Becoming the Enchanter: A Journey to the Heart of the Celtic Mysteries

Overview

At the age of thirty-one, Lyn Webster was leading an average if slightly numbed existence, assuaging the grief over her fiancé's death with alcohol and carrying on her busy career as a producer for British television. One day in Liverpool, however, all of this changed when she unleashed her fury upon a group of mischievous boys and a coworker recognized her as one of her own kind, a woman warrior.

Thus began Lyn's journey into a magical realm deeply rooted in Celtic myth and ...

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Overview

At the age of thirty-one, Lyn Webster was leading an average if slightly numbed existence, assuaging the grief over her fiancé's death with alcohol and carrying on her busy career as a producer for British television. One day in Liverpool, however, all of this changed when she unleashed her fury upon a group of mischievous boys and a coworker recognized her as one of her own kind, a woman warrior.

Thus began Lyn's journey into a magical realm deeply rooted in Celtic myth and tradition, an underground network of sacred practitioners who maintained the secrets of the old wisdom while leading normal lives in the everyday world.

Becoming the Enchanter is an artfully told work of narrative nonfiction that reads like a fantastical novel, complete with magical interludes and a fast-moving plot that builds as Lyn pursues the mystery of the riddle given to her by a godmother figure, Eleanor, on her deathbed.

As the author illustrates, the tradition of which she became a part dates back to the Neolithic era and contains a deep knowledge not unlike that which Carlos Castaneda encountered in his experiences with the Yaqui Indians.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Readers who like to flirt with the supernatural and have a penchant for Celtic intrigue will relish this trek through the borders of consciousness. Written by a British television producer with a gift for concise descriptions of the utterly fantastic, the memoir details what happens when she is challenged by an acquaintance to become a "woman warrior." Her aim? To help revive the mysteries of ancient British tradition through making pilgrimages to ancient holy places, helping to create dramatic mythical re-enactments and entering into what may truly be mystical experiences (or what skeptics might call self or group-induced hypnosis). The endearingly down-to-earth writer finds, and sometimes loses, fellow pilgrims willing to play elaborate and occasionally spooky mind games to unravel the riddle of the "house of Arianrhod," the virgin who bears a child. "Everything is One, and we must never forget it," one of the book's "wise elder" figures tells the author. "This is why there is no need for a battle between paganism and Christianity: the truth is indivisible." Sometimes gliding and sometimes lurching between her mythic quest and the necessities of hearth and home, Wilde is honest about the human cost of obsession with the "Otherworld": one fellow seeker temporarily abandons her family for another group member. Others, including the author, mine the boundaries of psychological disintegration. Defiantly impractical, often a touch self-indulgent, this interior travelogue ends as the author achieves her own quest for secret knowledge. Now it is up to readers, she suggests, to make their own journeys beyond space and time.(Oct.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Sometime London-based TV producer and writer Wilde (On the Trail of the Women Warriors, 2000) offers a "nonfiction narrative" of her quest for spirituality via rituals assembled from beliefs supposedly practiced in "Neolithic" Britain. The author portrays herself as despondent over her fiancé's death and seeking solace in booze when, now some 20 years ago, she encounters an "Afro-Celtic" woman in Liverpool whose eyes have "triple irises"-the whole book is like this-and who advises her that she, Wilde, is actually a "woman warrior" in search of her destiny. Wilde is then passed to Cyril (no last names here), a shadowy figure who may or may not be a prophet, for initiation into rituals derived primarily from Welsh mythology. She immediately transfers a self-confessed obsession with "what existed before creation" into the context provided by Cyril, and the adventures begin. If Carlos Casta-eda, to whom Wilde occasionally refers as a like-minded pioneer in native spiritualities, had only known that such trances, visions, transports to space-time fields, spiral castles, dragon's lairs, and other figments of the "Otherworld" were available through mere ingestion of Guinness and an occasional whisky, he might have spared himself the risk of peyote. And if visions, per se, can have the ring of illegitimacy, these do: in one, Wilde encounters a "huntress" with a bow and arrow-no mention of a quiver; in another, a strange "French woman" heard from a distance as she strolls up a beach smoking a Gauloise and humming the "Marseillaise." At one point, Wilde marches off alone into a moonless night to find a circle of standing stones; a few weeks later, in a darkened room, she reveals an ongoingparalytic terror of the dark. "Sexual energy" constantly flows among the companions she chooses to act out a creation myth based on both incestuous rape and-why not?-"virgin birth," with indecipherable results. Harry Potter and the Premenopausal Feminist.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781585421824
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 9/25/2002
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 5.76 (w) x 8.62 (h) x 1.15 (d)

Meet the Author

Lyn Webster Wilde is a producer for British and international television.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2002

    Strange...Interesting - a Page Turner

    The book is about women finding their own inner power - real and magical - through self-exploration and re-enactments of Celtic myths. Written as a true, first person account, much of it rings absolutely true and yet, much of it seems so strange that you swear it HAS to be fiction -- but still, I couldn't put it down!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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