Becoming Shakespeare: The Unlikely Afterlife That Turned a Provincial Playwright into the Bard

( 5 )

Overview

Becoming Shakespeare begins where most Shakespeare stories end—with his death in 1616—and relates the fascinating story of his unlikely transformation from provincial playwright to universal Bard. Unlike later literary giants, Shakespeare created no stir when he died. Though he'd once had a string of hit plays, he had been retired in the country for six years, and only his family, friends, and business partners seemed to care that he was gone. Within a few years he was nearly forgotten. And when London's theaters...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (18) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $2.44   
  • Used (15) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$2.44
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(706)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
*~*~ Brand New, Mint Condition. Never Previously Owned.*~*~ Ships Immediately *~*~ Hassle-Free Refunds If you Aren't Fully Satisfied ~*~*

Ships from: Deer Park, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$2.47
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(15722)

Condition: New
Brand New! New dust jacket.

Ships from: Frederick, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$36.28
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(3)

Condition: New
New *****PLEASE NOTE: This item is shipping from an authorized seller in Europe. In the event that a return is necessary, you will be able to return your item within the US. To ... learn more about our European sellers and policies see the BookQuest FAQ section***** Read more Show Less

Ships from: LIVERPOOL, United Kingdom

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Becoming Shakespeare: The Unlikely Afterlife That Turned a Provincial Playwright into the Bard

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.49
BN.com price
(Save 13%)$10.99 List Price

Overview

Becoming Shakespeare begins where most Shakespeare stories end—with his death in 1616—and relates the fascinating story of his unlikely transformation from provincial playwright to universal Bard. Unlike later literary giants, Shakespeare created no stir when he died. Though he'd once had a string of hit plays, he had been retired in the country for six years, and only his family, friends, and business partners seemed to care that he was gone. Within a few years he was nearly forgotten. And when London's theaters were shut down in 1642, he seemed destined for oblivion.

With the Restoration in 1660, though, the theaters were open once again, and Shakespeare began his long ascent: No longer merely one playwright among many, he became the transcendent genius at the heart of English culture. Fifty years after the Restoration scholars began taking him seriously. Fifty years after that he was considered England's greatest genius. And by 1800 he was practically divine.

Jack Lynch vividly chronicles Shakespeare's afterlife—from the revival of his plays to the decades when his work was co-opted and "improved" by politicians and other playwrights, and culminating with the "Bardolatry" of the Stratford celebration of Shakespeare's three-hundredth birthday in 1864. Becoming Shakespeare is not only essential reading for anyone intrigued by Shakespeare, but it also offers a consideration of the vagaries of fame.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"An accessible chronicle of Shakespeare's rise to his present glory...Lynch provocatively argues that the great rise in literacy occurring around the time of the Restoration also contributed to the birth of critical interest in the plays as texts; fierce disputes arose over their interpretation, the manna of Shakespeare criticism to this day. He engagingly details the strengths, shortcomings and literary relevance of major editions alongside those now merely of historical interest because they attempted to sanitize the bawdy bard to reflect the more decorous tastes of late-18th-century or Victorian sensibilities. Pitched just right for students of literature, Shakespeareans and those interested in the history of drama: a witty and appealing story of how a superstar was born."—Kirkus Reviews "Lynch is most interesting when examining how different eras rewrote and edited Shakespeare to make the plays meet the moral and theatrical standards of their time...Lynch's text will appeal to general readers with an interest in Shakespeare. Recommended for public libraries."—Library Journal
Publishers Weekly

