously since in the opening pages she touts herself as a "successful novelist", yet this book has been published through Smashwords, a self publishing group. Sorry, but this reader will not go beyond the free sample on Nook.