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Beautiful Place on Yonge Street
     

Beautiful Place on Yonge Street

by Don Trembath
 

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Sunny Taylor is tall and thin, with "the smoothest and whitest skin" Harper has ever seen. Her eyes are deep and dark; her voice is a little high and sweet. She enjoys drawing and taking long, brisk walks. Sunny and Harper go for picnics and to the movies, where they make-out (or try to) in the balcony. They joke and talk and hang out together whenever they can.

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Overview

Sunny Taylor is tall and thin, with "the smoothest and whitest skin" Harper has ever seen. Her eyes are deep and dark; her voice is a little high and sweet. She enjoys drawing and taking long, brisk walks. Sunny and Harper go for picnics and to the movies, where they make-out (or try to) in the balcony. They joke and talk and hang out together whenever they can.

For the moment at least, life is full of smiles and love. But hovering above, like a thundercloud on a hot summer day, is a question that Sunny must deal with. Her aunt has offered her the opportunity to attend art school in Toronto and live with her in her "beautiful place on Yonge Street." Will Sunny head for the big city or stay home? And will Harper survive his first brush with the vagaries of love?

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Sarah Flowers
In this third installment in the life and times of Harper Winslow (Tuesday Cafe [Orca, 1996/VOYA February 1997], A Fly Named Alfred [Orca, 1997/VOYA October 1997]), Harper falls in love. The object of his affection is Sunny Taylor. Harper meets Sunny through her brother, Mickey, who is attending the Wilderness Writing Camp with Harper. After class, Harper hangs out with Sunny and her family, taking walks, playing twenty questions, eating Kentucky Fried Chicken. When camp is over, they continue to see one another, visiting one another's families and enjoying the summer together. There are clouds on the horizon, however, as Sunny's aunt has invited her to move to Toronto in the fall to attend art school and live with her for the year in her "beautiful place on Yonge Street." Sunny wants to go, but her parents are unsure, and Harper is finding it hard to imagine Sunny moving halfway across the country when their relationship has just begun. Meanwhile, Harper's ever-controlling mother finds it a bit difficult to cope with Harper having a girlfriend. Sunny's first dinner with Harper's family is a classic scene that will be appreciated by anyone whose parents ever embarrassed him (or her) in front of a new girlfriend (or boyfriend). Harper's inarticulate but overwhelming lust for Sunny resonates. In one scene, Sunny loses a contact lens while they are making out in a movie theater. Harper has a hard time imagining how this could have happened: "I mean, you could have poked out both my eyes with a stick and I wouldn't have noticed, but she felt a little itch somewhere and went looking for it with her finger, and now this." The writing is competent and concise, and the author really "gets" what being a kid is all about. Once again, Trembath has created credible teenage characters, interacting in believable but highly entertaining ways with each other and with adults. VOYA Codes: 4Q 4P J (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses, Broad general YA appeal, Junior High-defined as grades 7 to 9).
School Library Journal
Gr 7-10-In this third installment about Harper Winslow, the 16-year-old aspiring writer experiences the ups and downs of first love. The story opens with Harper at a writing camp, where he meets Mickey Taylor and his sister Sunny. The Taylor family is open and free in comparison to Harper's parents, who are driven professionals with little or no time for their son, but who demand perfection from him. As Harper becomes more attached to Sunny and her family, his parents become resentful of his growing independence and detachment from them. Meanwhile, Sunny is trying to decide whether she should remain in Edmonton or move to Toronto to live with her aunt and attend art school. As things settle down with his parents, Harper must put his powerful feelings for Sunny into perspective and help her make the choice that's right for her. While the supporting characters are well realized, there is not a lot of action here. However, the situations are realistically portrayed and Harper's experiences with first love are described with humor and poignancy.-Lucinda Lockwood, Thomas Haney Secondary School, Maple Ridge, BC Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Third in a series of books (The Tuesday Cafe, 1998, not reviewed, etc.) set in Canada, featuring 16-year-old Harper Winslow from a suburb of Edmonton.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780606169783
Publisher:
San Val, Incorporated
Publication date:
10/01/1999

Meet the Author

Don Trembath's first book, The Tuesday Cafe, was published in 1996. Don also teaches writing at MacEwan University in Edmonton, and regularly visit schools and libraries across the country. Don currently lives in the town of Morinville, Alberta with his wife, Lisa, their three kids, three laid back cats, and their neighbor's big dog.

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