Beacon Street Mourning (Fremont Jones Series #6)

Beacon Street Mourning (Fremont Jones Series #6)

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by Dianne Day
     
 

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Five years ago Caroline Fremont Jones fled the proper world of her native Boston for the independent life of a California private detective. But now, in the winter of 1909, she is grief-stricken to learn of her father’s grave illness.

Still hampered by half-healed injuries from her last adventure — but buoyed by her ever-deepening affection for her

Overview

Five years ago Caroline Fremont Jones fled the proper world of her native Boston for the independent life of a California private detective. But now, in the winter of 1909, she is grief-stricken to learn of her father’s grave illness.

Still hampered by half-healed injuries from her last adventure — but buoyed by her ever-deepening affection for her partner in love and work, Michael Kossoff — Fremont leaves sunny San Francisco for the ice-edged air and handsome mansions of Beacon Street.

Her visit has scarcely begun when her father, suffering from a malady not even his doctor can diagnose, takes a turn for the better ... only to die suddenly in the middle of the night. Fremont is certain her odious stepmother, Augusta, somehow caused her father’s death. But how? And did she have an accomplice?

Michael questions Fremont’s suspicions ... until an exotic piece of evidence and a second, violent death trigger an investigation that draws upon childhood memories and fears to become Fremont’s most personal one yet.


From the Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

Chicago Tribune
What is immensely appealing is the care Day takes to recreate the period and differentiate two very different cities on bays 3,000 miles apart. The expert crime-solving, it turns out, is something of a bonus.
New York Times Book Review
With her independent spirit and youthful determination, Miss Jones is virtually invincible.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Plenty of period flavor and a heroine who's a nascent feminist with an independent streak as wide as San Francisco Bay distinguish this sixth turn-of-last-century adventure from Macavity Award winner Day (The Strange Files of Fremont Jones). Though still recovering from devastating injuries incurred during a previous outing, feisty Fremont Jones leaves San Francisco to return home to Boston to attend her ill, perhaps dying father, Leonard. Fremont makes the arduous trip cross country accompanied by her lover, Michael Kossoff, co-owner and partner in the J&K (detective) Agency. Fremont has to cope not only with Leonard's illness but also with her stepmother, Augusta, whom she suspects may have been poisoning him, as well as with a greatly changed Boston (or is it she who has changed?). As Fremont faces the inevitable parting from her father, she also begins to deal from a new, adult perspective with the people she knew as a child. Just as she and Michael are on the verge of sorting out some tricky questions of poison and murder, the shooting death of Augusta forces them to reassess their assumptions. Day's astute descriptions of the social mores and day-to-day life in Boston in 1909 are as entertaining as the characters she creates, and give much added pleasure to the reader. (Sept.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Turn-of-the-century San Francisco's feisty detective, Fremont Jones, hastens to her dying father's bedside in Boston. After he dies, Fremont is convinced that her disliked stepmother poisoned him--until someone kills her. Fremont and partner/lover Michael Archer subsequently expose any number of suspects. A wonderful, atmospheric historical mystery. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
Internet Book Watch
Over four years ago, Fremont Jones, a prominent young woman in Boston high society, left her home to escape the social pressure fostered on her by the upper crust. She journeyed to San Francisco where she opened up a typing business. On the West Coast, Fremont met the love of her life, Michael Kossoff, a former(?) spy for both the American and Russian governments. They survived the first great twentieth century earthquake in the area and now manage a detective business, the J and K Agency. While recovering from some recent injuries, Fremont worries about not hearing from her East Coast father. She learns that he is probably dying. Fremont wonders if her detested stepmother Augusta is involved with her dad's failing health. She arranges for her father to go to the hospital and accompanied by Michael, heads east to visit him. While in Boston, Fremont sees her dad rallying. He leaves the hospital only to die from a sudden heart attack. Fremont and Michael investigate Augusta s activities as they expect foul play occurred until someone kills the wicked stepmother. Dianne Day is one of the better historical mysteries on the market today. Fremont is a great character struggling with gender discrimination in the first decade of the twentieth century. Her independence stamps her as unacceptably strange. Beacon Street Mourning is a thought-provoking tale that is an insightful social commentary as well as an in depth character study. Adding to the fun of this novel is that for the the first time in the series, the audience glimpses what drove Fremont to go west young lady. Fans will understand her demons and motives even as new readers search for previous tales in a fabulous series.
—Internet Book Watch
From the Publisher
“With her independent spirit and youthful determination, Miss Jones is virtually invincible.”
The New York Times Book Review

