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Battle: The Nature and Consequences of Civil War Combat
     

Battle: The Nature and Consequences of Civil War Combat

2.0 1
by Kent Gramm (Editor), Alan T. Nolan (Contribution by), Paul Fussell (Contribution by), Bruce A. Evans (Contribution by), Eric T Dean (Contribution by)
 

Romanticism is as rife in Civil War history as any other and may produce more than its share of drums and trumpets writing that glosses over the fear, pain, and death that are inevitable components of all warfare. The essays that make up this collection seek to act as corrective to such celebratory history by carefully examining some of the unpleasant realities

Overview

Romanticism is as rife in Civil War history as any other and may produce more than its share of drums and trumpets writing that glosses over the fear, pain, and death that are inevitable components of all warfare. The essays that make up this collection seek to act as corrective to such celebratory history by carefully examining some of the unpleasant realities that marked combat in the Civil War—when industrial and technological warfare came of age, at a time when medical care, sanitation, diet, and other modern adaptations to industry were still in their infancy.
In addition to an introduction, an afterword, and an essay on the “Numbers” by editor Gramm, Paul Fussell contributes a powerful essay on “The Culture of War”; D. Scott Hartwig examines the face of battle at Gettysburg; Bruce A. Evans discusses “Wounds, Death, and Medical Care in the Civil War” ; Eric T. Dean rethinks the meaning and consequences of combat in “The Awful Shock and Rage of Battle” ; and Alan T. Nolan looks at the national consequences of battle and the resultant myth of the Lost Cause.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Congratulations to Gramm and his contributors on their good work. Battle has greater cohesion than most collections of its kind. It will appeal to both specialists and general readers.”
—Perry D. Jamieson, coauthor of Attack and Die: Civil War Military Tactics and the Southern Heritage

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780817316228
Publisher:
University of Alabama Press
Publication date:
05/28/2008
Edition description:
1
Pages:
184
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author

Kent Gramm is Professor of English at Wheaton College, Illinois, and author of November: Lincoln’s Elegy at Gettysburg and Somebody’s Darling: Essays on the Civil War.

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Battle: The Nature and Consequences of Civil War Combat 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Ajhall More than 1 year ago
While not a bad collection of essays on Civil War combat, this slim volume offers few new arguments, or compelling insights. The contributors know their subject, and they write well (Paul Fussell's entry is particularly entertaining, as one would expect from such a curmudgeonly author), but the cover price is steep for such small rewards. Lindeman's "Embattled Courage", or Small's "Road to Richmond", for example, offer far more compelling views of Civil War combat experience. This volume is appropriate for the true Civil War enthusiast or scholar with an already well-established library, not the casual reader.