Beckett at 100: Revolving it All

Overview


The year 2006 marked the centenary of the birth of Nobel-Prize winning playwright and novelist Samuel Beckett. To commemorate the occasion, this collection brings together twenty-three leading international Beckett scholars from ten countries, who take on the centenary challenge of "revolving it all": that is, going "back to Beckett"-the title of an earlier study by critic Ruby Cohn, to whom the book is dedicated-in order to rethink traditional readings and theories; provide new contexts and associations; and ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (16) from $5.99   
  • New (5) from $5.99   
  • Used (11) from $6.31   
Sending request ...

Overview


The year 2006 marked the centenary of the birth of Nobel-Prize winning playwright and novelist Samuel Beckett. To commemorate the occasion, this collection brings together twenty-three leading international Beckett scholars from ten countries, who take on the centenary challenge of "revolving it all": that is, going "back to Beckett"-the title of an earlier study by critic Ruby Cohn, to whom the book is dedicated-in order to rethink traditional readings and theories; provide new contexts and associations; and reassess his impact on the modern imagination and legacy to future generations.

These original essays, most first presented by the Samuel Beckett Working Group at the Dublin centenary celebration, are divided into three sections: (1) Thinking through Beckett, (2) Shifting Perspectives, and (3) Echoing Beckett. As repeatedly in his canon, images precede words. The book opens with stills from films of experimental filmmaker Peter Gidal and unpublished excerpts from Beckett's 1936-37 German Travel Diaries, presented by Beckett biographer James Knowlson, with permission from the Beckett estate.

Renowned director and theatre theoretician Herbert Blau follows with his personal Beckett "thinking through." Others in Part I explore Beckett and philosophy (Abbott), the influences of Bergson (Gontarski) and Leibniz (Mori), Beckett and autobiography (Locatelli), and Agamben on post-Holocaust testimony (Jones). Essays in Part II recontextualize Beckett's works in relation to iconography (Moorjani), film theoretician Rudolf Arnheim (Engelberts), Marshall McLuhan (Ben-Zvi), exilic writing (McMullan), Pierre Bourdieu's literary field (Siess), romanticism (Brater), social theorists Adorno and Horkheimer (Degani-Raz), and performance issues (Rodr�guez-Gago). Part III relates Beckett's writing to that of Yeats (Okamuro), Paul Auster (Campbell), Caryl Churchill (Diamond), William Saroyan (Bryden), Minoru Betsuyaku and Harold Pinter (Tanaka) and Morton Feldman and Jasper Johns (Laws). Finally, Beckett himself becomes a character in other playwrights' works (Zeifman). Taken together these essays make a clear case for the challenges and rewards of thinking through Beckett in his second century.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195325485
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 1/8/2008
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 9.10 (w) x 6.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Linda Ben-Zvi is Professor of Theatre Studies, Tel Aviv University and Professor emerita, English and Theatre, Colorado State University. Among her many books are Susan Glaspell: Her Life and Times (Oxford UP, 2005). She is a recipient of the George Freedley Special Jury Prize, Theatre Library Association, and was a John Stern Distinguished Professor at Colorado, Fellow at the Library of Congress, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Lady Davis Professor at Hebrew University, and twice elected President of the International Samuel Beckett Society.

Angela Moorjani is emerita professor of modern languages and linguistics (French) at the University of Maryland-UMBC. Her many studies of Samuel Beckett and the aesthetic and ethical effects of melancholy in literature and the arts include the postructural Abysmal Games in the Novels of Samuel Beckett (1982), The Aesthetics of Loss and Lessness (1992) and Beyond Fetishism (2000).

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Contributors     ix
Introduction   Linda Ben-Zvi     3
Images. For Ruby Cohn
Still for Ruby   Peter Gidal     15
Beckett the Tourist: Bamberg and Wurzburg   James Knowlson     21
Thinking Through Beckett
Apnea and True Illusion: Breath(less) in Beckett   Herbert Blau     35
From Contumacy to Shame: Reading Beckett's Testimonies with Agamben   David Houston Jones     54
Projections: Beckett's Krapp's Last Tape and Not I as Autobiographies   Carla Locatelli     68
"I Am Not a Philosopher"   H. Porter Abbott     81
Recovering Beckett's Bergsonism   S. E. Gontarski     93
"No Body Is at Rest": The Legacy of Leibniz's Force in Beckett's Oeuvre   Naoya Mori     107
Shifting Perspectives
"Just Looking": Ne(i)ther-World Icons, Elsheimer Nocturnes, and Other Simultaneities in Beckett's Play   Angela Moorjani     123
Beckett's Romanticism   Enoch Brater     139
Film and Film: Beckett and Early Film Theory   Matthijs Engelberts     152
Beckett's Theater: Embodying Alterity   Anna McMullan     166
Beckett's Posture in the French Literary Field   Jurgen Siess     177
The Spear of Telephus in Krapp's Last Tape   Irit Degani-Raz     190
Re-Figuring the Stage Body through the Mechanical Re-Production of Memory   Antonia Rodriguez-Gago     202
Echoing Beckett
Words and Music, ... but the clouds..., and Yeats's "The Tower"   Minako Okamuro     217
Beckett-Feldman-Johns   Catherine Laws     230
Ontological Fear and Anxiety in the Theater of Beckett, Betsuyaku, and Pinter   Mariko Hori Tanaka     246
The Midcentury Godot: Beckett and Saroyan   Mary Bryden     259
Beckett, McLuhan, and Television: The Medium, the Message, and "the Mess"   Linda Ben-Zvi     271
Beckett and Caryl Churchill along the Mobius Strip   Elin Diamond     285
Beckett and Paul Auster: Fathers and Sons and the Creativity of Misreading   Julie Campbell     299
Staging Sam: Beckett as Dramatic Character   Hersh Zeifman     311
Index     319
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)