“Plunging into the rich atmosphere of upper-crust Boston in the winter of 1909, Day’s tale mesmerizes with long-festering secrets.”
Booklist

“What is immensely appealing is the care Day takes to recreate the period and differentiate two very different cities on bays 3,000 miles apart. The expert crime-solving, it turns out, is something of a bonus.”
Chicago Tribune

Don’t miss Fremont’s bestselling adventures:

The Strange Files of Fremont Jones
Macavity Award Winner for Best First Mystery Novel
“One of the most refreshing heroines to appear in years ... Day rates top marks for her crisp, witty dialogue ... cleverly conceived plot, and darkly menacing touches.”
Booklist

Fire and Fog
“This delightful mystery begins with a bang ... and things get more and more complicated from there.”
San Francisco Chronicle

The Bohemian Murders
“A special treat. Highly recommended.”
Chicago Tribune

Emperor Norton’s Ghost
“A lively and atmospheric mixture of sharply observed detail and high drama.”
— Amazon.com

Death Train to Boston
“An extremely appealing book ... great fun to read.”
The Book Report

And coming soon in hardcover from Doubleday:
Cut to the Heart

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307417909
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
12/18/2007
Series:
Fremont Jones Series , #6
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
304
File size:
2 MB

Read an Excerpt

San Francisco * January 1909

WITH THE TURN of the New Year came, as always, a time of resolutions and new beginnings. No more could I afford the vaguely pleasurable limbo in which I'd lately been floating. So I took stock and began to deal with feelings of guilt I had metaphorically swept under the carpet.

Since my return to San Francisco in early December from a certain trip I didn't even like to think about, I'd allowed myself to luxuriate in feelings of safety and belonging. I was daily overwhelmed with gratitude at simply finding myself alive--especially considering a number of things that had happened while I was away that might have produced quite the opposite result. There were times when to be alive and in love with my partner Michael Kossoff was almost more happiness than I could bear. Of course there were also times when I wished I were strong enough to throw him off the roof of our house at the top of Divisadero Street, but that's another story.

If I were honest, I had to admit that underneath my happiness ran a subterranean vein of the most profound disquiet, and in this vein lay the source of my guilt: deep concerns about my father. I was worried about his health and general well-being, certain I had good reason for worry, and yet I had done next to nothing.

Oh, I had a good excuse for my inaction: two broken legs that were excruciatingly slow to heal, and some unpleasant mental and emotional aftereffects of that aforementioned trip. I would have denied having any problem other than my legs if anyone had asked, especially Michael; lacking control over one's thoughts and feelings can be most distressing. My legs were stronger now--I had recently traded my crutches for two canes--and even though I was less sure about strength in the rest of me, I could not wait any longer to do something about Father.

Ever testing limits, I tucked one cane under my left arm and, leaning only upon the other one, started across the sitting room. Three steps: drops of perspiration broke out on my forehead. This was agony--not so much physical, although there was pain. The embarrassing truth was, ever since giving up the crutches, I'd been afraid of falling.

Breathing hard against fear's chill, I thought: Why push myself too far? I needed both the canes, for balance as well as support. Even so, I forced one more step before allowing the relief that flooded me as soon as I put that second cane to the floor.

If I hadn't known better, I could've sworn this house had grown larger during the time I was away. It took a ridiculously long time to cross this room. Or any room. Finally I reached the other side, as sweat-drenched as if I'd run a race in midsummer rather than walked a few steps indoors on a gloomy, rainy San Francisco winter day.

Taking a seat at a little antique writing desk that had been a welcome-home gift from Michael, I heard the telephone ring right beneath my feet. Downstairs on my side of our double house is the office suite of J&K, the private investigation agency that Michael and I own and operate together. Not that I had lately been of any use to our operation whatsoever. I sighed, and reached for writing paper.

