BBQ USA: 425 Fiery Recipes from All Across America [NOOK Book]

Overview

Have Tongs, Will Travel
Guided by the simple conviction that if something tastes good baked, fried, sautéed, or steamed, a pit boss somewhere in this land has figured out how to make it even better over a live fire, Steven Raichlen logs tens of thousands of miles to take you on a tour of America's barbecuing

Finger Lickin' or highfalutin', smoked, rubbed, mopped, or ...
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BBQ USA: 425 Fiery Recipes from All Across America

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Overview

Have Tongs, Will Travel
Guided by the simple conviction that if something tastes good baked, fried, sautéed, or steamed, a pit boss somewhere in this land has figured out how to make it even better over a live fire, Steven Raichlen logs tens of thousands of miles to take you on a tour of America's barbecuing

Finger Lickin' or highfalutin', smoked, rubbed, mopped, or slathered, the 425 recipes in BBQ USA are where fire meets obsession, and the results are smoky perfection.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Raichlen's 24th tome falls firmly into the quirky camp of his Beer Can Chicken, with its mixed-grill of recipes, barbecue tips, food history and restaurant profiles. While the chapters are essentially broken down by main ingredient ("Going Whole Hog," "Sizzling Shellfish"), each entry is branded with the city from which it is borrowed: "The Pittsburgh airport was the last place I expected to find superlative roast beef" begins a typical entry. At times, the attention to geography (and photos of bbq joints) is used to fine effect, especially in the appetizer chapter, where chicken-wing variations from Indianapolis, Louisville, Nashville and Buffalo are laid out for easy comparison. But at other times the locale is superfluous. New York City is no more the place for Tarragon Chicken Paillards than landlocked Dayton is for Fennel-Grilled Shrimp. Classic BBQ joints, such as Wilber's in Goldsboro, N.C., are profiled along the way, and succinct, interesting history lessons on various styles of barbecue (Memphis, Kansas City, etc.) are served up. Cooking tips are provided in the margins of nearly every other page, with more space given to larger projects, such as how to barbecue a whole hog. The 650 photos are of various chefs, eateries, markets and fresh produce, rather than what is coming off the grill. (Apr.) Forecast: Workman plans a $100,000 marketing campaign, along with a 25-city author tour-and if that's not enough to push sales, in May, PBS will launch the 13-part series Barbecue University with Steve Raichlen. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
KLIATT
This comprehensive book takes the reader on a delightful tour of our culture and food history while providing some of the best and most comprehensive information that is currently available about "Que." Loads of tips provide much-needed information for successful grilling. Recipes, photos, anecdotes and restaurant profiles are included for all aspects of dining from breads and pizzas through main courses to desserts. All the recipes are easy to prepare and offer marvelously delightful results for both the beginning and experienced cook. Imagine feasting on: Jalapeno Jerk Baby Back Ribs, Jake's Barbecued Veal Brisket, Baltimore Pit Beef, Grilled Salmon with Salsa Verde, Grill-Blackened Red Fish, Pinto Bean Quesadillas with Jalapeno Cheese, Grilled Asparagus with Portobellos, Thelma's Dirty Rice, Smoke Roasted Apple Crisp, or Cinnamon Grilled Peaches. Mail order sources are also included. This is required reading for anyone who wants to cook outdoors. KLIATT Codes: JSA;Recommended for junior and senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 2003, Workman, 774p. illus. bibliog. index.,
— Shirley Reis
Library Journal
Raichlen is the author of two dozen cookbooks on a variety of subjects, but his best-selling The Barbecue! Bible and its successors have made him the "Grill King." Fans, then, will be delighted with his latest book-not to mention the related PBS series, Barbecue University, debuting this summer. Although champion "pitmasters" may have a more narrow definition of the term barbecue, here Raichlen includes recipes for all sorts of grilled or smoked foods, from traditional regional specialties such as North Carolina's Classic Pulled Pork to that backyard favorite, the Ultimate Hamburger, to upscale dishes like Herb-Grilled Sea Bass with Garlic Mint Vinaigrette. Each recipe is identified by place of origin, and there are reviews and histories of famed barbecue joints and other notable spots, dozens of sidebars offering helpful hints, and more than 600 black-and-white photographs. Strongly recommended. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761159582
  • Publisher: Workman Publishing Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 4/22/2003
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 784
  • Sales rank: 99,232
  • File size: 33 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Steven Raichlen
Steven Raichlen is America’s “master griller” (Esquire). His books have won James Beard and IACP awards and his last, Planet Barbecue!, was a New York Times bestseller. Articles by him appear regularly in The New York Times, Food & Wine, and Bon Appe´tit, and for the past dozen years he teaches the sold-out Barbecue University, first at the Greenbrier and currently at the Broadmoor in Colorado Springs. He and his wife live in Miami and on Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts.
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Read an Excerpt

