×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Beck-Ola [Bonus Tracks]
     

Beck-Ola [Bonus Tracks]

5.0 1
by Jeff Beck
 

See All Formats & Editions

When it was originally released in June 1969, Beck-Ola, the Jeff Beck Group's second album, featured a famous sleeve note on its back cover: "Today, with all the hard competition in the music business, it's almost impossible to come up with anything totally original. So we haven't. However, this disc was made with the accent on

Overview

When it was originally released in June 1969, Beck-Ola, the Jeff Beck Group's second album, featured a famous sleeve note on its back cover: "Today, with all the hard competition in the music business, it's almost impossible to come up with anything totally original. So we haven't. However, this disc was made with the accent on heavy music. So sit back and listen and try and decide if you can find a small place in your heads for it." Beck was reacting to the success of peers and competitors like Cream and Led Zeppelin here, bands that had been all over the charts with a hard rock sound soon to be dubbed heavy metal, and indeed, his sound employs much the same brand of "heavy music" as theirs, with deliberate rhythms anchoring the beat, over which the guitar solos fiercely and the lead singer emotes. But he was also preparing listeners for the weakness of the material on an album that sounds somewhat thrown together. Two songs are rehauls of Elvis Presley standards ("All Shook Up" and "Jailhouse Rock") and one is an instrumental interlude contributed by pianist Nicky Hopkins, promoted from sideman to group member, with the rest being band-written songs that serve basically as platforms for Beck's improvisations. But that doesn't detract from the album's overall quality, due both to the guitar work and the distinctive vocals of Rod Stewart, and Beck-Ola easily could have been the album to establish the Jeff Beck Group as the equal of the other heavy bands of the day. Unfortunately, a series of misfortunes occurred. Beck canceled out of a scheduled appearance at Woodstock; he was in a car accident that sidelined him for over a year; and Stewart and bass player Ron Wood decamped to join Faces, breaking up the group. Nevertheless, Beck-Ola stands as a prime example of late-'60s British blues-rock and one of Beck's best records. [In June 2004 EMI released a digitally remastered edition of Beck-Ola featuring four previously unreleased bonus tracks: "Sweet Little Angel," "Throw Down a Line," and early versions of "All Shook Up" and "Jailhouse Rock."]

Product Details

Release Date:
06/15/2004
Label:
Emi Europe Generic
UPC:
0724357875028
catalogNumber:
578750

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Jeff Beck   Primary Artist,Guitar
Rod Stewart   Vocals
Ronnie Wood   Bass,Guitar,Bass Guitar
Nicky Hopkins   Piano
Tony Newman   Drums
Mickey Waller   Drums

Technical Credits

Jeff Beck   Composer
Elvis Presley   Composer
Rod Stewart   Composer
Ronnie Wood   Composer
Nicky Hopkins   Composer
Jerry Leiber   Composer
Hank Marvin   Composer
Otis Blackwell   Composer
Ken Scott   Engineer
Martin Birch   Engineer
B.B. King   Composer
Mickie Most   Producer,Audio Production
Tony Newman   Composer
Mike Stoller   Composer
Hugh Gilmour   Reissue Design
Charles Shaar Murray   Liner Notes,Sleeve Notes
Rene Magritte   Cover Painting
Nick Hopkins   Composer

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Beck-Ola 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
JohnQ More than 1 year ago
Yes, this is a Jeff Beck album but it is the vocal performance of Rod Stewart that makes this such a great album. Rod is the singer throughout the album and he does a truly memorable job with this odd selection of songs. The same is true of the other Beck/Stewart album: Truth.