Bearwalker
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Bearwalker

3.8 45
by Joseph Bruchac, Sally Wern Comport
     
 

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Neither human nor animal, but something in between

Baron has always been fascinated by bears—their gentle strength and untamed power. But the Bearwalker legend, passed down by his Mohawk ancestors, tells of a different kind of creature—a terrible mix of human and animal that looks like a bear but is really a bloodthirsty monster.

The tale never

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Overview

Neither human nor animal, but something in between

Baron has always been fascinated by bears—their gentle strength and untamed power. But the Bearwalker legend, passed down by his Mohawk ancestors, tells of a different kind of creature—a terrible mix of human and animal that looks like a bear but is really a bloodthirsty monster.

The tale never seemed to be more than a scary story . . . until a class camping trip deep in the Adirondacks, when Baron comes face-to-face with an evil being that is all too real.

Editorial Reviews

KLIATT - Paula Rohrlick
According to Ojibway tradition, "bearwalkers" are part bear and part human, vicious monsters driven by blood lust. On a class trip to a wilderness camp in the Adirondacks, Baron, a Mohawk 8th-grader bullied by his classmates, meets one of the counselors and immediately suspects that the man is one of these terrible creatures. When an explosion blocks the only road out of the camp and the phone lines are cut, it appears that this counselor is part of a plot to close the camp down so that some greedy men can gain control of the land. Baron must somehow escape this bearwalker—and some real bears, too—in a mad race through the woods in order to rescue himself and his classmates and foil the plot. This exciting horror story, illustrated with b/w drawings, is based on Native American folklore, like Bruchac's The Dark Pond and Skeleton Man. It's got lots of tense and rather gruesome moments, and readers will cheer Baron on as he proves himself a hero.
Children's Literature - Denise W. McGrain
Baron was new in school and like any other kid, he hated being the new kid on the block. Being new was one thing, but being different was an added burden. His mom was in Baghdad, and his father had vanished two years ago in Afghanistan. He was now living with his grandmother whom he loved, but it was not the same as being with his mother. One day Mrs. Mars, the school librarian, handed him a book after seeing him in the library so often. When he saw the cover, he snatched the book so quickly out of her hand that he almost took her fingers with it. The Sacred Paw was just the thing he loved to read; ever since he was little he had loved stories, pictures, and anything about bears. He had always had a lifelong fascination with bears, plus he was a Native American from the Mohawk tribe, belonging to the Bear Clan. He remembered his mom telling him one time that his very first word had been bear. One day, Baron comes face to face with what, at first, looked like a bear and then a human. He soon realizes that the stories he had heard handed down from generation to generation were not a myth, but tales of a real live bloodthirsty monster! He would have to deal with on this monster in his own way on his own terms. This book is a great reading adventure for any young reader who is ready for the deep unknown and the adventure of a life time.
Kirkus Reviews
Thirteen-year-old Baron Braun has enough to deal with: new school, bullies, being short, a missing father and a mother in Iraq. He does not need a week at camp with his new classmates and those bullies. When he gets to Camp Chuckamuck, he finds that it's run by the creepy Mr. Mack. What's even more frightening is Walker White Bear who is decidedly un-Native American, despite his looks. Walker also reminds Baron of the Mohawk legends about a man who turns himself into a monster bear by killing his relatives. Without warning, the only road to camp is destroyed by scheming developers. Baron is the only hope of his classmates, and whether he's a Mohawk monster come to life or just a crazy human, Walker stands in Baron's way. Despite a plot that runs on slasher-film logic and an inconsistent use of the convention of the tale told in a journal, fans of Bruchac's short, Native American legend-inspired horror will enjoy this latest entry in the series. (Fiction. 9-12)
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“Bruchac spins a striking story, filled with interesting information about bears, chilling moments around the campfire, and life–or–death chase scenes. Readers will return again and again to this adventure tale.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
"Bruchac spins a striking story, filled with interesting information about bears, chilling moments around the campfire, and life–or–death chase scenes. Readers will return again and again to this adventure tale."
The Bulletin for the Center for Children's Books
“Bruchac spins a striking story, filled with interesting information about bears, chilling moments around the campfire, and life-or-death chase scenes. Readers will return again and again to this adventure tale.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“Bruchac spins a striking story, filled with interesting information about bears, chilling moments around the campfire, and life–or–death chase scenes. Readers will return again and again to this adventure tale.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061123092
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
07/03/2007
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
4.50(w) x 7.50(h) x 0.81(d)
Lexile:
860L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

Bearwalker

Chapter One

Pioneer Junior High

I hate the name of my school. Almost as much as I hate the fact that I am the shortest kid in eighth grade. There are even sixth graders taller than me.

But I am not small enough to be forgotten by at least one person as I slouch in my corner desk with my head down.

"Baron," Mr. Wilbur says from the door of the classroom. "Come on, buddy. Let's go. Everybody else is outside."