Pacific Northwest Planked Salmon With Mustard and Dill Sauce (page 456)

Method: Grilling on a plank

For the salmon:
1 salmon fillet, with or without skin (about 11/2 pounds; ideally cut from the end closest to the head; see Note)
About 1 tablespoon olive oil
Coarse salt (kosher or sea) and freshly ground black pepper

For the glaze:
1/2 cup mayonnaise (preferably Hellmann's)
1/3 cup Meaux (grainy French) mustard
2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
Coarse salt (kosher or sea) and freshly ground black pepper

You'll Also Need:
1 cedar plank (about 6 by 12 inches), soaked for 2 hours in water to cover (a rimmed baking sheet or large roasting pan works well for soaking),then drained

Run your fingers over the salmon fillet, feeling for bones. Using needle-nose pliers or tweezers, pull out any you find. Rinse the salmon under cold running water, then blot it dry with paper towels. If using salmon with skin, generously brush the skin with olive oil. If using skinless salmon, brush one side of the fish with olive oil. Season both sides with salt and pepper. Place the salmon on the plank, skin side down, if it has one; oiled side down if not.

Make the glaze: Place the mayonnaise, mustard, dill, and lemon zest in a nonreactive mixing bowl and whisk to mix. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Set up the grill for indirect grilling and preheat to medium-high.

When ready to cook, spread the glaze mixture evenly over the top and sides of the salmon. Place the salmon on its plank in the center of the hot grate, away from the heat, and cover the grill. Cook the salmon until cooked through and the glaze is a deep golden brown, 20 to 30 minutes. To test for doneness, insert an instant-read meat thermometer through the side of the salmon: The internal temperature should be about 135ªF. Another test is to insert a slender metal skewer in the side of the fillet for 20 seconds: It should come out very hot to the touch.

Transfer the plank and fish to a heatproof platter and slice the fish crosswise into serving portions. Serve the salmon right off the plank.

Yield: Serves 4

Note: You can use fish fillets with or without skin-your choice. My wife finds that the skin makes the salmon taste fishy. I love it.) For that matter, the recipe works well with other rich oily fish fillets, including bluefish and pompano.

St. Louis, Mo. Super Smokers Sweet and Smoky Dry Rub Ribs (page 289)

Method: Indirect grilling Advance preparation: 4 hours for curing the ribs

Ingredients:
4 racks baby back pork ribs (6 to 8 pounds total)
2 cups firmly packed brown sugar
1 cup coarse salt (kosher or sea)
1/4 cup freshly ground black pepper
Dr. Pepper barbecue sauce, for serving

You'll also need:
2 cups wood chips or chunks (preferably apple), soaked for 1 hour in water to cover, then drained; rib rack

Remove the thin, papery membrane from the back of each rack of ribs: Turn a rack meat side down. Insert a sharp implement, such as the tip of a meat thermometer, under the membrane (the best place to start is right next to the first rib bone). Using a dishcloth or pliers to gain a secure grip, pull off the membrane. Repeat with the remaining racks.

Place the ribs on baking sheets.