It's easy to assume that William Shakespeare has always held his position at the top of the literary canon. But the truth is not that simple, as Lynch, a professor of English at Rutgers and longtime student of literary history, demonstrates. He ably chronicles how "in three hundred years, William Shakespeare the talented playwright and theatre shareholder had become Shakespeare the transcendent demigod," against whom no slight of literary criticism was too small not to be deemed heresy. Along the way, Shakespeare was all but forgotten; criticized for his sloppy, profane dramaturgy; rewritten, forged and bowdlerized (literally, by the eponymous Bowdler); hijacked as a spokesperson for political causes of all stripes; revered and, finally, unquestioningly glorified. Lynch tells the story of the personalities and politics that shaped both the reception of the Bard's works and the development of the theater in England between 1616, the year of Shakespeare's death, and 1864, his 300th birthday. Lynch writes fluidly about the Puritan aspirations that shut the English theaters after Queen Elizabeth's death, the Restoration and consequent revitalization of London's theatrical culture, the rise of celebrity culture and the spread of literacy that took Shakespeare off the stage and into the parlor and classroom. Illus. (July)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Kirkus Reviews
An accessible chronicle of Shakespeare's rise to his present glory. Samuel Johnson scholar Lynch (English/Rutgers) quickly makes clear what this study involves: "the long process that turned a very competent playwright into a demigod." Picking up where many a Shakespearean leaves off, he dismisses the authorship question entirely. "Fantasies about faked deaths and undercover noblemen certainly make for an exciting story," he writes, "but there's nothing to them." Lynch focuses instead on charting Shakespeare's transformation from a popular playwright in his day to a writer many now consider the keystone of the Western literary canon. This metamorphosis, he contends, has taken hundreds of years and the collected efforts of numerous individuals from a variety of arenas, some more predictable than others. It was only after the Restoration in 1660, for instance, that Shakespeare's work gained onstage life it hadn't known since the Puritans closed the public theatres in 1642. Charles II sanctioned two new theatres, which brought drama back to the fore of London life and enabled late-17th- to early-18th-century actors such as Thomas Betterton, James Quin, David Garrick and Sarah Siddons to gain great fame by playing Shakespeare's leading roles. Lynch provocatively argues that the great rise in literacy occurring around the time of the Restoration also contributed to the birth of critical interest in the plays as texts; fierce disputes arose over their interpretation, the manna of Shakespeare criticism to this day. He engagingly details the strengths, shortcomings and literary relevance of major editions alongside those now merely of historical interest because they attempted to sanitize thebawdy bard to reflect the more decorous tastes of late-18th-century or Victorian sensibilities. Pitched just right for students of literature, Shakespeareans and those interested in the history of drama: a witty and appealing story of how a superstar was born.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780802715661
  • Publisher: Walker & Company
  • Publication date: 6/28/2007
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 5.56 (w) x 8.80 (h) x 1.19 (d)

Meet the Author

Jack Lynch, a professor of English at Rutgers University, has been studying the curious afterlife of William Shakespeare for more than fifteen years. He is the editor of Samuel Johnson's Dictionary and Samuel Johnson's Insults. He lives in Lawrenceville, New Jersey.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


A Note on Quotations     vii
Introduction     1
Reviving Shakespeare     11
Performing Shakespeare     42
Studying Shakespeare     76
Improving Shakespeare     110
Co-opting Shakespeare     138
Domesticating Shakespeare     171
Forging Shakespeare     204
Worshipping Shakespeare     239
Epilogue     273
Acknowledgments     281
Further Reading     285
Index     299
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2013

    Have not read more than few pages...it appears to be an excelle

    Have not read more than few pages...it appears to be an excellent treatment of the subject... but in a history book, it is troubling to find that the early dates are 200 years off. All the dates of events that took place in the 1500's are printed as having occurred during the 1300's. I am sure this is a spell checker error from the manuscript...but this is an ebook, and it could easily be fixed. Why don't you fix it, Barnes & Noble?

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 10, 2013

    Like the other reviewer, I found this excellent book marred by t

    Like the other reviewer, I found this excellent book marred by the fact that nearly every "5" in dates appeared as a "3."  As I personally know quite a bit about Shakespeare and Elizabethan England, I knew the errors and assumed that every 5 would be a 3.  Not so.  So, when I got to parts with which I was less familiar, such as dates dealing with 18th Century actors, I had no idea what the correct date was--was it 1758 1738?  I see no reason for this type of error, nor do I think for one minute that the author of this well-researched book was in any way at fault.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2013

    Don't Buy the E-text

    The accuracy of the e-text is an insipid. Pictures will appear on one page, that caption will appear on another, sometimes the caption is on the correct page but text bleeds over into the caption. Subtext headers may appear at the bottom of a page, hyphens appear where they don't belong. Spaces between some words disappear. In many places following a date the first word of text is distorted. And, as both other reviewers have noted dates that should appear as 15XX appear as 13XX making the text unreliable for students. The e-text is an embarrassment for the publisher. All the errors detract from the professional research and excellent writing skills of Jack Lynch. If the quality of publication matched the scholarly skill of the writer I would have give this a 5.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 24, 2013

    Fix the typos and give us a better electronic edition.  This is

    Fix the typos and give us a better electronic edition.  This is ridiculous.  Rating is solely for the lack of editing in the ebook.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)