So much for my wonderful idea. I should have known it was too good to be true when the principal announced over the PA that any student who was not outside promptly at 9 a.m. and lined up for the bus would be left behind.

I shoulder my backpack and go out the front door of the school. I'm mad that my idea about getting out of this "special experience" hasn't worked. I don't notice that Mr. Wilbur has turned back to get something and is not behind me. Mistake number one. Mistake number two is walking out in the blinding sunlight without noticing what gang of three boys is hanging around the door. The three main reasons I am dreading the days ahead.

"Oops," says a familiar voice, just before a leg hits my shin at just the right place to send me sprawling onto my face. My hands scrape the pavement, but at least I don't hit my face and get a bloody nose like I did the first time this happened to me. One thing I've learned in the time I've been at Pioneer Junior High is how to fall.

I look up over my shoulder at the big round face of Asa Denham. His long blond hair is like a halo lit by the sun around his head, but his amused expression is not that of an attentive angel. His twobuddies—who hang around him like the other two-thirds of a set of Siamese triplets—look over each of his shoulders. Ernie Crimmins and Harle Clark look just as self-satisfied as their leader. I don't know which one of the three tripped me, but they're all enjoying the spectacle of me flattened on the sidewalk like roadkill.

"Sorry," Asa says.

"Yeah," Ernie agrees. "Sorry you're such a clumsy little shrimp."

"Shrimp," Harle repeats. His imagination is limited.

Not surprisingly, seeing as how downed prey always attracts the pack, other kids have quickly gathered round.

"Fight?" someone says in a hopeful voice. As if I were about to get up just to get even more convincingly flattened.

"Yo," a foghorn tone chips in, "what happened to Baron? He trip over an ant?" It's Willy Donner, of course. Willy is a weird match for that big voice of his. He's as skinny as I am short. But he is always so quick with his sarcasm that no one ever gets a chance to make a crack about him before he makes some biting remark of his own.

Someone pushes his way in front, takes my arm and lifts me up.

"Come on, Baron," he says. It takes me a moment to realize who it is. I'd been expecting a teacher to be the one to step in, but it's not. It's Cody Campbell. Cody is not just one of the biggest, he's also the best-looking guy in the eighth grade. Sort of a teenage Brad Pitt. The girls swoon over him. And because he's the best football player in school, the guys all respect him, too. Asa and his crew have already taken a few steps backward to disappear into the crowd.

I'm still trying to get over my shock about Cody actually noticing me, much less lending a helping hand to me, when I hear the AP's brusque voice.

"Move aside," he snaps, as if he actually had to say something for the crowd to part before him like the waters of the Red Sea. No one ever wants to get on the wrong side of Assistant Principal Stark. He stares down at me as if trying to identify some lower form of life that just crawled out from under a rock.

"What's going on here, Mr. Braun?" he says. "Did I hear someone say 'fight'? Has someone been picking on you?" His hooded eyes take in the scrapes on my hands before I can put them behind my back. ZTP, I think. ZTP.

ZTP. That stands for the zero tolerance policy in effect at our school when it comes to fights. Anyone involved, including the hapless victim, gets punished. All I have to do is mention Asa's name and we'll both be up the creek. In detention, probably denied the opportunity to go on the class trip. Hmm. I'm tempted. But what works against my temptation is the ancient junior high code of Omerta. Nobody squeals on nobody, no matter what.

"I tripped," I say. "Mr. Campbell here just helped me up."

"Humph," the AP snorts. He turns on his heel and strides back into the building.

Cody slaps me once on the chest, a friendly slap that confuses me. It's as if I've done something admirable.

"You never cry, do you?" Someone else has come up next to me. It must be the Indian boy's day for having white kids sneak up on him. It's a girl this time. Her name is Tara and her desk is next to mine. She hands me a tissue. "Your hand is bleeding," she says. Instead of saying anything, I just press the tissue against the scrape on my hand and walk away from both of them.

As the class lines up for the bus, I look back at the redbrick buildings of the school. Could it really be six months since my uncle Jules dropped me off here for the first time?

He had volunteered that first day to pick me up from the trailer park and take me to school because Grama. ..

Bearwalker. Copyright © by Joseph Bruchac. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

Meet the Author

Joseph Bruchac is the author of Skeleton Man, The Return of Skeleton Man, Bearwalker, The Dark Pond, and Whisper in the Dark, as well as numerous other critically acclaimed novels, poems, and stories, many drawing on his Abenaki heritage. Mr. Bruchac and his wife, Carol, live in upstate New York, in the same house where he was raised by his grandparents.

Sally Wern Comport has been making pictures professionally since the age of sixteen. Her images have been seen in the editorial, advertising, and publishing markets worldwide, and her work includes the picture book Brave Margaret: An Irish Adventure, by Robert D. San Souci. She lives in Annapolis, Maryland, with her studio partner — husband and their two daughters, Taylor and Olivia, and she recently completed her graduate education at Syracuse University to further her passion for the art of illustration.