The telephone rang three times before it was picked up, then faintly I heard the inimitable tones of Edna Stephenson's voice. She has a large voice for such a small woman, yet I couldn't make out her exact words. Never mind, she always said the same thing anyway: "The J and K Agency. This is Mrs. Stephenson, the receptionist, speaking. May I help you?"

I smiled, then frowned, straining to hear even though I knew the chance of my being able to make out the words through the thick walls of the house was slim to none. Lately my pleasure at being safe and sound has been regularly outweighed by a strong desire to resume all my normal activities, such as snooping. As an eavesdropper I excelled, in large part due to my unusually acute hearing. But here the walls defeated me; in the world at large my physical limitations did the same. What good is a detective who cannot walk unaided? For whom a flight of stairs presents a formidable obstacle? How long, oh how long before I would be myself again?

My present routine had me going downstairs to the office twice a day, once in the morning and once in the afternoon, to meet with the others and hear what cases the agency had going. These two trips up and down were all I could physically handle.

Sitting in on case discussion was not enough for me. I wanted to do more. I might have stayed downstairs to do typewriting in the mornings, I was physically capable of that--but Edna had become quite a good typewriter. She could run the office alone. She did not need me, and after a few minutes I inevitably felt like an intruder. The office was no longer my territory, I had made myself into a detective, or an investigator, and if I could not detect or investigate then I felt useless.

Downstairs the sound of Edna's voice ceased; involuntarily I winced as she banged the earpiece back on its hook, a gentle hang-up not being Edna's style. For a moment I pictured her slipping out of her chair--she is a short woman whose feet do not quite reach the floor when she sits at her desk--then tottering on tiny feet across the front office, through the conference room, and then into the kitchen. I glanced at my pendant watch--another gift from Michael, who has been showering me with entirely too many presents lately--to confirm the time. As I'd thought, it was about 4 p.m. In another hour I would make my way down the stairs to follow the same path Edna had just taken in my mind's eye, back to the kitchen where she and Michael and Wish and I would discuss what they had done today. Wish Stephenson is our other investigator, and Edna is his mother. The others would talk and I would listen; greedily, enviously I would drink in their words along with Edna's scalding coffee.


From the Hardcover edition.

Meet the Author

Dianne Day spent her early years in the Mississippi Delta before moving to the San Francisco Bay Area. She now lives in Pacific Grove, California, where she is at work on a novel of suspense based on the life of Clara Barton. Fremont Jones has appeared in five previous mysteries: The Strange Files of Fremont Jones, which won the Macavity Award for Best First Novel, Fire and Fog, The Bohemian Murders, Emperor Norton’s Ghost, and most recently, Death Train to Boston.


From the Paperback edition.

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Beacon Street Mourning 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Over four years ago, Fremont Jones, a prominent young woman in Boston high society, left her home to escape the social pressure fostered on her by the upper crust. She journeyed to San Francisco where she opened up a typing business. On the West Coast, Fremont met the love of her life, Michael Kossoff, a former spy for both the American and Russian governments. They survived the first great twentieth century earthquake in the area and now manage a detective business, the J and K Agency.

While recovering from some recent injuries, Fremont worries about not hearing from her East Coast father. She learns that he is probably dying. Fremont wonders if her detested stepmother Augusta is involved with her dad¿s failing health. She arranges for her father to go to the hospital and accompanied by Michaels heads east to visit him. While in Boston, Fremont sees her dad rallying. He leaves the hospital only to die from a sudden heart attack. Fremont and Michael investigate Augusta `s activities as they expect foul play occurred until someone kills the wicked stepmother.

Dianne Day is one of the better historical mysteries on the market today. Fremont is a great character struggling with gender discrimination in the first decade of the twentieth century. Her independence stamps her as unacceptably strange. BEACON STREET MOURNING is a thought-provoking tale that is an insightful social commentary as well as an in depth character study. Adding to the fun of this novel is the first time in the series the audience glimpses what drove Fremont to go west young lady. Fans will understand her demons and motives even as new readers search for previous tales in a fabulous series.

