The Beastly Bride: Tales of the Animal People

The Beastly Bride: Tales of the Animal People

4.3 15
by Ellen Datlow
     
 

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What do werewolves, vampires, and the Little Mermaid have in common? They are all shapechangers. In The Beastly Bride, acclaimed editors Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling bring together original stories and poems from a stellar lineup of authors including Peter S. Beagle, Ellen Kushner, Jane Yolen, Lucius Shepard, and Tanith Lee, as well as many new, diverse

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Overview

What do werewolves, vampires, and the Little Mermaid have in common? They are all shapechangers. In The Beastly Bride, acclaimed editors Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling bring together original stories and poems from a stellar lineup of authors including Peter S. Beagle, Ellen Kushner, Jane Yolen, Lucius Shepard, and Tanith Lee, as well as many new, diverse voices. Terri Windling provides a scholarly, yet accessible introduction, and Charles Vess's decorations open each story. From Finland to India, the Pacific Northwest to the Hamptons, shapechangers are part of our magical landscape-and The Beastly Bride is sure to be one of the most acclaimed anthologies of the year.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Lisa Martincik
Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling have gathered another impressive batch of stories for their latest anthology, this time focusing on shape changers and those who wed them. The 21-page introduction examines the history of shape changer tales and breaks them down into three categories. This tri-fold definition allows for a surprisingly wide array of shifters and stories, though some authors do cheat on the "beastly bride" part. For example, an old, otherworldly doctor in Gregory Frost's "The Comeuppance of Creegus Maxin" merely paves the way to young love between two humans by taking an abusive father for the last ride of his life. Young Sabine in "The Abominable Child's Tale" by Carol Emshwiller is the curious offspring of a human mother and a beautiful bigfoot. Jeannine Hall Gailey grants a more hopeful interpretation of a sad French poem in "The White Doe: Three Poems." Peter Beagle's powerful and lovely "The Children of the Shark God" evokes traditional beast/bride elements when a woman marries a god and produces two feisty offspring. These 22 authors, ranging from award-winning to relatively new, draw from pure imagination as well as from the oldest of folklore. The shifter's inherent elements of otherness and change prove ideal for examining the tribulations of young adulthood, love, alienation, and acceptance. Though many traditional stories feature cruelty or tragedy, this collection gentles some, though by no means all, of the familiar darker outcomes in favor of viewing events through a fresher and more optimistic prism. One result is that, coincidentally, every story includes a female character of merit and gumption. The majority of these beastly tales make for fun, thoughtful, occasionally gripping, reading. Reviewer: Lisa Martincik
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up—In Datlow and Windling's latest short-story anthology on mythic themes, celebrated contemporary authors explore shape-shifters in fantasy. The stories run the gamut from humorous to tragic and have roots in old tales from many different parts of the world. In Hiromi Goto's "The Hikikomori," outcast Masako finds inner strength when she is transformed into a rat. In Midori Snyder's "The Monkey Bride," Salim's integrity is tested and found worthy by his shape-shifting wife, while in Tanith Lee's "The Puma's Daughter," Matthew Seaton's wild bride tests his credulity and loyalty. Not all are love stories—in Peter S. Beagle's "The Children of the Shark God," siblings Keawe and Kokinja risk perilous journeys to confront their absentee father. These tales and many others explore all manner of shape-changers, from werewolves to mermaids. Despite differing styles, the stories flow smoothly from one to the next. Windling's fascinating introduction details the history of shape-shifters in legends from around the globe. This collection will appeal to fantasy lovers as it provides both stories by beloved authors and exciting new voices to discover.—Misti Tidman, Boyd County Public Library, Ashland, KY
Kirkus Reviews
Readers of a Datlow/Windling anthology have certain expectations: that the thick volume will include stories by writers both known and new; that headpieces for each tale will be Vess's sinuously evocative drawings; that a fully formed introduction will lay out the collection's parameters; that notes and a bit of biography will follow each story; and that an excellent bibliography will be included. The 22 writers include Jane Yolen, Ellen Kushner, Midori Snyder, Tanith Lee and Peter S. Beagle, among others. Delia Sherman's "The Selkie Speaks" allows a seal maiden to tell her own tale; Terra L. Gearhart-Serna brings a trickster's sly voice and a little Spanish into her first published writing, "Coyote and Valarosa." Marly Youmans turns to glassmaking and the Blue Ridge Mountains for the intensely romantic "The Salamander's Fire." The three interwoven motifs of these tales, inspired by many cultures, are beings who shape-shift between animal and human of their own will, who are transformed as a curse or enchantment and who are both human and animal yet wholly neither. Rich reading that meets the editors' high standards. (Fantasy/short stories. 12 & up)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780670011452
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
04/01/2010
Pages:
512
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.70(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Ellen Datlow is the editor of Sci Fiction (scifi.com/scifiction)

Terri Windling is the author of The Wood Wife

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The Beastly Bride: Tales of the Animal People 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
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TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Werewolves, vampires, and mermaids all have one thing in common: they are shape-changers. This book is a compilation of their stories. From Finland to India, the tales cover everything from an unruly bride to new world explorers. Some are humorous, while others are tragic. These Immortals' stories have come together to confound, delight, and, most of all, entertain. THE BEASTLY BRIDE is an excellent anthology of some of the best stories from around the world. Some tales will seem familiar, while others will not. The enjoyment of them, however, will not change. The layout is done quite well, the forward is well-written, and the bibliography well-laid out and easy to reference. Readers who like fantasy, shapeshifters, and anthologies will all enjoy this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
****Cool fact! Look at the front cover and turn the book upside down! There's more to the cover than what meets the eye!***** I stumbled upon this book at my local library, browsing among the shelves. I'm a great fan of Terri Windling and Ellen Datlow's anthologies but I had no idea they were coming out with a new one! I haven't yet read all of the stories but I love this book and highly recommend it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I...smell.......WEREWOLVES!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Picks his teeth with a stake.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Munches on a twinkie.