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Bearwalker 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 43 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think bearwalker is a very good book it is so good it is a boy who didn't think any body liked him into they went on a.Feild Trip and then things started to get bad though because it was to guys that were very bad but if i were a publisher i would give the book 5 stars i really like this book alot is very very fantastic book.I did not want to finish the book because that was so good i wish it was a part two the book but the book .Is very good for everybody who does not like to read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
OMAR AND ZEBA
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought this was a well written book but kinda weird how Jason Jones wa sa canible
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Reading in class during breaks in tcaps so far so good
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Alekskotsyuba More than 1 year ago
The book Bear Walker was a good book in all.All though I expected a real bearwalker, you know an otgont not just some guy pretending to be a bear walker.Jason Jones was a goodcharicter.I like fiction so I would prefer if they put an actual person that can change into a bear. That would have made the book more interesting to me.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Bearwalker starts out with a charged beginning, but only goes downhill from here. The only exciting part after this is really the end. I also think that the climax is too short. It all just happens so fast. There seems to be nothing leading up to this. Sure, there was a small explosion of excitement here and there, but this book was really just boringness and more boringness. I did not like this book, so I give it only two out of five stars.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"BearWalker" is an excellent book. I would recamened this book to people. I love the part in the book where Baroun saved Mr.ozgoods life. By when Baroun throw rocks at Walker Whitebear and Walker Whitebear ran after him. he triped on rocks and Walker Whitebear fell on rock. Thats is what I thought of the book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The story of the Bearwalker was thrilling, mysterious and adventorous. The ending is where everything goes wrong, who goes from being in the forest laying on the ground with no details to all of the sudden laying in a hospital bed. I hate that! Overall I thuink the beginning and the middle of the book was amazing. It was like a roller coaster ride of mysteries and adventours. It would have been a great 5 out of 5 stars, but the ending blew it all!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book because it was full of mischief, adventure, and it was a mystry. This book gave me the chills because it was so great. Also this book was great because in the beginning, a boy named Baron had no friends, and at the end, Baron was a hero to many people because he is so brave. I think that many kids in grade 6-12 should read this book. This was one outstanding book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was not here for basiclly most of the book, while the rest of the class was reading it. But, from what i have heard of this book from other people in my school, i guess it would be a better book that i imagine. I was here for when the class finished the book. I think if you like endings where its a "cliff hanger", you wouldnt really like this ending of this book. I enjoy cliff hanger books because it leaves you thinking, "what will happen next?" This book did not have anything close to being a cliff hanger, or something similar to a cliff hangar. But, i guess if i actually read the book, everything would have made more sense, obviously.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I would like to start out by saying, that i really enjoyed reading this book and i would love to read it again. I would recomend this book for someone, who enjoys a good mystery with some thrill intwined into it. Also maybe for someone who enjoys reading about bears. I also like the charecters in the book. But, you have to pay close attention when you read this book otherwise, it can be rather confussing. But one thing i dont like about this book is that it has a boring begining. But towards the middle to the end it becomes much more exciting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Joseph Bruchac wrote a book its called Bearwalker its not that good because it the begging theirs not a big thrill orgood stuff in it.At the end theres a big thrill and a good feeling at the end.But its still a good book if you like that kind of book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought that Bearwalker was a good novel. In my opinion, the beginning was a little slow moving. I also thought that there wasn't much action until the middle of the book. I thought that the beginning wasn't that good but the ending was good. The story was thrilling and exciting at the end. There were lessons learned and many cliffhangers that made me want to read more. Overall I thought that Bearwalker was a good novel and I give it four stars.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
BearWalker started out slow and nothen was realy going on. As i got into the book it got realy interesting. Weard things started to happen no one knew why.People started to disapear no one knew where they where people got worried.I thought this book is very good. This book is very good if you like storys that are mystery.I gave this book a three because of the beging it started out slow.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Joseph Bruchac's Bearwalker has a good storyline. strong characters and I really like its vocabulary. That said, there are also a few things I didn't like about it. Bearwalker is one of those books that has an extremely slow beginning. To be perfectly honest, I almost suffered through the beginning. After that the book started to pick up its pace. It became exciting and had cliffhangers at every turn. I would recommend this book to readers who like Native American stories or animal stories. But brace yourself for a very slow beginning.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book, by Joseph Bruchac, which is Bearwalker, was a pretty good book. I wasn't very interseted in it when I first started reading. I don't really read this kind of Genre, because I'm into more scary, and dramatic books, but for the first time I read this book, I was actually pleasently surprised. It wasn't as bad as I thought it was going to be. I guess I should've memorized the phrase, "don't judge a book by its cover.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book ''Bearwalker'' by Joseph Bruchau was exciting. It starts off slow but ends in an exciting way. It has just enough mystery to keep you wanting to read more. Joseph Bruchau writes the chapters with the most exciting parts at the end just so you will want to read on. I would recommed this book to anyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago