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Becoming Alice: A Memoir [NOOK Book]

Overview

"Strongly recommended a deftly written memoir that will hold the reader's rapt attention from beginning to end."

-Midwest Book Review



"Her ability to authentically capture the bewilderment and pain of dislocation through a child's eyes - including the disharmony in her immediate family - makes for engaging reading that will resonate with young adults everywhere."

-Beth B. Cohen, Ph.D., author of Case Closed: Holocaust Survivors in America, ...

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Becoming Alice: A Memoir

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Overview

"Strongly recommended a deftly written memoir that will hold the reader's rapt attention from beginning to end."

-Midwest Book Review



"Her ability to authentically capture the bewilderment and pain of dislocation through a child's eyes - including the disharmony in her immediate family - makes for engaging reading that will resonate with young adults everywhere."

-Beth B. Cohen, Ph.D., author of Case Closed: Holocaust Survivors in America, 1946-1954


Six-year-old Ilse watches Nazi soldiers march down her street in Vienna, Austria. It is the beginning of an odyssey that will take her to Riga, Latvia, and finally to Portland, Oregon. Becoming Alice chronicles her Jewish family's harrowing escape and struggle as immigrants to fit into the American landscape. The added problems of growing up within a troubled family cloud her childhood and adolescence.


Ilse changes her name to Alice. Not until she moves into a boarding house in Berkeley, surrounded by girls from a patchwork of cultures, does she make peace with her true identity. Becoming Alice brilliantly showcases Rene's triumph over adversity, identity crisis, and the sometimes debilitating power of family ties.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780595615438
  • Publisher: iUniverse, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 8/29/2008
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 273
  • Sales rank: 214,550
  • File size: 2 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

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(7)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 7 of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2009

    Becoming Alice: A Memoir

    I really enjoyed Becoming Alice by Alice Rene. The first part of the book was about her and her family's escape from Vienna when the Nazis arrived. The rest of the book covers her new life in the United States and her struggle to fit in. This aspect of her story was very interesting to read, considering what she had already been through. She really gave an in depth look at what it was like for immigrants trying to adjust to their new country and their new life. It was an exciting read and I think it is really great that she shared her story. The way she describes events makes the reader feel as though they are there with her. I highly recommend this book.

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  • Posted October 12, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A touching story of svrival and adaptation

    In "Becoming Alice, A Memoir", we are introduced to the Fell family through the eyes of their daughter Ilse, who was only six years old when the Nazi soldier's changed her life forever. As she watched them marching down the street she could never have imagined the destruction and devastation that they would leave in their path. Barely able to stay ahead of the invading army the Fell family flees from their home in Vienna, Austria. First they go to Riga, then to Latvia and finally to the safety of America. Arriving in Portland, Oregon they were unaware of the hardships they were about to face living in a world they were not acquainted with. Each and everyday became a struggle for this once prominent family, no longer could they live the life that accustomed to. Soon Ilse childhood became marred by the events that fell upon her family, never knowing where she fit in and trying to adjust to this strange land. Trying to make the best of every situation became hard as she went from Ilse to Illy to Elsie and even Sally before she finally became Alice. When she became Alice she finally began to become comfortable in her own skin.

    "Becoming Alice, a Memoir", is a moving narrative that will touch your heart and stir your soul. Wrote as though she is telling you personally the story of her life, Alice Rene, moves you to tears and then cheers you up as she brings you the highs and the lows of her life. Alice Rene has no only written her memoirs she has written a book that will inspire all of us rise above what is holding you down. Truly a book that all should read. I considered it an honor to review her wonderful book.

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  • Posted August 12, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Katie Hayes for TeensReadToo.com

    Born with the name Ilse, Alice Rene was six when the Nazis took over her hometown of Vienna, Austria.

    Her Jewish family was forced to flee, and while many others, including some of her family members, weren't so lucky, Ilse and her parents and older brother eventually settle in Portland, Oregon.

    From there, Alice documents her life in America: learning English, her struggles making friends at school, becoming an American citizen. She changes her name from Ilse to Alice and starts calling her parents "Mom" and "Dad" instead of "Mama" and "Papa."

    As she gets older, Alice experiences her first romance and watches her older brother go through the pain of heartbreak. She also gains the courage to stand up to her overbearing father for the first time. When high school ends and she starts applying to college, Alice begins to plan ways to forge her own identity apart from her family.

    This is an interesting memoir that reads more as a series of chronological anecdotes than a straightforward narrative. While the effects of the Holocaust are an inescapable part of the novel, the focus is more on Alice's experiences becoming American and establishing her own identity.

    I would recommend BECOMING ALICE as an interesting coming-of-age memoir.

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  • Posted August 10, 2009

    Becoming Alice

    From her window, Ilse sees the Nazi soldiers parading through her street. Ilse realizes that the Jewish are not wanted in Austria, when she and the family maid go shopping. When their band account is frozen, Ilse's father decides they must sell some of their possessions. Her father then escapes from Austria by saying he will go gather goose feathers. Her father gets visa's for Ilse, her mother and brother. Unfortunately the Nazi's have shut the border and the family has to reroute their trip. When they finally arrive in Lithuania, Ilse is reunited with her father. Herr Lehmann smuggles the family over the border to Latvia. Fredi, Ilse's brother can get a visa to America is he goes to boarding school. Their parents make him go. Ilse's father has been trying to get visas for the rest of the family with no success. Finally the family is granted the visas. They have to travel through Kobe, Japan. Once they arrive in Kobe, they board a ship that will take the refugees to their new home in America. Ilse's family settles in Portland, Oregon. An organization that helps the Jewish find jobs, offers to buy a grocery store for the family to run. After much consideration, Ilse's parents agree. Later they enroll Ilse in school, which causes her much distress because she speaks no English. After living in the United States for the required five years, the family applied for citizenship. Ilse changes her name to Alice because it sounds more "American." She hopes changing her name to Alice will make her upcoming high school years easier than her grade school. After graduating from high school, life begins to be more comfortable for her.
    Many people know something about the Jewish Holocaust, but you hardly ever hear about a family who escapes by moving to the United States. It was refreshing to read a story about a Jewish family that had a relatively happy ending.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2008

    Insights

    'The beautiful young girl on the cover of Becoming Alice draws you into the drama of her life story. While the book expresses a child centered view of the holocaust it is most unique in its demonstration of the ultimate consequences of terror and displacement, showing us the psychological effects that overtake a family and a young girl as they move into a New World having had to leave their identities behind. It is an enlightening biography that speaks with an honest voice'. Linda Sher Salzman

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2013

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