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Bedtime!
     

Bedtime!

by Joan W. Blos, Stephen Lambert (Illustrator)
 
Busy playing with his favorite toys, a little boy doesn't want to go to bed--so his grandmother tucks each toy into bed with a kiss. As she begins reading to them, the little boy is finally ready to join his sleepy friends. Full color.

Overview

Busy playing with his favorite toys, a little boy doesn't want to go to bed--so his grandmother tucks each toy into bed with a kiss. As she begins reading to them, the little boy is finally ready to join his sleepy friends. Full color.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This clever bedtime tale is sleep-inducing without being soporific, and offers adults a playful strategy for dealing with obstinate sleepyheads. When a grandmother announces, "Bedtime!", her grandson says, "No." However, as the evening draws on (marked by the changing minute hand on the clock face), the boy reports, one by one, that his three stuffed companions may be growing sleepy. The grandma tucks each one into the boy's bed with a goodnight kiss, then begins to read them a bedtime story "with no one sitting on her lap." The little boy climbs aboard to snuggle and hear the story's conclusion, and soon willingly joins his furry friends in bed. Writing in spare, soothing tones spiced with a sly sense of humor, Blos (A Gathering of Days) skillfully evokes a grandmother who knows little boys all too well, and appeals to a child's sense of play. She employs just the right amount of repetition to keep her young audience rapt to the last page. The calming, methodical rhythm of the text is mirrored in Lambert's (When I Was Like You) full-bleed, single-page pastels. His dense, geometric style echoes the boy's blocks and toys, and his warm hunter greens, burgundies and midnight blues emit shades of dusk. Although adults may have the most fun following Lambert's subtle gibe about the narrative's brief passage of time (the clock shows the story beginning at 7:00 p.m., and ending at 7:45), anyone with a curfew will find this book an all-around good time. Ages 1-3. (May)
Children's Literature - Children's Literature
The clock on the wall, the darkness outside, and even grandma say it. Everyone says it is time for bed, but the little boy refuses to go. While the boy continues to play, the clever grandma tucks all the toys into bed and starts reading a bedtime story with an empty lap. Soon, the little boy stops playing and climbs into her lap. They finish the story together. This simple tale is illustrated with muted colors with chalk pastel, which give a nice, soft feel to the illustrations. Unfortunately, the little boy's face on the final illustration is placed right in the gutter of the book, where the pages are fastened together. His face is only half showing which makes for a disturbing end to this picture book.
Children's Literature - Children's Literature
The clock on the wall, the darkness outside, and even grandma says it. Everyone says it is time for bed, but the little boy refuses to go. While the boy continues to play, the clever grandma tucks all the toys into bed and starts reading a bedtime story with an empty lap. Soon, the little boy stops playing and climbs into her lap. They finish the story together. This simple tale is illustrated with muted colors with chalk pastel, which give a nice, soft feel to the illustrations. Unfortunately, the little boy's face on the final illustration is placed right in the gutter of the book, where the pages are fastened together. His face is only half showing which makes for a disturbing end to this picture book.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS--A young boy attempts to forestall the inevitable in this familiar story. When his grandma announces, "Bedtime," the strong-willed youngster is too busy playing to comply. The woman counters by tucking a stuffed bear under the covers and kissing him goodnight. Soon the child admits that Tiger is also tired. A clown joins the others and the grandmother reads to her inanimate audience. At this point the little boy is ready to crawl into his grandma's comforting lap to share the story. He finally acquiesces to putting on his pajamas and climbing into bed. A clock face featured throughout indicates that 45 minutes have elapsed during the evening ritual. The illustrations are rendered in chalk pastels and the fuzzy, softened edges lend a warm aura to the story. Both the art and text are soothing. A good choice for collections needing more bedtime stories for very young children.--Rosalyn Pierini, San Luis Obispo City-County Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews
The setting of this bedtime tale is a clutter-free child's bedroom, where a boy refuses to go to bed but soon admits to his grandmother that one of his three stuffed toys might be sleepy. The narrator asks, "So do you know what that grandma did? She took that sleepy bear and she put him into the bed." One by one the boy releases the toys to the grandmother's custody, until they are all in bed without him. She begins reading a story "with no one sitting on her lap." Savvy children will predict this outcome: The boy finally retires and falls asleep. Everything in the room is soft-edged, portrayed in blocky shapes and lulling tones of blue and green, except for an alarm clock, whose details of numbers and hands are clear. The pictures are soothing but repetitious; only the conspiratorial tone between the narrator and readers distinguishes this entry from much of the bedtime-story canon. (Picture book. 1-3)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689810312
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
Publication date:
05/01/1998
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.31(w) x 7.79(h) x 0.47(d)
Age Range:
1 - 3 Years

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