Becoming a Doctor: From Student to Specialist, Doctor-Writers Share Their Experiences by Lee Gutkind, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Becoming a Doctor: From Student to Specialist, Doctor-Writers Share Their Experiences
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Becoming a Doctor: From Student to Specialist, Doctor-Writers Share Their Experiences

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by Lee Gutkind
     
 

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Physicians recount true, personal stories from their professional lives in this inspired anthology by new and known writers.
In this poignant collection, doctors who are writers (and vice versa) relate their real-life journeys from intern to specialist, student to teacher, reflecting on the rewards, disillusionments, and triumphs encountered along the way.

Overview

Physicians recount true, personal stories from their professional lives in this inspired anthology by new and known writers.
In this poignant collection, doctors who are writers (and vice versa) relate their real-life journeys from intern to specialist, student to teacher, reflecting on the rewards, disillusionments, and triumphs encountered along the way. Featuring a wide array of distinguished voices, including Peter Kramer, Kay Redfield Jamison, Robert Coles, Lauren Slater, Sandeep Jauhar, and Perri Klass, these original stories create a vivid mural of the medical world and provide invaluable insight for both doctors in training and longtime physicians. Becoming a Doctor portrays the broad arc of a doctor’s life, from a medical student’s uneasy first encounter with a cadaver and her realization that the experience’s redemption will lie ahead in the lives saved, to a resident’s reliance on dance during her grueling year in an inner-city hospital, and a veteran doctor’s profound ruminations on what it means to really listen to a patient’s story.

Editorial Reviews

Christine Montross
“Here, some of the best-known names in medical writing are joined by powerful new voices to help elucidate the mysterious and grueling transformation from non-doctor to doctor. Readers will gain insight into both the exuberance and disillusionment of physicians-in-training. A remarkable collection.”
Publishers Weekly
Here’s the invaluable insight patients so often miss from doctors —revelations that expose the person underneath the white coat as not just capable but vulnerable and all too human. Gutkind, founder of the journal Creative Nonfiction and editor of numerous volumes of creative nonfiction, selects 19 men and women who bravely, and often lyrically, demonstrate that they are “ordinary people engaged in an extraordinary profession.” Perri Klass explains why she tries to teach her medical students that “clinical medicine is all about stories.” Zaldy S. Tan writes of how helping a beloved and very ill grandmother cured him of the smugness residents feel toward elderly patients. And Abigail Zuger discovered an unruly, demanding patient was suddenly compliant “all because I once treated her like a person, not a patient.” In their stories, each physician confirms one simple, powerful truth, as noted by Pulitzer Prize–winner Robert Coles: it is “important to be a scientist who knows how to listen, how to think, and how to express himself as clearly as possible.” (Mar.)
Library Journal
Gutkind (writing, Arizona State Univ.) has amassed a collection of essays by doctors who are also writers, e.g., Perri Klass, Danielle Ofri, and Sandeep Jauhar. These and others give readers a glimpse into the lives of medical professionals at various stages of their career. In one story, first-year resident Chris Stookey faces malpractice and must come to terms with how he could be sued by a patient whom he saw only briefly. In another, pediatric primary-care doctor Klass describes her work teaching first-year medical students how to interact with and interview patients so they can learn what a remarkable privilege it is to gain access into people's lives. Kay Jamison describes how being diagnosed with bipolar disorder changed her career path from becoming a doctor to finding a new interest in psychology. VERDICT Medical students and medical professionals will enjoy these perspectives on their profession; they will likely encounter or have encountered many of the obstacles narrated.—Dana Ladd, Community Health Education Ctr., Virginia Commonwealth Univ. Libs. & Virginia Commonwealth Univ. Health Syst., Richmond
Rachel Saslow - Washington Post
“It seems unjust that a person should be endowed with a mind that can craft beautiful sentences and master all the information needed to graduate from medical school. But that’s the case with many of the physician writers in Becoming a Doctor.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393071566
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
03/01/2010
Pages:
228
Sales rank:
845,728
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Lee Gutkind is the founder and editor of the literary journal Creative Nonfiction and a pioneer in the field of narrative nonfiction. Gutkind is also the editor of In Fact and Becoming a Doctor, the author of Almost Human, and has written books about baseball, health care, travel, and technology. A Distinguished Writer in Residence at Arizona State University, he lives in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Tempe, Arizona.

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Becoming a Doctor: From Student to Specialist, Doctor-Writers Share Their Experiences 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ARAEYA COUTURE
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An amazing book it shows what u need to be a docter. A very responsible task
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. I found it comprehensive and useful to understand what it means to become a doctor. I think that it might also be a good read for all those people who want to understand better their physicians. I think it gives everyone a real appreciation of the medical profession and what it means to become a doctor.