Bayou Salado

Bayou Salado

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by Virginia M. Simmons

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Pruet, Fred
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5.55(w) x 8.53(h) x 0.74(d)

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Bayou Salado 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
QuickDraw More than 1 year ago
Bayou Salado focuses on the region of Colorado that is now known as South Park. The name comes from an American twist of French and Spanish terms meaning "salt valley". This is an area very rich in history, having historical significance dating back before the United States was even a country, and far before Colorado was a state. The book is filled with interesting historical facts, as well as some folklore reminiscent of the "wild west". Some common themes kept showing up throughout the book, usually displayed by the various settlers to the area. Self-dependence is a big one, due in part to the "every man for himself" attitude of the Colorado Rockies. There is a feeling of loneliness and solitude, particularly when little mines high atop a mountain far away from civilization, as well as many old bustling towns turned to a beaten down ghost town are described. I particularly enjoyed this book for a number of reasons. One of them being that I have a personal connection to the area described in the book. A piece of property belonging to my family even appears in the book, and it is a place that I have visited frequently since I was very young. It was very exciting to read about the rich history of the ground I have walked on for all of these years. The pictures and maps provided within the pages are excellent to use as a reference while reading. One thing that I did not enjoy so much was some occasional skipping around that the author did. At some points it became confusing, because McConnell would move chronologically from 1860 all the way to the 1930s, and then move back to 1860 at another moment, without much warning. For those trying to arrange somewhat of a mental time line of events, this poses problems, unless you reread more carefully. For those interested in Colorado history, this is a great read. Colorado natives will also love it. Names like Colfax, Tabor, Pike, and many others that you have heard around Denver all have history in South Park. In addition, people that like tales of the wild west, will find some good reading between some possibly monotonous descriptions of locations and dates. If you have no interest in those things, it will be a painful read, as the writing style is not incredibly exciting.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a wonderful historical reference to South Park Colorado. It contains not only history but some fun local lore.