Harriet Klausner

Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago

This is a clever spoof of Caleb Carr type 'historical' mysteries. Fremont Jones, a cross between Betty Boop and a Valley Girl finds herself magically in 1909 San Francisco in the guise of a professional detective. She receives a message from Boston stating that her father is desperately ill and that, by all indications, her evil step-mother, Augusta, is slowly poisoning him to death. She rushes to Boston where she meets the family doctor who has little interest in treating our heroine's father nor ordering an autopsy after he dies. After fretting for three-hundred pages over whether the other characters will call her Caroline or Fremont, Detective Jones solves the mystery. The evil step-mother did indeed poison the lovable, but fatally male father, and the unpleasant doctor did assist her.

Two of the characters are charmingly drawn. First, there is the self-chatting Fremont Jones who manages to be a successful detective in spite of her inability to think clearly. The ebullient, wandering mind of a fifteen-year-old trapped in the body of an adult professional is most intertainingly described. Ms Day's success at maintaining this subtle irony in balance throughout is what really carries the work

To compliment Fremont Jones' character, we have Michael Kossoff, a handsome Russian nobleman in his forties, a much in demand international spy who  would seem well suited to head up a well-respected detective agency.  As worldly and sophistocated as he is, however, Kossoff continually finds himself the docile Dr. Watson to the clever detective engenue. This irony is also played out to the fullest.

Ms. Day has a very subtle whit that certainly deserves recognition. Unfortunately, there are those who have done the author some disservice by insisting on taking this spoof as a serious historical mystery. The position is based primarily upon several instances where Ms. Day spoofs Caleb Carr by gratuitously reciting names of various period streets, buildings and restaurants. Publishers have supposedly reaped additional profits by taking this approach. More likely though, it is an attempt to shore up Caleb Carr's reputation as a credible historian.

On the plus side, sales of the book have increased as a result. Power to the Gullible! Ms. Day wins after all.

Guest More than 1 year ago
I¿m not going to bore you with another rendition of the plot of this book. I will say that a reader should start at the beginning of this series to get the full enjoyment of this story. Fremont Jones is a wonderfully fleshed out character. Ms. Day is a wonderful and entertaining writer. She does a great job of characterization and plotting in her books. The author is also great at giving her books a good feel for the times. Weather it be, social, physical or emotional. The reader gets the added plus of comparing East and West Coast in this installment. Ms. Day is right, there is a vast difference between the two. May be next time Fremont can go to Southern California, once again there is a vast difference. It would be interesting to see Fremont¿s take on that one. The mystery in this installment is a good solid one. Who did what or did it happen at all? Then the why, Ms. Day as always does an excellent job of closing the plot and explaining the why of this story. Once again, I wholeheartedly recommend this book and series.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Over four years ago, Fremont Jones, a prominent young woman in Boston high society, left her home to escape the social pressure fostered on her by the upper crust. She journeyed to San Francisco where she opened up a typing business. On the West Coast, Fremont met the love of her life, Michael Kossoff, a former(?) spy for both the American and Russian governments. They survived the first great twentieth century earthquake in the area and now manage a detective business, the J and K Agency.

While recovering from some recent injuries, Fremont worries about not hearing from her East Coast father. She learns that he is probably dying. Fremont wonders if her detested stepmother Augusta is involved with her dad¿s failing health. She arranges for her father to go to the hospital and accompanied by Michael, heads east to visit him. While in Boston, Fremont sees her dad rallying. He leaves the hospital only to die from a sudden heart attack. Fremont and Michael investigate Augusta `s activities as they expect foul play occurred until someone kills the wicked stepmother.

Dianne Day is one of the better historical mysteries on the market today. Fremont is a great character struggling with gender discrimination in the first decade of the twentieth century. Her independence stamps her as unacceptably strange. BEACON STREET MOURNING is a thought-provoking tale that is an insightful social commentary as well as an in depth character study. Adding to the fun of this novel is that for the the first time in the series, the audience glimpses what drove Fremont to go west young lady. Fans will understand her demons and motives even as new readers search for previous tales in a fabulous series.

Harriet Klausner