Place the brown sugar, salt, and pepper in a bowl and stir to mix well. (Actually your fingers work better for mixing a rub than a spoon or whisk does.) Sprinkle this rub all over the ribs on both sides, patting it onto the meat with your fingertips. Cover the ribs with plastic wrap and let cure in the refrigerator for 4 hours.

Set up the grill for indirect grilling (see page 23 for gas or page 22 for charcoal) and preheat to medium.

If using a gas grill, place all of the wood chips or chunks in the smoker box or smoker pouch and run the grill on high until you see smoke, then reduce the heat to medium. If using a charcoal grill, place a large drip pan in the center, preheat the grill to medium, then toss all of the wood chips or chunks on the coals.

When ready to cook, using a rubber spatula, scrape the excess rub off the ribs. Place the ribs, preferably on a rib rack, in the center of the hot grate, over the drip pan and away from the heat. Cover the grill and cook the ribs until tender, 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 hours.

When the ribs are done, they'll be handsomely browned and the meat will have shrunk back about 1/4 inch from the ends of the bones. Transfer the cooked ribs to a platter or cutting board. Serve them as whole racks, cut the racks into pieces, or carve them into individual ribs. Serve them with the St. Louis-style barbecue sauce.

Yield: Serves 4 really hungry people or 8 folks with average appetites

Dr Pepper Barbecue Sauce (page 376)

Ingredients:
1 large juicy lemon
1 clove garlic, peeled and lightly crushed with the side of a cleaver
1 thin (1/4-inch) slice onion
1 cup Dr Pepper
3/4 cup ketchup
3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons A.1. steak sauce
1 tablespoon of your favorite hot sauce, or more to taste
1 tablespoon cider vinegar,or more to taste
1 teaspoon liquid smoke
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Coarse salt (kosher or sea)

Cut the lemon in half cross wise and cut a 1/4-inch slice off of one half. Remove any seeds in this slice. Juice the remaining lemon: You should have 2 to 3 tablespoons juice.

Place the lemon slice, 2 table spoons of the lemon juice, and the garlic, onion slice, Dr Pepper, ketchup, Worcestershire sauce, steak sauce, hot sauce, vinegar, liquid smoke, and pepper in a heavy nonreactive saucepan and gradually bring to a boil over medium heat.

Reduce the heat slightly to maintain a gentle simmer. Let the sauce simmer gently until thick and richly flavored, 10 to 15 minutes. Taste for seasoning, adding more lemon juice, hot sauce, and/or vinegar as necessary and seasoning with salt to taste, if desired.

Strain the sauce into a bowl (or clean glass jars) and let cool to room temperature, then refrigerate, covered, until serving. The sauce will keep for several months in the refrigerator.

Bring to room temperature before serving. Yield: Makes about 2 cups

Buffalo, N.Y. Buffa-que Wings (page 73)

Method: Indirect grilling

Advance preparation: 4 to 12 hours for marinating the wings

For the wings and marinade:
16 whole chicken wings (about 31/2 pounds)
1/2 cup Tabasco sauce or your favorite hot sauce
1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup vegetable oil
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons coarse salt (kosher or sea)
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

For the mop sauce:
8 tablespoons (1 stick) salted butter
1/2 cup Tabasco sauce or your favorite hot sauce

For serving:
Blue Cheese Sauce or dressing
4 ribs celery, rinsed and cut into thirds lengthwise, then cut crosswise into roughly 3-inch sticks

You'll also need: 1 1/2 cups wood chips or chunks (preferably hickory or oak), soaked for 1 hour in water to cover, then drained

Rinse the chicken wings under cold running water and blot them dry with paper towels. Cut the tips off the wings and discard them (or leave the tips on if you don't mind munching a morsel that's mostly skin and bones). Cut each wing into 2 pieces through the joint.

Make the marinade: Whisk together the hot sauce, lemon juice, oil, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, salt, and pepper in a large nonreactive mixing bowl. Stir in the wing pieces and let marinate in the refrigerator, covered, for 4 to 6 hours or as long as overnight, turning the wings several times so that they marinate evenly.

Make the mop sauce: Just before setting up the grill, melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat and stir in the hot sauce.

Set up the grill for indirect grilling and preheat to medium. If using a gas grill, place all of the wood chips or chunks in the smoker box or in a smoker pouch and run the grill on high until you see smoke, then reduce the heat to medium. If using a charcoal grill, place a large drip pan in the center, preheat the grill to medium, then toss all of the wood chips or chunks on the coals.

When ready to cook, drain the marinade off the wings and discard the marinade. Brush and oil the grill grate. Place the wings in the center of the hot grate, over the drip pan and away from the heat, and cover the grill. Cook the wings until the skin is crisp and golden brown and the meat is cooked through, 30 to 40 minutes.

During the last 10 minutes, start basting the wings with some of the mop sauce.

Transfer the grilled wings to a shallow bowl or platter and pour the remaining mop sauce over them. Serve with the blue cheese sauce and celery for dipping and of course plenty of paper napkins and cold beer.

Yield: Makes 32 pieces

NOTE: ALL RECIPES FROM BBQ USA by STEVEN RAICHLEN. EACH RECIPE REPRINTED OR POSTED ONLINE MUST CONTAIN THE FOLLOWING CREDIT-- Recipe from BBQ USA by Steven Raichlen Copyright ¼ 2003 by Steven Raichlen All rights reserved. Used by permission of Workman Publishing.

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Table of Contents

Introduction: What is Barbecue?(1)

A Brief History of Barbecue in America(5)

Getting Started: A Concise Primer on Grilling & Barbecuing (17)
A short course in choosing a grill, setting it up, getting it lit, and knowing when the food is cooked.

Off to a Fiery Start (32)
Begin the meal with pizzazz. Flame cook Prosciutto-Wrapped Peaches like they do in Virginia, chicken wings the Louisville way, Mojo-Marinated Pork Florida style, and Tiki Beef Kebabs with California flare. Dozens of choices, plus some drinks to serve alongside, including a Chimayo Cocktail.

Live-Fire Salads (108)
Grilling brings out the best in a salad. Wait until you try the Grilled Caesar Salad or the Tomato and Hearts of Palm. Plus Calamari Salad with White Beans and Bitter Lettuce, and four kinds of slaw.

Breads and Pizzas (132)
The grill makes the perfect toaster. There's plenty of room for that Little Italy favorite, garlic bread. Or A New Corn Stick from the West Indies. Or pizzas the way they grill them in Rhode Island and New York. Bread takes to fire like smoke to the grill.

Gloriously Grilled Beef (162)
North America's love affair with beef is celebrated in a luscious round-up of steaks from Tucson, San Antonio, New York, Miami, Dallas, Toronto, L.A., Indianapolis, and of course, Philadelphia (sizzling with cheese). Plus briskets from North Dakota, Oklahoma, and Ohio, and everything else big and beefy.

Going Whole Hog (232)
The icon of American barbecue, pork, couldn't be more succulent than it is here—pulled and piled high on buns like they do in North Carolina, coffee-crusted and served Kentucky-style with Redeye Barbecue Sauce, roasted whole for a pig pickin à l
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 13, 2010

    Not for the Everyday BBQ

    I bought this book for my husband who is looking to improving his barbque. Many of the recipies contain a long list of ingredients. What my husband did appreciate is the information on grilling & the variety of heat applicable to the different grades of meat.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2012

    Excellent!!!

    Very happy with this cookbook....everything I was looking for on bbq :)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 3, 2011

    Dont bother buying through them

    I bought a book and did not recieve what I had ordered. I was told to keep the book and they would send me the book that I had ordered. I was pleased with that. Then I received the book. I ordered a book in good condtion the book I received was junk. Several pages ruined and food was stuck on the pages and cover. Gross! I emailed and the company did not even respond or appoligize. They said that I would get a refund. Shipping was exremely slow so I had to wait and it was just a waste of my time. I would not order from this company.

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted September 3, 2009

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    Posted June 19, 2009

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    Posted June 20, 2010

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